H13014 - Molecular & Cellular Pathology

Mentor:  Dr. Yang Yang, Associate Professor, Department of Molecular & Cellular Pathology, Wallace Tumor Institute, yangyang@uab.edu

We are currently seeking a postdoctoral fellow to study myeloma related bone disease. The candidates must be self-motivated. A strong background in bone and cancer biology is required. Experience with animal experiments is desirable. Please send your CV and a brief statement of your career goals and research interests to Dr. Yang Yang at yangyang@uab.edu.

UAB News

  • “Twitch,” a film about a young woman’s journey as she is tested for Huntington’s disease, will be previewed on campus.Kristen Powers“Twitch,” a documentary film chronicling the emotional journey of an 18-year-old as she is tested for a degenerative genetic disease, will be screened on the campus of the University of Alabama at Birmingham at 1 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Volker Hall, 1670 University Blvd. Kristen Powers, the producer and star of the film, will be...

  • Schwartz, a veteran and nurse, is the keynote speaker for this year’s Mental Health Summit, held Aug. 22.Linda S. Schwartz, nominee for assistant secretary of Veterans Affairs for Policy and Planning at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, will be the guest of the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing and the Alabama Statewide Area Health Education Center Program on Aug. 21-22 and will address staff, students and visitors as part of the...

UAB Research News

  • UAB researchers are investigating game-based verification that may improve computer security and reduce user frustration compared to typical “type-what-you-see” CAPTCHA tools that use static images.CAPTCHA services that require users to recognize and type in static distorted characters may be a method of the past, according to studies published by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. CAPTCHAs represent a security mechanism that is often seen as a necessary hassle by Web services providers — necessary...

  • UAB Distinguished Professor’s editorial highlights research efforts exploring low-sodium intake guidelines and implications on cardiac disease and mortality.Recent studies suggest national dietary guidelines for sodium intake are unrealistic, and that the recommended level of sodium could be associated with a higher risk of cardiac disease and mortality. In an invited New England Journal of Medicine editorial, “Low Sodium — Cardiovascular Health Benefit or Risk?” University of Alabama at Birmingham Distinguished Professor of Medicine Suzanne Oparil, M.D.,...