Benefits to Postdoctoral Scholars vary according to the type of appointment. Due to IRS restrictions placed on non-taxed fellowships, retirement benefits are not allowed for Postdoc Trainees (Status Code 20). VIVA Health Insurance coverage is provided at no cost to the Postdoc with the option of purchasing the dental and vision portion of the insurance plan. Because of their unique status as “Trainees” who do not receive a salary but rather a stipend, these Postdocs are eligible for student housing.

Postdoc Employees (Status Code 21), because of their employee-employer relationship with the University, receive a salary. They also are provided VIVA Health Insurance coverage paid through the University with the option of purchasing the dental and vision portion of the insurance plan. Status Code 21 postdocs are not eligible for student housing.

Benefits Eligibility Table

Employment Category

Status Code

UAB paid Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance

Employee paid Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance

 

Postdoctoral Scholar Trainee

20

Yes

Yes*

 

Postdoctoral Scholar Employee

21

Yes

Yes*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employment Category

Status Code

TIAA-CREF Retirement

Viva Health Insurance

Dental and Vision Insurance

UAB paid Group Term Life Insurance

Postdoctoral Scholar Trainee

20

No

Yes

Yes*

Yes

Postdoctoral Scholar Employee

21

Yes

Matched up to 5% of salary

Yes

Yes*

Yes

*Individual pays premium


University Paid Benefits

  • Viva Health Insurance - VIVA Health is the health care plan provided for Postdoctoral Trainees (status code 20) and Postdoctoral Employees (status code 21). The premium for either single or family coverage is paid by the University. Coverage under UAB's group health care plan must be elected on either the first day of appointment or the first day of the month following the date of appointment. The Postdoc has 31 days from their starting date to complete hospital insurance forms either by participating in UAB New Hire Orientation or by scheduling an appointment with the Benefits Department. Some form of health insurance coverage is mandatory and proof of insurance is required if the University's health insurance is not elected. VIVA Health also covers medical evacuation and repatriation of remains for International Postdoctoral Scholars.
  • Group Term Life InsuranceProvided at no cost to the employee; varies with salary. (Sponsored)
  • Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance - $22,500.00 for accidental death; dismemberment coverage varies. Provided at no cost to the employee. (Sponsored)
  • Long Term Disability Insurance (Salary Continuation) – After a 90-Day waiting period, 66 2/3% monthly salary (not to exceed $10,000.00 per month) for the first 90 days of benefits. After 90 days of continued benefits, plan pays 60% monthly salary (not to exceed $10,000.00 per month). Proved at no cost to the employee. (Sponsored)
  • Retirement Plan – Teachers’ Retirement System of Alabama (TRS) – The Teachers’ Retirement System of Alabama (TRS) is a defined pension benefit plan (a specific benefit available upon retirement). Postdoctoral Employee Status 21 are only eligible to participate in this mandatory program. Employees contribute a percentage of their gross monthly tax-sheltered contributions up to the IRS 401(a) annual earnable compensation maximum. In addition to the employee contribution, the University contributes a percentage (as determined by the Alabama Legislature) of the institution’s total payroll. An employee is considered vested when 10 years of creditable service is earned. The program offers the individual a choice as to the distribution of the total deposit to be placed between TIAA/CREF and VALIC for investments.

Voluntary Employee Paid Benefits

  • Postdoctoral Met Life Dental Basic Option - Preventive and diagnostic are covered at 90% UCR. Basic services are covered at 90% UCR subject to a $25.00 deductible. The Postdoc will pay a monthly premium for single or family coverage.
  • Postdoctoral Met Life Dental Comprehensive Option - In addition to the basic dental benefits, the comprehensive plan covers major services at 60% UCR subject to the deductible. Orthodontic services are covered at 50% of UCR up to a $1,000.00 per patient lifetime maximum. The Postdoc pays the full monthly premium for single or family coverage.
  • Vision Service Plan (VSP) Vision Plan – The VSP plan offers employees coverage for routine eye exams, lenses and frames, contacts, and discounts for LAKIK eye surgery. The Postdoc pays the full monthly premium for single or for family coverage.
  • Group Universal Life Insurance Coverage - Maximum Coverage – Up to five times your Basic Annual Earnings, not to exceed $1.4 million.Guaranteed Issue - Three (3) times salary, not to exceed $500,000.00 during first 60 days of employment without evidence of insurability. Individual pays full premium. Rates vary based on age.
  • Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance - Maximum Coverage – lesser of 10 times your basic annual earnings or $500,000.00. Individual pays full premium. Rates vary based on coverage level.            

