Transforming veterans health care through academic-practice partnerships

Harper DC, Moore RL, Cleveland C, Miltner RS, Froelich K, McGuinness T, Waldrop J, Fogger S, Davis AH,Selleck CS.

Abstract

The Veterans Health Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations (OAA) has invested in the creation of academic-practice partnerships to transform the care of veterans and their families. This article details how a long-standing relationship between the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing and the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center grew into such a partnership. The three programs that now exist within the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Nursing Academic Partnership (VANAP) umbrella are described, including an undergraduate VA nurse scholars program that has sustained beyond OAA funding, a VANAP graduate education program for psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (NPs), and a Mental Health NP Residency. Key features of the programs are noted as are outcomes and lessons learned for building mutual goals and a sustainable academic-practice partnership. With the recent passage of the Veterans Choice Program, the importance of educating all nurses about veterans' and veterans health is stressed.

Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


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Adolescents Who Self-Injure.

McGuinness TM, Durand SC.

Abstract

Children and adolescents engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) at a much higher frequency than parents and caregivers may estimate. This form of self-injury has long been distinguished from suicide, with distinct risk factors and comorbidities for each behavior. Although the outcome of NSSI is less devastating than suicide, adolescents who self-injure are suffering. Adolescents live and move within a particular context and view the world from a unique developmental perspective. Treatment should proceed from alliance with the patient and an understanding of the context in which he/she lives. Modifiable risk factors have been identified and several treatments are shown to reduce frequency of self-injury. Some interventions have been shown to actually increase distress. Nurses are in a position to identify adolescents who self-injure and connect the whole family system to appropriate effective intervention. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(4), 26-29.].
Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

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Update on Anxiety Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence.

McGuinness TM, Durand SC.

Abstract

Despite significant progress in understanding anxiety disorders in youth, affected children are often unrecognized and never receive adequate treatment recognition. Although common among children and adolescents, many parents and health care providers do not realize anxiety disorders in youth predict anxiety disorders in adulthood. The history of anxiety disorders in childhood and their continuity into adolescence and adulthood are discussed. Treatment options and best practices for psychiatric nurses are also explored. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54 (6), 25-28.].

Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

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A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

Jukkala AM, Miltner RS, Morrison SL, Gisiger-Camata S, Todd A, Moneyharn LD, Meneses KM.

Abstract

Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession.

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