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Effect of an educational intervention on cardiovascular disease risk perception among women with preeclampsia

Spratling, P. M., Pryor, E. R., Moneyham, L. D., Hodges, A. L., White-Williams, C. L., & Martin, J. N., Jr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To promote knowledge and awareness about cardiovascular disease (CVD) among women with recent preeclampsia so that this population may develop more accurate perceptions of their personal CVD risk.

DESIGN: An exploratory single group, pretest/posttest educational intervention study.

SETTING: Telephone-based interviews.

PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-four women with preeclampsia in the most recent pregnancy completed the study. The sample was predominately African American.

METHODS: Knowledge about CVD and the study covariates (age, race, parity, income, marital status, education, and history of previous preeclampsia) were measured prior to CVD education. Levels of CVD risk perception were measured both before and after the CVD educational intervention.

INTERVENTION: Structured CVD education by telephone.

RESULTS: After CVD education, levels of CVD risk perception were significantly higher than at baseline.

CONCLUSION: As an intervention, CVD education provided by telephone served as a practical and effective approach to contact postpartum women with recent preeclampsia and demonstrated effectiveness in increasing perception of CVD risk.

© 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

Link to PubMed