K11020—Medicine - Atherosclerosis Research Unit

Contact:

Mentor: Jere P. Segrest, M.D. Professor Mailing address: BDB 630 1530 3RD AVENUE S BIRMINGHAM AL 35294-0012 Telephone: (205) 934-4070 Fax: (205) 975-8079 E-mail :segrest@uab.edu


A Postdoctoral Fellowship is available for a Physical Chemist/Biochemist/Structural Biologist to study detailed molecular structures of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I on high density lipoprotein (HDL). Focus is on pathways for in vivo assembly of cholesteryl ester (CE)-rich (spheroidal) HDL, including the structure/dynamics of phospholipid (PL)-poor (preß) and PL-rich (discoidal) HDL. The driving hypothesis is that apoA-I is a uniquely elastic lipid-clamp capable of absorbing PL and CE in increments of a few molecules at a time. Because of a recent demonstration by our lab of the power of MD simulations to provide supramolecular images of HDL, experimental approaches combined with MD simulations uniquely position us to gain fundamental new insights into the structure/function of HDL subspecies. Candidates should have obtained a Ph.D. degree within the past 3 years with a strong background in physicochemistry, biochemistry and structural biology. A highly motivated and independent scientist able to work within an interdisciplinary team is preferred. E-mail research summary, CV, and 3 references to: Jere P. Segrest: segrest@uab.edu 

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