Faculty and staff asked to help review student misconduct

Justice statueThe University Conduct Board is responsible for hearing cases and developing appropriate responses for students who are accused of non-academic misconduct — behavior that is inconsistent with the university mission, values and goals outlined in the Student Conduct Code.The Office of Student Advocacy, Rights and Conduct is recruiting faculty and staff to serve on the University Conduct Board for a two-year term to begin in the fall.

The board is responsible for hearing cases and developing appropriate responses for students who are accused of non-academic misconduct — behavior that is inconsistent with the university mission, values and goals outlined in the Student Conduct Code.

“This is an enlightening experience for people to see — the process by which due process is demonstrated for students — in that it considers not only students’ rights but also their responsibilities in the campus community,” said Emily Feinstein, director for Student Advocacy, Rights and Conduct (SARC). 

The board plays an integral role in the adjudication of these cases and helps us provide education and accountability for our student population, Feinstein said.

Catherine Daniélou, Ph.D., senior associate dean for Undergraduate Academic Affair in the College of Arts and Sciences, who has been a member of the Conduct Board for about five years, said participating in these cases “requires analytical and contextual thinking, lucidity, compassion, the ability to stay objective and work collaboratively with staff and student representatives.”

“It can be a challenging task, but it is a rewarding opportunity for faculty to help our UAB community,” Daniélou said. “It is central to our role as educators.”

How does this work?

At least three professionals — faculty or staff — are a part of each hearing along with undergraduate and graduate students.

These proceedings determine whether an individual student or student organization violated any standards within the Student Conduct Code based on a preponderance of information, and the board recommends appropriate sanctions for any student found responsible for a violation.

“This is an enlightening experience for people to see — the process by which due process is demonstrated for students — in that it considers not only students’ rights but also their responsibilities in the campus community.”

In past years, the board included 10 to 15 faculty and staff representatives, but Feinstein would like to raise that closer to 20 or 25 to make it easier to manage a growing caseload she says is a natural consequence of increased reporting, growing enrollment and more students living on campus.

A six-week training program will be provided to prepare board members to serve during the upcoming academic year. Members unable to attend all six scheduled trainings may coordinate other training opportunities with SARC.

Interested faculty or staff willing should indicate email sarc@uab.edu by June 30.