K11160— Microbiology

Contact:

Mentor:  John F. Kearney, Ph.D. Professor Mailing address: SHEL 401,  1825 University Blvd,  BIRMINGHAM AL 35294-3300 Telephone: (205) 934-6557 Fax: (205) 934-1875 E-mail:jfk@uab.edu


Postdoctoral positions are available in the Department of Microbiology to work in the laboratory of Dr. John. F. Kearney on three NIH-funded projects. These areas of research are not mutually exclusive and address mechanisms involved in 1) development of the immune system and the role of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase in diversification of T and B cell repertoires 2) the role of spleen Marginal Zone B cells in the immune response to bacteria and other pathogens and 3) the immune response to the spores of the potential bioterrorism agent Bacillus anthracis. The overall research plans of my laboratory are aimed at discovering fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the development and function of the immune system. Further information regarding our laboratory and recent publications can be found at http://www.uab.edu/luckielab

As a Top 20 research university UAB has outstanding research facilities and infrastructure. The Department of Microbiology is the top NIH-funded department of its kind in the USA http://www.microbio.uab.edu/.

Applicants should have a Ph.D., D.V.M., M.D. or equivalent with background in immunology and/or microbiology. Publications record in English journals and expertise in molecular biology and a basic knowledge of flow cytometry, tissue culture and mouse infectious disease models are desirable.

Interested individuals should e-mail their CV, statement of research interests, and the names of three references to: Dr. John F. Kearney, E-mail: jfk@uab.edu

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