Other Benefits

  • Social Security - Taxes and benefits established by the U.S. Government
  • Unemployment Compensation Insurance (paid by the University)
  • On-the-Job Injury/Illness Program(paid by the University)
  • Legacy Community Federal Credit Union Credit Card - The Office of Postdoctoral Education is very happy to announce that the Legacy Community Federal Credit Union will offer the opportunity to obtain a credit card to newly-arrived foreign nationals. A Postdoc should go to either of the locations near UAB – 1400 South 20th Street or 516 South 20th Street to open an account for as little as $25.00. The application requires a social security number, the Letter of Offer showing salary and start date, and another identification such a passport, driver’s license, or US government or military ID.
  • Loan - Another service that the Legacy Community Federal Credit Union can provide for Postdocs is help with unplanned cash flow shortages. A new UAB Postdoc can exhaust their available funds quickly when paying deposits on rent, utilities, etc. and may require a small loan to tide him or her over until they are in the UAB system and receive a paycheck. The Legacy Community Federal Credit Union again can help with this problem. Open an account with them for as little as $25.00, provide an ID as mentioned previously, social security number, Letter of Offer, complete the application and they will begin the process. The Legacy Community Federal Credit Union will not eliminate anyone from their services because of lack of credit history, but will need to know, as all financial institutions do, that an individual’s ability to repay a loan or pay a credit card bill is not hindered from excessive debt. They will need documentation showing salary and have agreed to accept the letter of offer as proof. The application for a loan or credit card will ask about any debt amount owed. After comparison of these two figures, they will determine qualification and notify the applicant about the requested service. For a Foreign National Postdoc acquiring the necessary credit history for a credit card can sometimes take years so we believe that this is a wonderful opportunity for newly arrived Postdocs and are very happy to present this offer to you from the Legacy Community Federal Credit Union.

LEAVE POLICIES

Vacation Leave- Six months after the effective appointment date, all Postdoctoral Scholars are eligible for ten (10) paid working days per year. Vacation days do not accrue and cannot be carried over from year to year. All requests for vacation leave should be made in writing and must be approved by the direct supervisor. Postdoctoral Scholars and their supervisors are responsible for maintaining appropriate records.

Sick Leave
- Ten (10) paid working days per year. Sick leave should not be used as vacation. Sick days do not accrue and cannot be carried over from year to year.

Maternity/Paternity Leave - Twenty-two (22) paid successive working days immediately following or just prior to birth or adoption of a child. If both spouses are employed as Postdoctoral Scholars, each one is eligible for a consecutive term of maternity/paternity leave. Additional, non-paid leave, following the provisions of the Family Medical Leave Act, must be requested and approved by the supervisor.

COUNSELING

Career Counseling - Jami Armbrester, MS, is available by appointment in the OPE office in Shelby 171A to meet with Postdocs and GBS students. Jami is available for one-hour, confidential, one-on-one career counseling. With individualized career counseling, she can help you:

  • Clarify and define your career goals
  • Research and explore career options
  • Identify your strengths and weakness
  • Implement a plan for skills development
  • Develop an effective self-marketing campaign, including job search materials (i.e., CV, resume, cover letter)
  • Prepare for upcoming interviews (academic and industry)

To schedule an appointment with Jami, please contact the UAB Office of Postdoctoral Education, (205) 934-6809 or email JamiA@uab.edu .

Health and Wellness Counseling:

The Resource Center – An Employee Assistance/Counseling Service is provided by UAB as a benefit to all employees. All Postdoctoral Scholars are eligible for this confidential service (205) 934-2281.

Campus Counseling - (205) 934-3779, is a non-UAB affiliation, but is open to anyone. It is a non-profit organization that offers front line counseling by appointment. Hours are 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.

Motorist Assistance Road Services (M.A.R.S.) - Motorist Assistance Road Services “M.A.R.S” is a service provided by Parking Services free of charge. The service is set up to help any employee or student having car trouble on campus.  Services include retrieving keys, jump starting cars, inflating tires, and assisting if you are out of gas.  M.A.R.S. employees are not mechanics, but they will do their very best to assist you and get you on your way. If they are unable to provide assistance then they will help you find someone who can. Telephone number: (205) 975-MARS (975-6277)

CAREER DEVELOPMENT COURSES

OPE Courses

Each year, the UAB Office of Postdoctoral Education sponsors courses in Lab Management (Fall), Grant Writing (Winter), Translational Science (Spring), and Job Skills (Summer). These courses are open to all UAB Postdoctoral Scholars. Please see the OPE website or contact OPE office for more detail about these courses.

