J13231 - Psychiatry & Behavioral Neurobiology

Mentor: Dr. Kazutoshi Nakazawa, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.  Email:  nakazawk@uab.edu


The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral research fellow
with expertise in patch-clamp electrophysiology, to join multidisciplinary team studying pathophysiology of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior experience and publications on patch-clamp analysis of ion channels, preferably in cortical or hippocampal inter neurons, are essential. Experience with both voltage-clamp and current-clamp analysis is desirable. Superb opportunity to work collaboratively with cell and molecular biologists, in vivo physiologists, etc.


Candidates with a PhD or MD degree and experience in the above mentioned disciplines should apply with a CV, statement of research interest, and a list of three references to:Kazu Nakazawa, MD, PhD, electronically to e-mail: nakazawk@uab.edu. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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