H130701 - Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Mentor: Ganesh V Halade, PhD, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham located at 703, 19th Street South, ZRB 310A, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 Telephone: (205) 996-4139 Fax: (205) 975-5150 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

A postdoctoral position is available for a highly motivated individual in the Department of medicine, division of cardiovascular disease for studies of inflammation and extracellular matrix after heart attack in the setting of obesity. Studies will focus on neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and fibroblast to interrogate cell-signaling mechanisms in primary cells by molecular biology. Mechanistic studies will be coupled with tests of physiological measurements after surgically inducing myocardial infarction in a survival mouse model. Current translational research experiments will be assayed by inflammatory and extracellular matrix array, molecular biology, histology and immunohistochemistry. Surgical, echocardiography, and histology skills are not immediately required, but essential can be learned during the course of studies. A fundamental training in molecular biology is required. The successful candidate will employ in vitro and in vivo models to examine the roles of fatty acids in post-myocardial infarction inflammation and cardiac remodeling in the setting of obesity. Responsibilities will include maintenance of complete laboratory records and execution of experimental procedures, preparation of manuscripts and presentations at internal and national meetings as required.

Qualification: The applicants must have a Ph.D. in biomedical science or other related disciplines, with strong background/expertise in one or more of the following areas: molecular biology, cell biology, and cardiac physiology. Expertise in cell culture are highly desirable, handling of laboratory animals, minor animal surgery are beneficial, but not necessary. Expertise with basic techniques utilizing DNA, RNA, protein, and tissue culture is required. Candidate need to demonstrate independence and the ability to communicate.

If interested please send a CV, names of three references, and a description of research interests and career goals (1 page) to: Elizabeth A Richards at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Or Contact

Ganesh V Halade, PhD, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham located at 703, 19th Street South, ZRB 310A, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 Telephone: (205) 996-4139 Fax: (205) 975-5150 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Consideration of applications will continue until the position is filled. The University of Alabama at Birmingham is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and encourages applications from qualified women and minorities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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