Image Credits


Notice:  Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions

These images may be protected under The Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code), which governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. The images below may not be copied and may not be used without completion of a permission agreement processed through the University’s legal office. All rights reserved. For more information, contact us.



Banner images (left to right):

Dr. Carl A. Grote, courtesy of Dr. Carl Grote, Jr., Huntsville, AL.


Child with pellagra skin eruption on her face, [From] Deaderick, William H. and Loyd O. Thompson. The Endemic Diseases of the Southern States (Philadelphia: Saunders, 1916), Reynolds-Finley Historical Library.


Pellagrin with characteristic lesions on the hands and arms, [Reproduced in] French, Herbert (ed.). An Index of Differential Diagnosis of Main Symptoms (New York: William Wood & Co., 1917), Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. 
This image is also on the Pellagra in Alabama home page.

Dr. Tom D. Spies, courtesy of UAB Archives.


History of Pellagra (top to bottom):

Gaspar Casal’s illustration of pellagra’s cutaneous lesions around the collar, [From] Deaderick, William H. and Loyd O. Thompson. The Endemic Diseases of the Southern States (Philadelphia: Saunders, 1916), Reynolds-Finley Historical Library.

Title page from the second volume of Gaetano Strambio’s De Pellagra, Reynolds-Finley Historical Library.

Robert Thom illustration of Goldberger with his assistant C. H. Waring in one of their 1914 orphanage studies near Jackson, Mississippi (Collection of the University of Michigan Health System, Gift of Pfizer Inc., UMHS. 42.)


Alabama Physicians Debate the “Scourge of the South” (top to bottom):
 
Mount Vernon Hospital for the Colored Insane, near Mobile, Alabama, where Dr. George H. Searcy first recognized epidemic pellagra in the U.S., courtesy of UAB Archives.

Shown here are the dermatologic symptoms characteristic of the disease exhibited in a child.  Photo taken by Dr. H. P. Cole of Mobile, Alabama, published in George N. Niles, 2nd ed., Pellagra: An American Problem (Philadelphia: Saunders, 1916), Reynolds-Finley Historical Library.


Dr. Carl A. Grote’s Forgotten Contribution (top to bottom):

Grote (seated at the desk) and his staff in his office as Walker County Public Health Officer, ca. 1914-1918, courtesy of Dr. Carl Grote, Jr., Huntsville, AL.

Grote examines a young patient in Walker County, 1914-1918, courtesy of Dr. Carl Grote, Jr., Huntsville, AL.

Walker County public health work in a local school, 1914-1918, courtesy of Dr. Carl Grote, Jr., Huntsville, AL.