Compensation Guidelines

All mentors at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are strongly encouraged to follow the National Institutes of Health, National Research Service Award (NRSA) stipend level guidelines.

The current compensation amounts for years of experience can be found at

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-14-046.html

If it is impossible to fund according to the NRSA guidelines, the minimum starting salary at UAB is $35,190.00 (effective Oct. 1, 2011) plus benefits.

 

UAB News

  • Established by Birmingham artist Amy Pleasant, Rapid Fire Birmingham gathers the city’s creative professionals for informal presentations, idea sharing and creative conversation.Rapid Fire, a gathering of artists and thinkers designed to help build community and foster dialogue, will be hosted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Art and Art History on Friday, Sept. 5. Established by Amy Pleasant, a Birmingham native and internationally renowned artist, Rapid Fire gathers Birmingham creative professionals from a...

  • Alabama employment numbers saw a slight bump from June 2013 to June 2014 with the addition of 5,200 jobs, according to data from the Center For Business and Economic Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

UAB Research News

  • UAB researchers are investigating game-based verification that may improve computer security and reduce user frustration compared to typical “type-what-you-see” CAPTCHA tools that use static images.CAPTCHA services that require users to recognize and type in static distorted characters may be a method of the past, according to studies published by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. CAPTCHAs represent a security mechanism that is often seen as a necessary hassle by Web services providers — necessary...

  • UAB Distinguished Professor’s editorial highlights research efforts exploring low-sodium intake guidelines and implications on cardiac disease and mortality.Recent studies suggest national dietary guidelines for sodium intake are unrealistic, and that the recommended level of sodium could be associated with a higher risk of cardiac disease and mortality. In an invited New England Journal of Medicine editorial, “Low Sodium — Cardiovascular Health Benefit or Risk?” University of Alabama at Birmingham Distinguished Professor of Medicine Suzanne Oparil, M.D.,...