F13200 - Medicine/Infectious Diseases

Mentor: Dr. Frank Wolschendorf, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham, BBRB512, 845 19th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35294.  Telephone: (205) 975-2760; Email: fwolsche@uab.edu

A Postdoctoral position in the Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is available immediately as part of an NIH funded project. Our research is focused on the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors that act by novel mechanisms against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Staphylococcus aureus.

The innate immune system utilizes a variety of strategies to kill bacterial intruders, one of which is exposing microbes to copper ions. Copper ions accumulate specifically at the site of infection and pose a significant threat to bacterial pathogens. Thus, bacteria have evolved a variety of mechanisms to alleviate copper toxicity (PNAS: PMID 21205886).

We seek to identify compounds that enhance the antibacterial properties of copper (AAC: PMID 23254420) and thereby act in synergy to copper-dependent innate immune functions of the host. Objectives include the design and development of a novel high-throughput platform, performing automated pilot screens, the development and implementation of secondary assays for hit prioritization, and in vivo studies detailing the mode of action by which these compounds elicit their antibacterial properties.

The applicant should have a strong background in microbiology, biochemistry or related field with relevance to this project.

Applications should be submitted by email as a single PDF document that includes a cover letter, a comprehensive CV and 3 references.

Requests for further information and applications should be addressed to: Dr. Frank Wolschendorf, phone: (205) 975-2760

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