Jean Kelley Lecture - Save the Date - June 8, 2016
Post-Doc Deborah Ejem explores link between spirituality, health care
Professor David Vance awarded five-year, $2.86-million grant by NIMH
Bowen receives grant for health policy research
PhD students Bahorski, Soistmann receive Ireland Research Travel Award
ONS, HPNA honor Bakitas as palliative care leader
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Improving the health of older African American men in the Deep South

Cognitive prescriptions.

Vance DE, Eagerton G, Harnish B, McKie P, Fazeli PL.

School of Nursing, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA. devance@uab.edu

Abstract

Nonpathological cognitive declines occur with aging and negatively affect everyday functioning and reduce quality of life. Many older adults, aware of such cognitive changes, seek ways to bolster their cognitive functioning. Evidence based on the cognitive aging literature supports a number of factors associated with cognitive functioning. These factors include physical exercise, intellectual exercise, nutrition, sleep hygiene, social interaction, and mood and emotional state. These factors can be manipulated and woven together by nurses and other health professionals to develop an easy-to-use, non-invasive cognitive prescription for improving the cognitive health of older adults. An example and directions for developing and implementing cognitive prescriptions are described.

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 Link to PubMed