Faculty Associates

Shauntice Allen, MA, Ph.D.

Shauntice Allen, MA, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the UAB School of Public Health. Dr. Allen is also an Associate Scientist with UAB’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science where she collaborates with investigators in the disciplines of medicine, nursing, public health, and business, along with the greater Birmingham community. Her research program has a strong prevention focus at both the individual and community levels where she explores the inextricable link between environmental exposures, race and poverty. Over the last 15 years Dr. Allen has been involved in engaging communities in research, program evaluation, coalition building, and conducting qualitative data collection/analysis.

Recent Publications:

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andrew Baer, Ph.D.

Andrew Baer, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of History with a secondary appointment in African American Studies. His research focuses on race, policing, and social movements in the United States. He received a PhD in History from Northwestern University and previously served as a doctoral fellow at the American Bar Foundation in downtown Chicago. His first book, Beyond the Usual Beating: The Jon Burge Police Torture Scandal and Social Movements for Police Accountability in Chicago, was published in April 2020. He is now working on a second book project focused on race and missing persons.

Recent Publications:

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

D. Scott Batey, Ph.D.

D. Scott Batey, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Social Work at UAB. Dr. Batey frames his work within the HIV Treatment Cascade where he studies individual- and structural-level influences on one’s initial linkage to HIV care after diagnosis, and long-term retention and re-engagement in HIV primary medical care. For example, Dr. Batey’s research experiences include investigation of clinic-based strategies to improve a patient’s adherence to their medical appointments, as well as social work-driven, community-based interventions to locate and re-engage individuals who have fallen out of routine medical care. He often defines his interests as being set at the intersection of the HIV clinic and the broader community. He has recently received a secondary appointment as Scientist through the UAB Center for AIDS Research (CFAR). Dr. Batey values and advocates for the active role of the community in research, also known as community engagement. As such, he works closely with long-time community organization partners to address critical healthcare issues, especially as they relate to HIV. He is a co-founder of the Jefferson County HIV/AIDS Community Coalition, whose mission is to serve as a network of active stakeholders working together towards a unified and healthy community response to HIV/AIDS, and he has served as the Coalition’s Chair for the past two years.

Recent Publications:

  • Batey, D.S., Hogan, V.L., Cantor, R., Hamlin, C.M., Ross-Davis, K., Nevin, C., Zimmerman, C., Thomas, S., Mugavero, M.J., & Willig, J.W. (2012). Short. communication routine HIV testing in the emergency department: Assessment of patient perceptions. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 4, 352-356.
  • Fifolt, M., Batey, D.S., Raper, J.L., Mobley, J.E., & McCormick, L. (2017). The fragile balance of community-based healthcare: One community’s united response when the HIV primary care safety net failed. Journal of Public Health Management & Practice, 5, 507-514.

Robert G. Blanton, III, Ph.D.

Robert G. Blanton, III, Ph.D., is the Chair of the Political Science and Public Administration Department at UAB. Dr. Blanton specializes in the area of international political economy, particularly the “human face” of the global economy. Broadly put, much of his current work deals with the intersection of human rights and the global economic system. That is, he examines how different facets of the global economy — including the investment decisions of multinational corporations, global trade, or the actions of international financial institutions such as the IMF and World Bank — either influence or are influenced by different types of human rights, such as personal integrity rights, labor rights, and women’s rights.

Recent Publications:

  • Blanton, R. G., & Peksen, D. 2019. Labor Laws and Shadow Economies: A Cross‐National Assessment. Social Science Quarterly. https://doi.org/10.1111/ssqu.12685
  • Blanton, R., Blanton, S., & Peksen, D. 2018. The Gendered Consequences of Financial Crises: A Cross-National Analysis. Politics & Gender, 1-30.
  • Robert G. Blanton, Shannon Blanton & Dursun Peksen. 2018. “Confronting Human Trafficking: The Role of State Capacity” Conflict Management and Peace Science

Shannon Blanton, Ph.D.

Shannon Blanton, Ph.D., is the inaugural dean of the UAB Honors College. She specializes in the areas of international relations and foreign policy, with an emphasis on human rights, political violence, and international political economy. Dr. Blanton has published articles on the determinants of U.S. arms transfers, the impact of arms imports on human security in developing countries, human rights as a determinant of U.S. foreign aid, and the role of cognitive images in U.S. foreign policy decision-making. Investigating the significance of human rights concerns in global economic interactions, she has also examined the role that human rights concerns play in shaping foreign direct investment and trade in the global community. Her most recent research examines the impact of international financial institutions, financial crises, and globalization on labor rights and human trafficking in countries around the world.

