MT Program Outcomes

MT-ProgramData

BMD Proposed Program of Study

Upon acceptance into the BS in Biomedical Sciences Program, students are provided with a course schedule that they are required to follow throughout the program. Failure to follow the schedule provided will result in the revision of the student's schedule which may make the student ineligible to enroll in specified program courses and/or delay graduation from the program. If a student is unable to follow the course schedule for any reason, please contact Brooke Walker, BMD Program Adviser, 996-4942, as soon as possible for advisement and schedule revision

Proposed Program of Study for a Major in Biomedical Sciences 1,2,3,4

Freshman

First Term

Hours

Second Term

Hours

EH 101

3

EH 102

3

MA 106

3

BY 123
& 123L

4

CH 115
& 115R

3

CH 117
& 117R

3

CH 116

1

CH 118

1

HRP 101

2

Core Curriculum Area IV  4

3

Core Curriculum Area IV  4

3

BMD 150: Introduction to the Biomedical Sciences

1

 

15

 

15

Sophomore

First Term

Hours

Second Term

Hours

CH 235
& 235R

3

CH 237
& 237R

3

CH 236

1

CH 238

1

BY 124
& 124L

4

Core Curriculum Area II or Area IV  4

3

Core Curriculum Area II (Literature)  4

3

NTR 222: Nutrition and Health

3

Core Curriculum Area IV  4

3

BMD 310: Clinical Anatomy and Histology

4

BMD 201: Contemporary Issues in Biomedical Sciences

1

BMD 202: Survey of Biomedical Sciences Literature

1

 

15

 

15

Junior

First Term

Hours

Second Term

Hours

BMD 315: Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology for Health Professions I

4

BMD 317: Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology for Health Professions II

4

BMD 320: Survey of Cell Biology for Health Professions

3

BMD 330: Clinical Microbiology for Health Professions

3

CMST 101

3

Core Curriculum Area II or IV  4

3

AHS 360

3

BMD 380: Research Methods and Scientific Literacy for the Biomedical Sciences

3

BMD Elective 5

3

BMD Elective 5

3

 

16

 

16

Senior

First Term

Hours

Second Term

Hours

BMD 410: Clinical Biochemistry for Health Professions

3

BMD 475: Capstone Experience in the Biomedical Sciences

4

BMD 420: Pathophysiology for Health Professions

4

CDS 420: Competencies in Genetics for Health Professions

2

BMD 430: Clinical Immunology for Health Professions

3

Core Curriculum Area II (Fine Arts)

3

BMD Elective

3

BMD Elective

3

BMD Elective

3

BMD Elective

3

 

16

 

15

Total credit hours: 123

1

Assumes student is placed in MA 106.

2

Assumes student has had one year of high school Chemistry with a grade of C or better.

3

Assumes no Advanced Placement (AP), Dual Enrollment, International Baccalaureate (IB), or College Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit.

4

A 6-semester hour sequence either in literature or in history is required; if a second literature is chosen, it will apply as 3 of the elective hours in Area II Humanities and Fine Arts; if a second history is chosen, it will apply as 3 of the elective hours in Area IV History, Social, and Behavioral Sciences.

5

May choose a Physics sequence as an elective within the BMD program if required as a post-graduate program pre-requisite.

MT Essential Functions

Essential Functions: In order to successfully complete the degree requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology, students must complete the academic and clinical practice requirements. Students must also meet the essential requirements in addition to the academic requirements. “Essential requirements are those physical abilities, mental abilities, skills, attitudes, and behaviors the students must evidence or perform at each stage of their education.”1 The absence of an essential requirement would fundamentally alter the program goals. The essential requirements include categories of observation, movement, communication, intellect, and behavior.

Observation

The student must be able to:

1.       Observe laboratory demonstrations in which biological (i.e., body fluids, culture samples, tissue sections, and cellular samples) specimens are tested for their biochemical, hematological, immunological, microbiological, and histochemical components.

