Program DirectorSuzanne Oparil, M.D. Program Director (T32HL007457, Mechanisms of Hypertension and Cardiovascular Diseases), Professor of Medicine, Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, and Director, UAB Vascular Biology and Hypertension Program of the Division of Cardiovascular Disease Mailing address: UAB Hypertension Program 703 19th Street South, ZRB 1034, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 Telephone: (205) 934-2580 Fax: (205) 975-5119  E-mail:

 Postdoctoral Positions Available

Postdoctoral positions funded through an NRSA training grant are currently available to MD and PhD prepared trainees for careers in clinical and translational, and fundamental research in hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, including obesity and metabolic diseases (diabetes).

Opportunities are available in clinical and translational research in the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity and in fundamental research in cell signaling, including mechanosensing and mechanosignal transduction; molecular and cellular mechanisms of angiogenesis and vascular response to injury; vasoactive peptides in systemic and pulmonary hypertension; CNS regulation of blood pressure; molecular pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac failure, arrhythmia and sudden death; pathophysiology and treatment of clinical hypertension, free radicals, oxidative injury and antioxidants in cardiopulmonary diseases; and molecular genetics of hypertension.

Application Requirements : The candidate must be a US citizen or permanent resident. Candidate must have a M.D. or Ph.D. with an interest in cardiovascular diseases. The position is available for one year with the expectation of renewal pending program director and postdoc's mentor recommendation. Successful candidates should demonstrate a strong commitment to a research career. Individuals are invited to send a current CV, a letter indicating an interest and describing research accomplishments and plans, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Suzanne Oparil,E-mail:

Funding Available : Amount of award is dependent upon applicant's experience and follows the NIH guidelines.

Postdocs in UAB News

  • King crabs threaten Antarctic ecosystem due to warming ocean
    Predators’ arrival could radically alter marine life

    The king crab Paralomis birsteini, photographed on the continental slope off Marguerite Bay, Antarctica, at a depth of 1100 m.King crabs may soon become high-level predators in Antarctic marine ecosystems where they have not played a role in tens of millions of years, according to a new study on which University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers worked in conjunction with the Florida Institute of Technology and other institutions.

    “No Barrier to Emergence of Bathyal King Crabs on the Antarctic Shelf,” published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, ties the reappearance of these crabs to global warming.

    This study is a continuation of previous work in the field of Antarctic marine ecology done by James McClintock, Ph.D., paper co-author and professor in UAB’s College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology, along with his colleagues.

    “The rising temperature of the ocean west of the Antarctic Peninsula — one of the most rapidly warming places on the planet — should make it possible for king crab populations to move to the shallow continental shelf from their current deep-sea habitat within the next several decades,” said lead author Richard Aronson, Ph.D., professor and head of Florida Tech’s Department of Biological Sciences.

    Researchers found no barriers, such as salinity levels, types of sediments on the seafloor or food resources, to prevent the predatory crustaceans from arriving if the water became warm enough. That arrival would have a huge impact.

    “Because other creatures on the continental shelf have evolved without shell-crushing predators, if the crabs moved in they could radically restructure the ecosystem,” Aronson said.

    Nathaniel B. Palmer in the ice off Marguerite Bay.The study provides initial data and does not by itself prove that crab populations will expand into shallower waters.

    “The only way to test the hypothesis that the crabs are expanding their depth-range is to track their movements through long-term monitoring,” McClintock said.

    In the 2010 to 2011 Antarctic summer, in research funded by the National Science Foundation, the team used an underwater camera sled to document a reproductive population of the crabs for the first time on the continental slope off Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula. That area is only a few hundred meters deeper than the continental shelf where the delicate ecosystem flourishes.

    “The mounting anticipation as the researchers watched the transmissions from the seafloor culminated in a mixture of both satisfaction and unease upon the seeing the first image of a king crab on the Antarctic slope,” said Margaret Amsler, a research assistant and co-author from UAB.

    “The overall effect of the migration of king crabs to shallower waters,” said postdoctoral scientist and study co-author Kathryn Smith of Florida Institute of Technology, “would be to make the unique Antarctic ecosystem much more like ecosystems in other areas of the globe, a process ecologists call biotic homogenization.”

    SeaSled towed vehicle being deployed from the Palmer off Marguerite Bay.Such changes, the researchers concluded, would fundamentally alter the Antarctic seafloor ecosystem and diminish the diversity of marine ecosystems globally.

