UAB SON awarded $5.15M in Education, Clinical, & Training Grants
Dr. Ann Gakumo attends 2016 Butler-Williams Scholars Program
Jablonski-Jaudon achieves more milestones in field of aging, dementia
Post-Doc Deborah Ejem explores link between spirituality, health care
PhD student Lowe receives scholarships from NBNA, HPNF
Faculty, PhD student represent School at Thailand health care conference
Bakitas named MHRC Barkley Excellence in Mentoring Award winner
Bowen receives grant for health policy research
Post-doc receives five-year, $935,000 K-99/R00 from NINR

Race, regionality and pre-diabetes in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study.


Lee LT, Alexandrov AW, Howard VJ, Kabagambe EK, Hess MA, McLain RM, Safford MM, Howard G.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between race, region and pre-diabetes.

METHOD: The study used 2003-2007 United States baseline data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study for this cross-sectional analysis. Participants in this study were 45years or older at recruitment. Logistic regression was used to assess whether race and region are associated with pre-diabetes independent of demographics, socioeconomic factors and risk factors.

RESULTS: Twenty-four percent of the study participants (n=19,889) had pre-diabetes. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for having pre-diabetes was 1.28 (1.19-1.36) for blacks relative to whites and 1.18 (1.10-1.26) for people living in the Stroke Belt region relative to the other parts of the United States. The odds of having pre-diabetes for Stroke Belt participants changed minimally after additional adjustment for race (OR=1.20; 1.13-1.28), age and sex (OR=1.24; 1.16-1.32), socioeconomic status (OR=1.22; 1.15-1.31) and risk factors (OR=1.26; 1.17-1.35). In the adjusted model, being black was independently associated with pre-diabetes (OR=1.19; 1.10-1.28).

CONCLUSION: The prevalence of pre-diabetes was higher for both blacks and whites living in the Stroke Belt relative to living outside the Stroke Belt, and the prevalence of pre-diabetes was higher for blacks independent of region.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Link to PubMed