2.       Characterize the color, odor, clarity, and viscosity of biologicals, reagents, or chemical reaction products.

3.       Employ a clinical grade binocular microscope to discriminate among fine structural and color (hue, shading, and intensity) differences of microscopic specimens.

4.       Read and comprehend text, numbers, illustrations, and graphs displayed in print, on a projection screen, and on a video monitor.

Movement

The student must be able to:

1.       Move freely and safely about a laboratory.

2.       Reach laboratory bench tops and shelves, patients lying in hospital beds or patients seated in specimen collection furniture.

3.       Travel to numerous clinical laboratory sites for practical experience.

4.       Perform moderately taxing continuous physical work, often requiring prolonged sitting, in confined spaces, over several hours.

5.       Maneuver phlebotomy and culture acquisition equipment to safely collect valid laboratory specimens from patients.

6.       Control laboratory equipment (i.e. pipettes, inoculating loops, test tubes) and adjust instruments to perform laboratory procedures.

7.       Use an electronic keyboard (i.e. 101-key IBM computer keyboard) to operate laboratory instruments and to calculate, record, evaluate, and transmit laboratory information.

Communication

The student must be able to:

1.       Read and comprehend technical and professional materials (i.e. textbooks, magazine and journal articles, handbooks, and instruction manuals).

2.       Follow verbal and written instructions in order to correctly perform laboratory test procedures.

3.       Clearly instruct patients prior to specimen collection (if applicable).

4.       Effectively, confidentially, and sensitively converse with patients regarding laboratory tests (if applicable).

5.       Communicate with faculty members, fellow students, staff, and other health care professionals verbally and in a recorded format (writing, typing, graphics, or telecommunication).

6.       Prepare papers, prepare laboratory reports, and take examinations within specified times.

 

Intellect

The student must:

1.       Possess these intellectual skills: comprehension, measurement, mathematical calculation, reasoning, integration, analysis, comparison, self-expression, and criticism.

2.       Be able to exercise sufficient judgment to recognize and correct performance deviations.

 

Behavior

The student must:

1.       Be able to manage the use of time and be able to systematize actions in order to complete professional and technical tasks within faculty-defined time limits.

2.       Possess the emotional health necessary to effectively employ intellect and exercise appropriate judgment.

3.       Be able to provide professional and technical services while experiencing the stresses of task-related uncertainty (i.e. ambiguous test ordering, ambivalent test interpretation), emergent demands (i.e. “stat” test orders), and a distracting environment (i.e. high noise levels, crowding, complex visual stimuli).

4.       Be flexible and creative and adapt to professional and technical change.

5.       Recognize potentially hazardous materials, equipment, and situations and proceed safely in order to minimize risk of injury to patients, self, and nearby individuals.

6.       Adapt to working with unpleasant biologicals.

7.       Support and promote the activities of fellow students and of health care professionals. Promotion of peers helps furnish a team approach to learning, task completion, problem solving, and patient care.

8.       Be honest, compassionate, ethical, and responsible. The student must be forthright about errors or uncertainty. The student must be able to critically evaluate her or his own performance, accept constructive criticism, and look for ways to improve (i.e. participate in enriched educational activities). The student must be able to evaluate the performance of fellow students and tactfully offer constructive comments.

1 Essex-Sorlie D. The Americans with Disabilities Act: I. History, summary, and key components. Acad Med 69; 1994: 519-524.

Biotechnology Student Testimonials

"The Master's in Biotechnology Program was the best decision I ever made with my career.  It enabled me to transition into a much more dynamic industry, while giving me the skills necessary to provide value to many different types of businesses in the biotechnology sector."

-   John McCarter, MS
    Director - Business Development
    Soluble Therapeutics, Inc.



I have to admit that my overall experience with UAB’s Biotechnology program can not only be described as rewarding but also as fun! The classroom was not consumed with instructor lectures; class was engaging and encouraged independent thinking through discussion. What sets this program apart is that the students are not just taught theory, we were taught to apply theory to actual problems to develop a solution. This type of learning environment really prepares students for the workforce. Another great aspect of the program was our ability to choose from a vast number of internships, these internships allowed us to apply our refined laboratory and business skills in real world settings. UAB’s Biotechnology program has figured out how to effectively combined science and business in a way that students can successfully enter the science community.  