Lab Management will introduce every aspect of laboratory management. Throughout the course, participants are expected to write and present a laboratory management plan to the class. This course is open to Postdoctoral Scholars in any discipline. In general, the class meets two hours every week from September to November. Course enrollment is limited to 25 participants.

Grant Writing Course will introduce every aspect of grant writing to Postdoctoral Scholars and will be instructed by successful grant writers. Throughout the course, participants are expected to write a grant application. All grants will be criqued by participating Faculty in a mock study section formal. This course is open to Postdoctoral Scholars in any discipline in which extramural individual fellowship funding is available. In general, the class meets for 2 hours every week over 10 weeks.

Translational Medicine Course for M.D. and Ph.D. Scholars will introduce every aspect of preparing and conducting a clinical and translational science research program, including program design, data analysis, and regulatory requirements. It will be instructed by both physician-scientists and Ph.D. Scientists. Throughout the course, participants will be encouraged to design a pilot clinical and translational project using team-based approach. All projects will be critiqued by participating Faculty. This course is open to M.D. and Ph.D. Postdoctoral Scholars in all disciplines. The class will meet every week for 2 hours a week TBA. Course enrollment is limited to 25 participants.

Job Skills Course will introduce every aspect of preparing for and completing a job search, including career options, preparing CVs and resumes, and interviewing skills. This course is open to Trainees, including Postdoctoral Scholars and senior graduate students, in any discipline. Throughout the course, participants are expected to: 1. Attend each class; 2. Participate in class discussions; and 3. Develop a job search strategy. This class meets for 2 hours each week during the summer TBA. Enrollment is NOT Limited. Class topics will include: Academic and Non-academic Career Options, Preparing CVs and Resumes, and Interviewing and Negotiating Skills.

Professional Development Courses

The Office of Postdoctoral Education encourages Postdoctoral Scholars to take advantage of the many classes and seminars offered through the Professional Development Office. The OPE will pay tuition and fee costs for up to six hours of credit for a Postdoc per year. A complete listing of these courses can be found on the OPE web page at www.uab.edu/postdocs/ under Career Resources, or by going directly to the Professional Development web page at www.uab.edu/profdev. Regular credit classes as well as additional non-credit classes are available to Postdocs as long as the course will enhance career and professional development for the Postdoc.

All courses to be sponsored by the OPE must be approved prior to registration. Once a course has been decided upon, the Postdoctoral Scholar must contact Linda R. Luck by email at lluck@uab.edu or call (205) 975-7020 for approval. Upon approval to take the course, the Office of Postdoctoral Education will notify the Postdoc of the correct method to register for that particular class

In most cases, OPE will handle your registration. Please send your request with Course Title, Number, and CRN to Linda R. Luck prior to the open registration period to allow time for processing and avoid late fees. ‘

Any request to take addition hours in a calendar year must be approved by OPE prior to registration. Your request, with the rationale for this course as a benefit to your professional development, should be submitted to Dr. Lisa Schwiebert with a copy to Linda R. Luck.


Postdocs in UAB News

  • Floyd named president-elect of National Neurotrauma Society

    UAB’s Candace Floyd is set to take a top leadership post with the National Neurotrauma Society.

    Candace Floyd, Ph.D., associate professor in the University of Alabama at BirminghamDepartment of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, is the president-elect of the National Neurotrauma Society. The president-elect will assume the duties of president in June 2016 for a one-year term. Floyd previously served terms as vice president and secretary/treasurer.

    The National Neurotrauma Society seeks to accelerate research that will provide answers for clinicians and ultimately improve the treatments available to patients. It is open to scientists interested in neurotrauma research and promotes excellence in the field by providing opportunities for scientists, establishing standards in both basic and clinical research, encouraging and supporting research, and promoting liaisons with other organizations that influence the care and cure of neurotrauma victims.

    Floyd is the holder of the Women’s Committee of Spain Rehabilitation Center Endowed Chair in Rehabilitation Neuroscience Research and the director of Research for the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The central focus of her research is to develop new treatments for spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury.

    She earned her doctorate from the Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University and did postdoctoral training in traumatic central nervous system injury research at the University of California, Davis. She joined UAB in 2006.