    The data used in the paper were collected during an expedition to Antarctica run jointly by NSF, the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat and the Swedish Research Council. The expedition included scientists from Florida Tech, UAB, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the University of Gothenburg in Sweden and the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom.

    Journalists may access the embargoed paper through EurekAlert. They should register with and request access to PNAS materials. Already registered journalists may request access to PNAS at

    A video version of this news story available by contacting Dena Headlee at or (703) 292-7739.

  • Starting strong in science
    UAB freshman Priya Shah is already a veteran in the lab. In her senior year of high school, she began a tissue-engineering project with UAB researcher Joel Berry, Ph.D., that has led to national honors — and could eventually affect patients worldwide.
    Written by Matt Windsor

    Team science: Shah is working with Joel Berry (left) and Jillian Richter (right) to create a benchtop model of atherosclerosis that could accelerate drug development. Sections of one of the team’s latest bioreactors are visible in the foreground.Priya Shah was looking for a science project. She found much more — an award-winning study, one-on-one mentoring from a veteran researcher and a leading role in a project that could eventually affect millions — all before graduating from high school.

    Shah, now a freshman at UAB and a member of the UAB Honors College’s Science and Technology Honors program, has spent the past year and a half developing a cutting-edge idea in the lab of Joel Berry, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering (a joint department of the schools of Engineering and Medicine). Working with Jillian Richter, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, the team is creating a revolutionary bioreactor — a little black box designed to accelerate the drug development process for treating atherosclerosis, the most common cause of heart disease.

    It’s a rare opportunity for any eager young scientist — one made possible by UAB’s world-class research enterprise, mentoring culture and investment in specialized programs focused on student research. “The opportunities you get here to be part of a research team and to get direct mentoring experience as early as your freshman year are pretty unusual across the country,” said Diane Tucker, Ph.D., director of the SciTech Honors program and a professor in the UAB College of Arts and Sciences Department of Psychology.

    Fearlessness and serendipity

    Last spring, Shah was getting ready for her senior year at the Alabama School of Fine Arts (ASFA). That meant she needed an independent, mentored research project — a graduation requirement for members of ASFA’s math and science track. She knew she wanted to do something in biomedical engineering, but “I also knew from previous experiences that it’s not easy to find someone to take you on,” Shah said. Undaunted, she started looking through the faculty pages on UAB’s Biomedical Engineering department site.

    Berry’s work with vascular stents caught her eye, and she sent him an email. After an initial meeting, Shah asked if he would be willing to mentor her. “He said ‘sure,’ which was shocking,” Shah said with a laugh. “I wasn’t expecting it to go so smoothly.” Berry, who is also associate director of the SciTech Honors program, has extensive experience working with promising young people who are fascinated by science. Impressed with Shah’s intelligence, maturity and “fearlessness” in talking with researchers, he had the perfect project in mind.

    Berry’s research “centers around devices implanted to replace diseased or damaged tissue in the cardiovascular system — vascular stents and tissue-engineered blood vessels,” he explained. He is also working on tissue-engineered models of breast cancer. “These models are developed from established cell lines, but will eventually be developed from cells extracted from individual patients,” Berry said. The cells are grown in a three-dimensional culture and can be kept alive for weeks at a time by a perfusion system, allowing for patient-specific testing to identify the most effective tumor treatments, he says. The engineered breast cancer research is funded by a grant from the Department of Defense. Berry will seek funding from the National Institutes of Health based on Shah’s work with the atherosclerosis project.

    A black box to tackle atherosclerosis

    Berry, who came to UAB from Wake Forest University five years ago, had an idea that combined his two research interests. He wanted to develop a tissue-engineered blood vessel — not a pristine vessel, but one filled with fatty, cholesterol-laden plaques. These are the hallmarks of atherosclerosis, “the No. 1 killer of adults in the Western world,” Berry said. An accurate benchtop model of atherosclerosis, derived from human cells, would give scientists searching for new treatments an ideal testing ground compared with the animal models currently used.

    Image of the perfusion bioreactor system used to culture engineered vascular tissue for the atherosclerosis project. A sample of the engineered tissue is seen at center.

    But Berry, occupied with his other research, hadn’t had time to develop the idea. Richter, also a biomedical engineering graduate of Wake Forest University and postdoctoral fellow at UAB, began investigating the idea with a unique imaging method known as bioluminescence. After Berry and Richter spent some time with Shah, they both realized she was up to the challenge. Shah quickly learned the process of growing cells, how to transfect them with luminescent viruses, which are used to monitor inflammation in the model arteries, and how to image them with a special camera. She also molded the tubes for the centerpiece of the project, the bioreactor: a shoebox-sized device containing three perpendicular, hollow tubes to give the cells a structure to grow on.

