The impact of feedback on self-rated driving ability and driving self-regulation among older adults.

Ackerman ML, Crowe M, Vance DE, Wadley VG, Owsley C, Ball KK.

Department of Psychology, Edward R. Roybal Center for Translational Research on Aging and Mobility, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. mlynnack@uab.edu

Abstract

In 129 community-dwelling older adults, feedback regarding qualification for an insurance discount (based on a visual speed of processing test; Useful Field of View) was examined as a prospective predictor of change in self-reported driving ability, driving avoidance, and driving exposure over 3 months, along with physical, visual, health, and cognitive variables. Multiple regression models indicated that after controlling for baseline scores on the outcome measures, failure to qualify was a significant predictor of increased avoidance over 3 months (p = .02) but not change in self-rated driving ability or exposure. Female gender (p = .03) was a significant predictor of subsequent lower self-rated driving ability. Overall, the findings of this study provide support for the role of feedback in the self-monitoring of older adults' driving behavior through avoidance of challenging driving situations but not through driving exposure or self-rated driving ability.

 

Link to PubMed