Khaled awarded Fulbright NehruKhaled awarded Fulbright NehruMohammad Khaled, Ph.D., has been awarded a Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award to develop and improve research and teaching efforts in India related to Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Khaled, professor emeritus in the UAB Department of Nutrition Sciences, will collaborate with the Department of Physiology at the University of Calcutta, India, to look at Type 2 diabetes mellitus specifically due to Helecobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections which are highly prevalent among Indian populations. This expands research Khaled conducted while a professor at UAB.

“Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease posing great human health threats,” said Khaled. “We see about 50 percent of worldwide populations are infected with H. pylori but more than 85 percent of populations in India have been infected since childhood. So it is of great interest, therefore, to investigate if H. pylori could somehow be linked with T2DM in Indian populations since both of these phenomena are highly prevalent in them.”

Harriett Cloud with family and friends Alabama Healthcare HofFHarriett Cloud with family and friends
Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame
Two healthcare legends with strong ties to the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Health Professions were inducted to the Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame at a ceremony on Saturday, August 25, 2014.

Harriett Holt Cloud, RD, LD, FADA, who has taught in the UAB School of Health Professions since 1976, and Michael E. Stephens, alumnus of the Master of Science in Healthcare Administration Program (Class 9), were joined by 11 others as members of the Hall of Fame’s Class of 2014.

“Harriet and Mike have directly impacted the Alabama healthcare industry for more than 90 years combined so I was surprised when I first learned they were not members of the Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame,” said UAB School of Health Professions Dean Harold P. Jones, Ph.D. “But I also realize that these two have not served healthcare so passionately for so long to receive this recognition – they simply continue to serve others because it is the right thing no matter who notices.”

Cloud, whose health career began in 1946, is the lead author of more than 40 professional articles, book reviews and book entries on pediatric and nutrition needs of children. She also authored the self-study guide for the American Dietetic Association’s continuing education credit on Feeding for the Dietetics Professional.

Story written by Bob Shepard, UAB Media Relations

wendy demark wahnefried nutritionWendy Demark-Wahnefried, Ph.D., R.D., professor in the University of Alabama at BirminghamDepartment of Nutrition Sciences and the associate director for cancer prevention and control in the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, has been named the chair-elect of the Obesity and Cancer Section of the Obesity Society. Her term as chair-elect begins Nov. 6, and she will assume the chair in November of 2015.

The purpose of the Obesity and Cancer Section is to promote research, education and advocacy related to cancer, including: understanding how obesity affects etiology, prevention and management of cancer; the development of effective strategies, interventions and educational efforts that may reduce the impact of obesity on cancer risk and progression; and promote the dissemination of knowledge of the obesity-cancer relationship to the scientific community, clinicians and the public.


elephant sAfrican elephants in captivity are getting fat. While the thought of a pudgy pachyderm might produce a chuckle, it is a situation with potentially serious consequences for the species.

“Obesity affects about 40 percent of African elephants in captivity,” said Daniella Chusyd, M.A., a doctoral student in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Nutrition Sciences.“Much as we see in humans, excess fat in elephants contributes to the development of heart disease, arthritis, a shorter lifespan and infertility.”

Infertility is the aspect that may be most troubling to Chusyd and colleagues. Nearly half of zoo African female elephants exhibit abnormal ovarian cycles, which is strongly correlated with a high body mass index, said Chusyd. According to a 2011 report by scientists at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, zoos in the United States need to average about six births each year to maintain a stable elephant population. But the current average is only around three births a year. Read More...