    Through repeated experiments, Shah and Richter figured out the best ways to induce and measure inflammation in their model system. “You don’t always have to have positive results, but you hope,” Shah said. When she let herself into the lab on a Saturday in December 2014 and saw that their final proof-of-concept experiment was a success, “I was very excited,” she said. “I texted a picture to Jillian and to all my friends. I met my family for lunch and said, ‘Guys, it worked!’”

    Building blocks of success

    Shah’s efforts have already attracted plenty of attention. She took home a first prize in the Central Alabama Regional Science and Engineering Fair (hosted at UAB), followed by a Best in Show award at the statewide Alabama Science and Engineering Fair. Shah also earned a place in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, held in Pittsburgh in May, along with students from more than 75 countries. Discussing her work in front of renowned experts “was exciting and terrifying at the same time,” Shah recalled.

    Shah was accepted into schools around the country; but UAB’s Biomedical Engineering and Honors programs, and the connections she had made on campus, clinched the deal for her hometown school. “I had two wonderful mentors, and I’ve been exposed to UAB for the past few years — it made a lot of sense for me,” she said.

    “She’s demonstrated an aptitude for science, and all of the personal attributes you need to succeed in science — independence of thought and behavior, and curiosity,” Berry said. Shah will continue to develop these attributes in the SciTech program, Tucker adds. “We work with the students throughout their time at UAB, so we can systematically introduce skills and ways of thinking and approaching problems,” Tucker said. That includes specialized training in everything from lab skills and oral presentations to submitting actual formatted NIH proposals for their research. The students also work together to develop communication and leadership skills “that will allow them to be part of teams that are solving complex problems,” Tucker said.

    “Prospective students come and talk to our current students, see what we have to offer, including substantial study abroad and service learning options, and they can visualize themselves being successful here,” Tucker added. “They sense this is a place where they will thrive.”

    Investing in ideas — and people

    As she settles in for her freshman year, Shah will continue to work on the atherosclerosis project in Berry’s lab. The team now includes two other undergraduate biomedical engineering students (and SciTech program members): Nathan Wells and Ethan Downs. “We’re continuing to gather data that we think puts us in a good position to secure grant funding,” Berry said.

    The project has also benefited from a $5,000 investment from the Invention to Innovation (i2i) initiative. This joint collaboration between the School of Engineering and the UAB Collat School of Business, led by business professor Molly Wasko, Ph.D., is designed to support just such high-potential projects. “The benchtop model of atherosclerosis is a great example of the creative work we’re trying to support here at the Collat School of Business through programs such as i2i,” Wasko said. “We believe that students can change the world when given the chance to work collaboratively with discovery scientists and business partners to accelerate science from campus to the community.” The funds have allowed the team to purchase a digital flowmeter and a pressure transducer, which will allow them to verify that their model is producing realistic blood flow and pressures.

    “This is a collaboration between multiple departments and schools at UAB — to develop an exciting project, but also to nurture an extremely bright and promising young scientist,” Berry said.

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UAB Research News

  • UAB’s Adult CF program wins national quality award
    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation recognizes UAB’s Adult CF Program with Quality Care Award.

    The Adult Cystic Fibrosis Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham has been

    selected as one of the 2015 recipients of the annual Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s Quality Care Award: Recognizing Outstanding QI Processes and Accomplishments. 

    The UAB Department of Medicine, in concert with UAB Hospital, developed the adult CF program with a team of health care personnel to provide comprehensive, evidence-based clinical care for adult patients with cystic fibrosis. The team includes nurses, nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, nutritionists, social workers and physicians, and cares for more than 180 individuals with CF.

    The program is also aligned with the UAB CF clinical trials unit and the Gregory Fleming James Cystic Fibrosis Research Center. The center is recognized internationally for its transformative clinical and basic research, including the development of new therapies for the treatment of this devastating disease.  

    “We are gratified and excited to be recognized by CFF for the quality of our care,” said Veena Antony, M.D., professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care and director of the adult CF program. “We believe this is a signature program that will identify UAB as an international destination for patient care.”