    She serves as grant reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Her research is currently supported by the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health and private organizations including the National Football League.

  • A researcher in motion, chasing trials and trails
    Epidemiologist Olivia Affuso studies new ways to prevent obesity and chronic disease through physical activity. She also volunteers with two groups that use running to help women and girls achieve fitness and personal goals.

    As a member of UAB’s Nutrition Obesity Research Center and Center for Exercise Medicine, Olivia Affuso, Ph.D., has a clear goal: preventing obesity and chronic disease through physical activity. During many of her evenings and weekends, she helps women and girls put these ideas into practice.

    Affuso, an associate professor of epidemiology in the UAB School of Public Health, has developed a patent-pending, photography-based method that could change the way obesity interventions are measured. She is also a board member of the Birmingham Council of Girls on the Run, an international organization that uses running “to inspire girls to be joyful, healthy and confident,” Affuso said.

    Girls on the Run Birmingham has served more than 1,000 girls in third through fifth grades at schools around the Birmingham area since 2011. The program, which combines group runs and lessons on everything from bullying to teamwork, “is for every girl,” Affuso said. “We use running as a creative, fun activity to help the girls learn to establish goals and healthy habits.”

    Finding your own happy pace

    During each Girls on the Run season, in spring and fall, Affuso and the group’s other board members “adopt” the teams at participating schools. Each team is led by volunteer teachers and coaches from the school; in spring 2015, there were 17 teams at 14 sites. Affuso usually volunteers for the long-distance treks, bringing a small token of appreciation for the coaches and a healthy snack for the students. “For the past few seasons, I’ve worked with a team in Sylacauga, and with the Boys and Girls Club team in Montevallo,” she said. “I am willing to drive wherever I am needed to support the girls.” At the end of each season, the teams gather for a 5-kilometer race. This spring, nearly 260 girls from the program completed their goal at Veterans Park in Hoover, along with friends and others from their communities.

    Girls on the Run isn’t about competition, Affuso said: “Everyone is encouraged to go at her own happy pace.” When she runs on her own, Affuso pushes harder. Since taking up the sport as a master’s student at Georgia State University, she has steadily increased her mileage, completing her first marathon in 1999. In March 2014, she attempted her first 100-mile race, Alabama’s Lake Martin 100. Bad weather forced the vast majority of participants to drop out; Affuso made it 62 miles before stopping. However, she conquered the 100-mile challenge this past September at a race in Michigan, finishing in 29 hours and 17 minutes. Her goal is to complete a 50-kilometer trail race in all 50 states.

    Curves and computation

    In her lab, Affuso is tackling another daunting challenge. In this case, the hurdles are technical — is it possible to use simple photos to accurately estimate a person’s body composition? Studies examining obesity interventions generally use body mass index (BMI) to determine whether participants are successful at losing weight. To measure BMI, all you need is a participant’s height and weight and a calculator. But this simple formula is also imprecise. People with lots of muscles may appear overweight, for instance, and those who are tall can appear normal or even underweight, when they actually have too much body fat. A much more accurate way to measure body composition is the DXA (pronounced dex-a) scan, but these expensive machines are not portable and aren’t widely available for clinical or field research.

    Affuso had an idea for a better approach. Previous studies had shown that trained DXA technicians could accurately guess a person’s body composition before they were ever measured by the machine. Affuso wanted to see if she could mimic that judgment using digital photographs and some advanced computer algorithms. Her initial project was funded by Max Michael, M.D., dean of the School of Public Health, in the school’s annual Back of the Envelope Awards competition. After a successful pilot test with that funding, Affuso is now in the fourth year of a five-year, $2.5 million NIH study to test the idea at scale. The Photobody study is enrolling 2,000 men and women, ages 6–70. To help the computer detect body contours, men have to wear spandex shorts, and women wear shorts and a close-fitting top. Eventually, Affuso hopes to have the system work with minimal everyday clothes. (Learn more about the work in this UAB Magazine feature.)

    “We know the process works,” Affuso said. “Now we’re breaking it down to questions like, How well does it work with women in a certain age group, or with different racial/ethnic groups?”

