Thomas Gilray

Thomas Gilray Assistant Professor
email
Campbell Hall 129
(205) 934-0653

Office Hours: By appointment

Education:

  • Ph.D., University of Utah, Computer Science
  • M.S., University of Utah, Computer Science
  • B.S., University of Oregon, Computer Science

Thomas Gilray completed his PhD at the University of Utah in 2016 and was Victor Basili Fellow at the University of Maryland, College Park, until 2018. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He has worked on fundamental problems in static-analysis design, applications including component verification and program modeling, and strategies for parallel implementations on GPUs and networked clusters.

Personal Website

He has contributed to the industrial HP Fortify source-code analyzer. He has taught “Organization of Programming Languages”, “Automata and Formal Languages”, and developed an “Intro to Compilers” course where students each build a stackless functional compiler from scratch. He has a strong interest in interdisciplinary research and a history of supporting collaborators in security and high-performance computing.


My research is in tunable, correct-by-design static analysis—mainly of higher-order, functional languages. I also work on parallelizing and incrementalizing such analyses, and on their applications. More broadly, my interests include semantics, language design, compilers and implementations, safety and verification, parallelism and high-performance solvers (e.g., constraint solving on the GPU). Contact me if you have an idea which intersects with my research or broader interests and want to discuss it. I am looking for students!

  • “Soft Contract Verification for Higher-order Stateful Programs.” with Phúc C. Nguyễn, Sam Tobin-Hochstadt, and David Van Horn. SIGPLAN, Principles of Programming Languages (POPL). 2018.
  • “Pushdown Control-Flow Analysis for Free.” with Steven Lyde, Michael Adams, Matthew Might, and David Van Horn. SIGPLAN, Principles of Programming Languages (POPL). 2016.
  • “Allocation Characterizes Polyvariance.” with Michael Adams, Matthew Might. SIGPLAN, International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP). 2016. (Also has an invited journal version published in JFP 2018.)
  • “Dynamic Sparse-Matrix Allocation on GPUs.” with James King, Robert M. Kirby, and Matthew Might. International Supercomputing Conference (ISC). 2016. (Winner of the PRACE ISC award.)

For a complete list of publications, visit Dr. Gilray's website.

  • Student ACM chapter, faculty sponsor