D221402 - Microbiology

Mentor:  Hubert M. Tse, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Comprehensive Diabetes Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, SHEL 1202, 1825 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294. Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A post-doctoral position is available in the laboratory of Hubert Tse in the Department of Microbiology, Comprehensive Diabetes Center, at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Our research examines the role of oxidative stress on autoimmune responses in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Through the use of novel immunotherapeutics and murine models of T1D, we can determine how reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis contributes to innate immune responses and autoreactive T cell effector mechanisms involved in pancreatic beta-cell destruction (Padgett et al. NY Annals, 2013).

We seek a motivated, creative, and energetic applicant to define the role of ROS synthesis on anti-viral responses to diabetogenic viral triggers (Coxsackievirus) of T1D in both murine models and human translational studies. The laboratory uses immunological methods, molecular biology, cellular biochemistry, redox biology, murine models of T1D, microscopic imaging, and flow cytometry to discover and evaluate new mechanisms of autoimmune dysregulation.

Candidates must have a recent Ph.D. and/or M.D., or equivalent. Priority will be given to qualified candidates with a strong background in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, flow cytometry, and diabetes-related research. Experience with mice is also preferred, but not required. Salary will follow NIH guidelines commensurate with training and experience. Competitive applicants will have a proven track record in terms of publications and independent funding.

If interested, please send a letter describing your research experience/interest/future career aspirations, your CV, and contact information for three references electronically to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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