    The power of nudges

    Affuso recently launched a new technology-based study exploring movement and motivation. She is recruiting both college-age women ages 19–30 and girls ages 8–11 in order to study their responses to new wearable activity trackers, like the popular Fitbit bands. (Her study is using the MovBand, primarily because of its objective measurement of physical activity and long battery life, she says.) Affuso wants to know whether participants will actually use the devices in their daily lives. Then she plans to see whether the immediate feedback the trackers give on activity can help the women and girls stay more active. “What we want to do is reduce the amount of time they’re being sedentary,” Affuso said. “Even if someone exercises 30 minutes per day, if they spend the rest of the time being sedentary, they’re likely to have negative health effects.”

    Affuso plans to create challenges that indirectly get participants to move regularly, “without saying explicitly, ‘You need to walk more’ or ‘You need to go for a run,’” she said. “It’s using the behavioral economics model of nudging.”

    Community in motion

    At the end of the workday, Affuso hits the trails — often in the company of runners from one of many groups in Birmingham. Since 2011, she has been involved with the national organization Black Girls Run, which encourages black women to run by building a safe, supportive community. She was one of the founding ambassadors of the group’s Birmingham affiliate, which was the first in Alabama. “We started with 10 people, and now we have more than 4,600 women on our Facebook page,” Affuso said. “We have at least seven opportunities to run during the week here in Birmingham,” she added, and there are also groups running in Anniston, Tuscaloosa, Huntsville and Montgomery. “The success of this group relies heavily on the tireless volunteers and dedicated runners,” Affuso said.

    The members of Black Girls Run also help to support the Girls on the Run participants by serving as running buddies during the annual 5K race, or becoming “SoleMates” — raising money by asking people to sponsor them for a race. “It can be any running event,” Affuso said. For her SoleMate challenge, she chose the Leadville Marathon in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, which involves climbing “to over 13,000 feet of lung-crushing elevation,” she said.

    Charting a course to Birmingham

    Affuso, who is originally from Orangeburg, South Carolina, earned a master’s degree in sports nutrition at Georgia State University and a Ph.D. in nutritional epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “I was very interested in the interaction between diet and physical activity in the prevention of chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes,” she said. “While at Georgia State University, I worked on projects with elite athletes as well as community-based interventions — both of which included a diet and exercise component.”

    In 1999, as she started her doctoral work in Chapel Hill, Affuso met UAB’s David Allison, Ph.D., at a conference, and the two researchers kept up with each others’ work. In 2006, after Affuso finished a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Miami, Allison invited her to give a seminar at the UAB Nutrition Obesity Research Center. “I had never visited Alabama and wasn’t thinking about moving here,” she said, “but once I came and saw the resources that UAB had available and the opportunity and the entrepreneurial spirit, it turned out this was a good place for me to be.”

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UAB Research News

  • Meet the Most Influential: Art Tipton, Southern Research
    ipton plans to continue SRI’s work in drug development, the defense world and clean energy, while also increasing collaboration with UAB and boosting commercialization efforts from the research that takes place at the institute.
  • UAB School of Education reaches major milestones in strategic, broad approach to transforming lives
    The School of Education looks to enhance learning outcomes, health and wellness of P-12 population, as well as of adults in Alabama and around the world.

    Deborah Voltz, EdD, Dean, School of Education, helps high school student during Innovative Learning Collaborative pilot program at Parker High School.Since establishing the initial framework of its strategic plan in 2011, the UAB School of Education has refined goals and objectives and is concentrating efforts around several areas through 2017.

    “The School of Education is working to impact human potential more broadly,” said Dean Deborah L. Voltz, Ed.D. “We recognize that there is a symbiotic relationship between health and education. This is reflected in excellence in faculty research and programs that give students the training and knowledge to enhance P-12 education and health and wellness for individuals in Alabama and around the world.”

    The school’s focus through 2017 includes strengthening enrollment, enhancing student support services, expanding online program offerings, increasing external funding, and increasing the number of educators prepared to work in high-poverty schools and in high-needs areas such as math, science, special education and English as a second language.

    “The UAB School of Education plays a very important role in improving the quality of education in Alabama, a goal to which the school is extremely dedicated,” said UAB President Ray L. Watts. “With Dean Voltz’s leadership, faculty, staff, students and supporters are working together in innovative ways to make a substantial impact on education in our community and beyond.”

    Innovation in teaching

    The school saw a highly successful first year with its UABTeach program, far surpassing enrollment expectations and receiving significant philanthropic support. Designed to quickly produce a new teaching force of highly qualified instructors in science, technology, engineering and math, the program allows undergraduate STEM majors to receive a subject-matter degree and certification to teach at the secondary level within a four-year graduation plan. The program enrolled 70 freshman and sophomore students last fall. It is the only program of its kind in Alabama and will graduate its first class in 2017.