-          Mary Alice Isom
      Forensic Scientist - Biology
      Alabama Department of Forensic Science



NurseAnesthesiaMove

Nurse Anesthesia has moved to the School of Nursing.  Please click here to go to the Nurse Anesthesia page.

Medical Technologists, also known as Clinical Laboratory Scientists, ranked at No. 55 with Medical Laboratory Technician coming in at No. 71. Clinical Laboratory Scientists analyze blood, tissue and other body fluids using sophisticated state of the art instrumentation and combine that expertise with their specialized knowledge of the pathophysiology of diseases to provide information to all healthcare professionals.

“Laboratory science is a great career for people who want to play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, but do not necessarily want to be involved in direct patient care,” said Michelle Brown, M.S., MLS(ASCP), assistant professor in the Clinical Laboratory Science program. “Our graduates are readily hired after graduation. We often have hospitals asking us when students graduate because they are eager to hire another of our excellent graduates.”

Respiratory Therapists Ranking

Respiratory Therapists, ranked No. 46 in the "Best 100 Jobs in 2012" by CareerCast.com. Respiratory Therapists provide high-tech care in a variety of environments with diverse activities and the choice to work with all ages or specialize for a specific age group. Jonathan Waugh, Ph.D., RRT, professor in the Respiratory Therapy program, said Respiratory Therapists have a variety of work-setting options.

“Most Respiratory Therapists work in the hospital environment which has the benefits of extensive technology and promotes a healthy workplace,” said Waugh. “Critical care settings offer fast-paced excitement while the growing home care practice allows a relaxed setting with a flexible schedule to help people become well.


Physician Assistants ranked No. 26 in the “Best 100 Jobs in 2012” by CareerCast.com.  A national workforce task force predicts there will be a shortage of 100,000 primary care physicians by 2020 giving Physician Assistants the opportunity to fill those needs. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts Physician Assistants jobs will increase by more than 37 percent or 16,900 jobs.

NMT Program Outcomes



Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board – UAB NMT Program Results

First Time Taking the Exam Upon Completion of UAB NMT Program Results:

 

Year

UAB

NMT

Program

National Average for Equivalent Program Graduates

Overall National Average

for all examinees

2011

94.4%

92.5%

91.4%

2010

92.8%

92.4%

88.2%

2009

100%

94.3%

89.9%

The Profession of Genetic Counseling

Genetic counseling is the process of helping people understand and adapt to the medical, psychological and familial implications of genetic contributions to disease. This process integrates the following:

·         Interpretation of family and medical histories to assess the chance of disease occurrence or recurrence.

·         Education about inheritance, testing, management, prevention, resources and research.

·         Counseling to promote informed choices and adaptation to the risk or condition.

 Genetic Counseling Ranked "Best Careers" by U.S. News and World Report

Genetic Counseling has been ranked on the "Best Careers" listing of the U.S. News and World Report for three consecutive years because it is a profession that offers growth potential, high satisfaction, and innovative career opportunities.

U.S. News and World Report: Best Careers:

o   http://www.usnews.com/articles/business/best-careers/2007/12/19/genetic-counselor-executive-summary_print.htm

o   http://www.usnews.com/articles/business/best-careers/2008/12/11/best-careers-2009-genetic-counselor.html

Accreditation Polysomnography

Accreditation:

The UAB School of Health Professions, Polysomnography Certificate Option is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (www.coarc.com).
Commission on Accreditation
for Respiratory Care
CoARC Board Approved 11-13-2010 48
1248 Harwood Road
Bedford, Texas 76021-4244
(817) 283-2835

Credentials Conferred:

A Certificate of Completion is awarded by the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Board Certification:

Students are encouraged to take and pass the Sleep Disorders Specialist (SDS) exam administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) or the Registered Polysomnographic Technologist (RPSGT exam administered by the Board for Polysomnographic Technology (BRPT) after completing their final semester in the program.