Recent Publications:

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Faith E. Fletcher, Ph.D., M.A.

Faith E. Fletcher, Ph.D., M.A. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Behavior at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Public Health, and Director of the UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science Community Engagement Domain. Her research program is grounded in methodological and theoretical approaches from the fields of public health, bioethics, and behavioral science, and examines the social and structural barriers to scientific research and health care engagement among underserved populations. Her current work centers African American women living with HIV and other stigmatized populations in the research engagement process to inform ethical research policies and practices. Dr. Fletcher is deeply committed to collaborating with medically underserved communities in the South by embracing them as valued research partners to promote health equity.

Recent Publications:

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jordan Kiper, Ph.D.

Jordan Kiper, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and an affiliate with the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s (UAB) Institute for Human Rights. The central theme in his research is human cooperation and conflict. Having specialized in human rights, his current work explores the relationship between anthropology and politics and law, including propaganda, forgiveness, and the role of religion in conflict and reconciliation. To explore these, he has conducted cross-cultural experiments and undertaken post-conflict ethnography in the Balkans.

Before joining UAB, Dr. Kiper was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) for the Geography of Philosophy Project. He was also affiliated with the Evolution, Cognitive and Culture Lab as well as the Human Rights Institute at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Kiper holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut and an MA in Philosophy from Colorado State University. He is the author of several publications in anthropology, human rights, and religion and has been recognized for teaching excellence.

Recent Publications:

  • Wilson, R. A., & Kiper, J. (2020). Incitement in an Era of Populism: Updating Brandenburg After Charlottesville. University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law and Public Affairs, 5(2), 2.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tondra Loder-Jackson, Ph.D.

Tondra Loder-Jackson, Ph.D., is a professor in the UAB School of Education's Educational Foundations Program, with secondary appointments in the UAB College of Arts & Sciences' African American Studies Program and the Department of History. She is also a founding member and former director of the UAB Center for Urban Education. Her research explores the historiography of African American educators' participation in the long civil rights movement, historical and contemporary perspectives on education in Birmingham, and urban education, specifically related to teacher preparation and school, family, and community relations. She worked previously in nonprofits, schools, and universities in Chicago, IL and Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Loder-Jackson is the author of Schoolhouse Activists: African American Educators and the Long Birmingham Civil Rights Movement (State University of New York Press, December 2015).

Related Publicity and Publications:

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Stacy Moak, Ph.D.

Stacy Moak, Ph.D., is a professor in the Political Science and Public Administration Department at UAB. Dr. Moak has spent much of her academic career researching and writing in the area of criminal justice and criminology. Much of her work focuses on juvenile justice, family, and neighborhood issues. She has published articles concerning disproportionate minority contact with the justice system, legal changes in the juvenile justice system, and system changes in reference to Supreme Court cases. Dr. Moak has also published articles related to food insecurity, mental illness in corrections, and Hispanic perceptions of policing practices. More recently, Dr. Moak has led efforts at UAB to provide experiential learning for students through re-entry simulations which mimic the first 4 weeks of a person’s returns to the community after a period of incarceration.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kathryn D. Morgan, Ph.D.

Kathryn D. Morgan, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Criminal Justice and the director of the African American Studies Program. In addition, she is both the Affirmative Action and Diversity Officer for the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Morgan's research interests include corrections (specifically probation and parole), correctional health care policy, race and crime, and criminal justice policy. A recently developed line of research focuses on the death penalty and its application both nationally and in Alabama.

Dr. Morgan's forthcoming book is Beyond Theory: Probation and Parole in Practice.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Charmane Perry, Ph.D.

Charmane Perry, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the African American Studies Department at UAB. Her research interests currently focus on issues of belonging, identity, and citizenship among second generation Haitians in the Bahamas. In particular, she examines how second-generation Haitians navigate spaces in the Bahamas which are often hostile and exclusionary because of their ethnicity as well as how they construct their identity within these spaces.

Recent Publications:

  • “Invasion from the South: Social Construction of the Haitian ‘Other’ in the Bahamas,” The International Journal of Bahamian Studies 20, Issue No. 1 (2014): 1-12.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.