    The award marks sustained quality improvement work that improved outcomes. Performance standards include:

    • Actively using clinical outcomes data to identify opportunities for improvement and document results of improvement efforts
    • Aligning improvement efforts to result in measurable improvement in important clinical outcomes
    • Consistently and actively involving patients and families in identifying, designing and/or implementing improvement efforts
    • Employing innovative strategies to improve care processes and outcomes and implementing system changes that result in high reliability of care processes

    Working with the CFF Center Committee, the CF Foundation instituted the Quality Care Award in 2008. The awards are presented each year at the U.S. Center and Program Directors’ meeting held in conjunction with the CFF North American CF Conference. Recipients of the award are chosen by the CFF Center Committee from the Programs visited during the most recent fall and spring site visit cycles previous to NACFC. 

  • Sustainability experts considering ways to revitalize metro area
    The UAB Sustainable Smart Cities Research Center brought together green experts from around the world for the fourth annual Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium.

    More than 200 people filled the UAB Alumni House on Oct. 1 to learn from experts from around the world on matters concerning urban sustainability and development at the 2015 Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium.

    The symposium, organized by the UAB Sustainable Smart Cities Research Center, is an annual event that focuses on the innovations — such as big data, renewable energy and smart mobility — being used to help make Birmingham and other cities around the world smarter, safer and more livable.

    In opening remarks, center director Fouad H. Fouad, Ph.D., who is also chair of the School of Engineering’s Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, celebrated UAB’s collaborations with the city and called Birmingham’s new bike-share program “a big step forward for sustainability.”

    Landscape architect Thomas Woltz, who was named Design Innovator of the Year for 2013 by the Wall Street Journal, was the event’s keynote speaker. Woltz designed a blocklong park and plaza to adjoin Alabama Power Company’s Powell Avenue Steam Plant redevelopment near Railroad Park in downtown Birmingham. He said Thursday that the new plaza should evoke the Magic City’s geology, rich history and industrial heritage.

    “I hope this is a place where you can come with your children and tell stories about what you are as a city,” Woltz said.

    In designing a large public space, Woltz says he and his staff — who are collaborating with several Birmingham design and construction firms — dig deep into the history and culture of an area. In this case, they wanted to reflect Birmingham’s mineral wealth and its status as an industrial and railroad hub.

    “We want ideas that will be meaningful and relevant in a place,” Woltz said.

    Other speakers included School of Engineering Dean Iwan Alexander, Ph.D., and Birmingham Mayor William Bell, who said that the city and UAB are “in the forefront of planning for the future.”

    The city encourages developers to use LEED environmental standards in new construction, according to Bell. “In everything we do at city hall, we think about sustainability,” Bell said.

    Additional speakers:

    Rizwan Khaliq, director of Marketing and Communications for IBM Global Public Sector and Smarter Cities, discussed the link between technology and the economic competitiveness of cities around the world. He said that cities must work hard to build their brands and reputations as vital, livable places in order to attract the top, young talent they need to grow their economies.

    This is more challenging now, since employees at companies like IBM can work remotely and live wherever they want, according to Khaliq. “Birmingham is not just competing with Louisville,” he said. “You are competing with cities in China. Each locality has to think about what it stands for from a branding perspective.”

    Teresa Bouza, a journalist and the founder of Datafest, a hackathon that brings together technologists, data scientists and other experts to help solve problems in 48-hour weekend sessions, discussed the value of hackathons, which are being held all around the world. “When you bring people with diverse skills and backgrounds over just a weekend, it is incredible what they create,” she said.

    She talked about the Smart Cities Hackathon held in Birmingham in 2015, in which UAB and Auburn University took part. In one project, a group radically improved the City of Birmingham website, where buyers can search for information about the roughly 5,000 blighted properties in the city’s recently created land bank.

    Woltz, Khaliq and Bouza participated in a panel discussion about sustainability moderated by Molly Wasko, a professor at the UAB Collat School of Business. Also on the panel were Ann August, director of the Birmingham-Jefferson County Transportation Authority, and Christopher D. Hatcher, City of Birmingham urban design administrator.

    The new park on Powell Avenue will attempt to harmonize with nearby Railroad Park, making visual use of a massive smokestack on top of the old steam power plant, and will use native plants and such indigenous materials as limestone to powerfully evoke the city’s industrial past, according to Woltz. “We are trying not to just make up stuff from the outside but do things that are actually a portrait of the city,” he said.

    For more information about the Sustainable Smart Cities Research Center, call 205-996-2880 or visit

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