I13003—Health Services/Comparative Effectiveness Research Training Program (HSR/CERTP)

Contact:

Mentors: Kenneth Saag, MD, MSc, PD/PI and Monika Safford, MD, Co-Directors.  For questions regarding eligibility, program requirements and the application process, please contact Ryan Outman routman@uab.edu.

The Health Services/Comparative Effectiveness Research Training Program (HSR/CERTP) at UAB  is a combined fellowship mentored research training program in health services & outcomes research and comparative effectiveness research (Kenneth Saag, MD, MSc, PD/PI; Monika Safford, MD, Co-Director). The training program prepares independent investigators to pursue careers in health services & outcomes research focused on translating research evidence into practice and on comparative effectiveness research methods for evaluating the benefits and harms of different treatment strategies and interventions health conditions on patient outcomes in real world settings. Skills development will include exposure to relevant epidemiological, statistical, experimental, and quasi-experimental methodologies, analysis of large data sets, health outcomes assessment, and economic evaluation, all with an emphasis on the practical application of outcomes research methodology. Our research and training base includes a partnership of UAB interdisciplinary research centers and programs and is primarily drawn from across 7 UAB Schools (Medicine, Public Health, Health Professions, Nursing, Dentistry, Business, and College of Arts and Science), offering a pool of almost 25 experienced HSR/CER Mentors.

CONTACT: For questions regarding eligibility, program requirements and the application process, please contact Ryan Outman at routman@uab.edu. To request an application packet, please contact Joan Hargrove at jhargrove@dopm.uab.edu.

 

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