Jo Wright
Life & Style Reporter

The release of Black Panther over President’s Day weekend spurred plenty of excitement, evidenced by its immense success in the box office. The original estimate of $165 million was eclipsed by the $242 million made domestically. The film, directed by Ryan Coogler, features a nearly all-black cast and qualitative female-empowering roles.   

Many of the action-packed scenes were supported by a plot that gave prominence to Michael B. Jordan’s role as the lead villain, Killmonger, a guise that was new to him as an actor. The narrative follows his attempt to disrupt the peace of the fictional country of Wakanda, ruled by the infamous King T’Challa personalized as Black Panther, played by Chadwick Boseman.  

“Being an advocate for diversity and cultural appreciation, I loved seeing all of that combined into a single movie,” said Ashlyn Murrell, a sophomore in public health and communications. “I loved the social justice elements that were incorporated into the film, especially the overwhelming emphasis on the dichotomy between isolationism and humanitarian aid. However, I am glad that Marvel spent more time and money on an accurate representation of African culture rather than developing plot twists and juicy screenplay. To me, that is much more important than a twist ending.”   

The fictitious vibranium ore powers a bright Wakandan city, which is home to several tribes. Each has its own customs, attire and formalities. These customs, paired with opposing views held by each of the leaders, gives cause for apprehension between the differing groups.  

“No matter how different they were, they would still come together to pick one leader,” said Whitney Zeigler, a sophomore in social work. “They all unified against the one bad source. Sometimes the violence can be combated by the community. In a way, it promotes nonviolence and peaceful organizations instead of anger.”   

The film featured resolute and determined women. In fact, King T’Challa is protected by a group of female warriors led by Okoye, played by Danai Gurira.  

“They weren’t afraid to stand up for what they believed in,” said James Aguirre, a sophomore in finance. “They were with their country and knew when the leader was wrong. They did what was right for their country and the prosperity of their nation. That was impeccable.”   

Letitia Wright plays as Shuri, the younger sister of Black Panther. She portrays an intelligent yet humorous scientist and inventor. Many of her lines were punctuated by the audience’s laughter and beguilement.  

The film featured swooping shots of CGI-created Wakandan landscape. However, these were not the only locations featured. Other dynamic settings included the luminous populated city of Busan, South Korea. Many of the aerial shots featured were taken in Uganda, South Africa and Zambia. 

The film’s main set incorporated plenty of interesting technological advancements, all inspired directly by the original Black Panther comic books.  

“I feel as it should have been a little more visually informative,” said Laith Mekdad, a freshman in mechanical engineering. “I wished it was more realistic when it came to the spaceships and other sci-fi aspects. I would have liked if they stuck to the same theme of realism. The film was like a movement, though. It’s different than how other movies have portrayed the African-American community.”   

 The soundtrack was an anticipated element of the film, indicated by the popular official playlist released in early February. However, there was some disappointment surrounding the method of application.  

“Kendrick Lamar’s entire album was dedicated to Black Panther, so they could have implemented more of the soundtrack than just some of the instrumentals,” said Michaia Gardner, a sophomore in biomedical sciences. “It was inspired by the movie, so they should have included more of the actual lyrics.”   

Aura and Real Life Poets host 2nd annual Spoken Truth Poetry Festival

Join us for a full day of artistry and workshops at the Spoken Truth Poetry Festival on April 14, 2018 from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. at UAB’s Hill Student Center. Admission is free for all attendees. Aura Literary Arts Review (UAB) and Real Life Poets, Inc. have partnered to bring an array of activities to this year’s poetry festival, including a variety of workshops, a poetry slam, and a special poetry showcase highlighting spoken word performers in the region. Workshops begin at 1 p.m. with topics varying from the art of performing poetry, how to become a published author, and how to create your own handmade magazine.

Poetry slam participants must be between the ages of 15 and 21. The poetry slam begins at 5 p.m., followed by the poetry showcase at 6:30 p.m. We believe that art is a vital form of expression that develops independence, enhances creative and critical thinking, and encourages higher order thinking such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Art crosses cultural boundaries and breaks down social, religious and racial barriers. UAB’s Aura Literary Arts Review and Real Life Poets, Inc. aim to encouraging artistic expression, especially amongst the youth and young adults in our community who will someday help activate and bring about change in our world. So be prepared to enjoy a monumental day of truth and expression!

*To register to attend the workshops or participate in the poetry slam, visit www.uab.edu/studentmedia.com. For media inquiries only, contact 205.585.8271 or email info@reallifepoets.org




Spoken Truth Poetry Festival April 14 workshops begin at 1pm and continue until 5pm where the poetry slam and showcase will begin

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USGA to reign in new president: Candidates introduce platforms of their campaign to student body

pres pose 3 1 of 5Siddharth Srikakolapu

pres pose 2 1 of 2Erica Webb

pres pose 1 1 of 4Kevin Pittman



Photos by Laykn Shepard / Photo Editor

Lauren Moore/Campus Editor

As a young and growing institution, UAB looks to student leaders to help shape the future of the university. USGA hosted their 2018 Presidential Debate Thursday, March 1.

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Black Panther Movie Review  

Jo Wright
Life & Style Reporter

The release of Black Panther over President’s Day weekend spurred plenty of excitement, evidenced by its immense success in the box office. The original estimate of $165 million was eclipsed by the $242 million made domestically. The film, directed by Ryan Coogler, features a nearly all-black cast and qualitative female-empowering roles.   

Read more

How to survive to school shooting: Capt. Amy Schreiner shares with students how to live through an on-campus shooting

Sufia Alam
Campus Editor
sufia@uab.edu

According to the Center for Disease Control, roughly half of those who commit or attempt to carry out a homicide at a school usually present some type of warning sign, such as telling others about their plan or leaving a note before the event.   

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