L13170 - Department of Pathology

Mentor:  Dr. Malay Basu, Assistant Professor, Division of Informatics, Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, WP P220, 619 19th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35249-7331.  Telephone:  (205) 934-5251; Email:  malay@uab.edu

The Computational Genomics Lab at the Division of Informatics in the Department of Pathology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is accepting applications for postdoctoral positions in Computational Biology/Bioinformatics. The candidate will work in various projects in computational genomics, comparative and evolutionary genomics, according to his/her preference. The candidate will play key roles in shaping the scientific environment and computational infrastructure of the division and will be expected to apply for research grants both to the US and agencies abroad. He/she will also help in teaching junior colleagues. Starting dates are open and flexible.

The candidate should have a Ph.D. degree in relevant disciplines with strong background in quantitative sciences. Biological background is not essential. Programming skill in one programming language, such as C/C++, Perl/Python, or Java is must. R/Matlab experiences are desirable. Independent thinking, strong motivation and problem-solving skills are must. Criteria for selection include demonstrated research ability with publications in peer-reviewed journals, proven ability to independently develop research projects and strength in verbal and written communication skills.

Interested candidate should send a brief abstract of research interest, curriculum vitae with publication list, and names and contact addresses of three references to:

Malay Kumar Basu, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Email: malay@uab.edu

The Division of Informatics at UAB was created January 2011 in the Department of Pathology. For more information on the Division of Informatics, please visit our Website .

UAB is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to fostering a diverse, equitable and family-friendly environment in which all faculty and staff can excel and achieve work/life balance irrespective of
ethnicity, gender, faith, gender identity and expression as well as sexual orientation. UAB also encourages
applications from individuals with disabilities and veterans. "A pre-employment background investigation is performed on candidates selected for employment."

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