Timothy Gawne, Ph.D.

DEPARTMENT OF VISION SCIENCES

 Timothy Gawne, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Vision Sciences

Contact Information:
Office - (205) 934-5495

Physical Address:
664 Worrell Building
924 18th Street South

Mailing Address:
WORB 664
1530 Third Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35294-4390

Education

B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ph.D. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Administrative Responsibilities:

Director, Vision Science Research Center Computer Module

 

University of the Health Sciences Administrative Responsibilities:

President, Birmingham Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience

 Secondary Appointments:

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering
Associate Professor, Department of Neurobiology

Personal:

 

Scholarly Activity:

Teaching:
VIS121 Neurobiology of the Visual System - Neurobiology course for the optometry students, taught every year.

VIS450/VIS550 Electronics for Biologists - An advanced undergraduate/graduate course with the aim of making sure that biologists performing electrophysiological experiments actually know what ohm's law is, why you should use a high input-impedance amplifier in electrophysiology and which end of a soldering iron to hold on to.

VIS727 Systems Neuroscience Journal Club - graduate systems neuroscience journal club.

VIS747 Central Visual Mechanisms I - An intensive 8-week "module" designed for students in the vision science program and general neuroscience/neurobiology, covers the central visual pathways, an emphasis on primates and links between non-human primates and humans. 

Research -

The research aim in Dr. Gawne's lab is to determine how the nervous system codes and processes information. The primary method used is recording from single neurons and small groups of single neurons in the visual system, primarily the visual cortical system but also in thalamus and retina. There are also ongoing projects using recording of the visual evoked potential in human subjects to look for correlates of the results found with single unit recording.  Dr. Gawne makes heavy use of computational and engineering techniques in this research.  For more information please check out the personal web site link below.

Publications


Additional Information:

Personal Web Site