H110174— Pathology

Contact:

Mentor:  Zdenek Hel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor - Mailing address:  845 19th Street South, BBRB 730, Birmingham, AL 35294-2170; Telephone:  (205) 975-7079; E-mail: zhel@uab.edu


A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr. Zdenek Hel in the Department of Pathology.  The laboratory focuses on various aspects of HIV-1 pathogenesis including dysregulation of antibody and cellular immune responses and testing of novel approaches of HIV-1 prevention using studies in humans and animal models.  In addition, we focus on the design of novel approaches to cancer immunotherapy.  We are looking for highly motivated individuals interested in viral and cancer immunology, HIV-1 pathogenesis, and prevention research.  Experience in immunology and molecular biology is desirable.  The University of Alabama at Birmingham ranks among the Top 16 Biomedical Research Institutions in the nation in funding from the National Institute of Health (NIH).  The Department of Pathology has been ranked among the top ten in research funding from NIH.

To apply:  Send a letter of intent describing research accomplishments and plans, CV, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Zdenek Hel at zhel@uab.edu.

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