    Opportunities for School of Education students also extend overseas, as UAB is the only university in the state to partner with the Peace Corps. Students looking to combine graduate school with the Peace Corps can do so as Peace Corps Master’s International students in the School of Education, with 14 PCMI master’s degree options. PCMI students complete most of their courses at UAB and spend two years overseas as volunteers working in a career related to their master’s degree.

    A new honors program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and an existing program in the Department of Human Studies give students the opportunity to collaborate with faculty to pursue their intellectual interests through research or a service project designed to address a particular societal need as it relates to their field of study.

    Other exciting new degree programs are emerging in the school. The UA System Board of Trustees recently approved a doctoral program in educational studies in diverse populations, and a master’s option in school psychometry. The school’s online degree offerings have also grown from two to five fully online programs.

    Supporting its exceptional programs is the School of Education’s Office of Student Services, which is developing innovative new initiatives to help students reach their educational goals. The office has developed a new proactive advising model to assist undergraduate students in identifying academic challenges early in their academic careers and utilizing appropriate resources to address those challenges. Additional initiatives to further enhance student services are on the horizon.

    The strength of the school’s programs is reflected in the success of its alumni. School of Education alumni have been named Alabama Teacher of the Year — the top teacher in the state — for the last three years, and one has gone on to be a finalist for the national award — one of four top teachers in the country.

    The strength of the school’s programs is reflected in the success of its alumni. School of Education alumni have been named Alabama Teacher of the Year — the top teacher in the state — for the last three years, and one has gone on to be a finalist for the national award — one of four top teachers in the country.

    Innovation in research

    In 2014, the school was awarded a seven-year, $49 million grant by the U.S. Department of Education to increase the number of low-income students prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. The Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant provides funding to states to enhance services for students, parents and teachers at high-poverty middle and high schools.

    UAB serves as the hub of GEAR UP Alabama, which will impact about 10,450 students from 18 school districts and 53 schools in Alabama’s Black Belt. The program will work with a cohort of students in either sixth or seventh grade and follow them through their first year of college.

    With the help of a philanthropic gift from AT&T Alabama, the UAB Innovative Learning Collaborative launched a pilot program with Birmingham City Schools’ Parker High. UAB education students worked with 50 students from Parker High School’s Academy of Urban Educators to better engage them in the learning process and improve their writing skills. One area tested by the program is the use of tablet computers preloaded with reading and writing tools.

    A recent $1.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education will assist the school’s early childhood special education program in preparing students, through an interdisciplinary program of study, for careers as early interventionists to improve services and results for young children with disabilities and their families throughout Alabama. The program will provide full scholarships to 14 scholars each year for five years in order to address a state shortage of highly qualified personnel in this area.

    The school is focused not only on enhancing learning outcomes for the P-12 population in Alabama and around the world, but also on improving health and wellness for people of all ages. Recently funded research in the school’s Department of Human Studies ranges from exploring family counseling-based approaches to childhood obesity and the effects of aerobic exercise training and exercise intensity in premenopausal women to exploring women’s emotional barriers to exercise.

    Innovation in service

    Keeping with the university’s mission, the School of Education continues to be active in service.

    Renovations are complete for the school’s recently established Maryann Manning Family Literary Center, and plans for its grand opening are underway. The center was established in 2014 to honor and continue the work of longtime faculty member Maryann Manning, Ed.D. The center brings together expertise from many areas of literacy to provide services for children and families throughout the state, regionally and globally.

    Planning for next year’s Girls in Science in Engineering Day is underway. GSED is a unique, free event created by two UAB students in 2011 to inspire and empower Birmingham-area middle school girls to achieve and excel in science and engineering fields. It is a day for local middle school girls to come to UAB and participate in fun science and engineering activities led by women who are professors, scientists and students from UAB and the surrounding community.

    Since 2011, the UAB Community Counseling Clinic, housed in the School of Education building, has filled a service gap for people in Jefferson County by providing low-cost mental health counseling. The center sees an average of 112 patients a year and partners with more than 60 community organizations and agencies for referrals. The clinic is run by School of Education faculty. Services are provided by advanced graduate students and supervised by doctoral-level faculty. The clinic is working to expand its outreach within the community.

    The school looks to create new partnerships and strengthen existing ones to develop innovative approaches for addressing areas of critical need locally and beyond.

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