Mathematics Colloquium

Siegel capture polynomials in parameter spaces

When

April 19, 2019 | 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Where

Campbell Hall 443

Speaker

Dr. Lex Oversteegen (joint with Alexander Blokh, Arnaud Cheritat, Toulouse, Lex Oversteegen, and Vladlen Timorin, Moscow)

Abstract

We consider the set of cubic polynomials $f$ with a marked fixed point. If $f$ has a Siegel disk at the marked fixed point, and if this disk contains an eventual image of a critical point, we call $f$ a \emph{IS-capture polynomial}. We study the location of IS-capture polynomials in the parameter space of all marked cubic polynomials modulo affine conjugacy. In particular, it is shown that any IS-capture is on the boundary of a unique bounded hyperbolic component determined by the rational lamination of the map. We also relate IS-captures to the cubic Principal Hyperbolic Domain and its closure (by definition, the \emph{cubic Principal Hyperbolic Domain} consists of cubic hyperbolic polynomials with Jordan curve Julia sets).


Slices of parameter space of cubic polynomials

When

April 12, 2019 | 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Where

Campbell Hall 443

Speaker

Dr. Alexander Blokh (joint with Lex Oversteegen and Vladlen Timorin, Moscow)

Abstract

In this paper, we study slices of the parameter space of cubic polynomials, up to affine conjugacy, given by a fixed value of the multiplier at a non-repelling fixed point. In particular, we study the location of the \emph{main cubioid} in this parameter space. The \emph{main cubioid} is the set of affine conjugacy classes of complex cubic polynomials that have certain dynamical properties generalizing those of polynomials $z^2+c$ for $c$ in the filled main cardioid.


A class of Schrodinger operators with convergent perturbation series

When

April 5, 2019 | 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Where

Campbell Hall 443

Speaker

Dr. Ilya Kachkovskiy, Michigan State University

Abstract

Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation series is one of the main tools of analyzing eigenvalues and eigenvectors of operators in quantum mechanics. The first part of the talk is expository and should be accessible to students with working knowledge of linear algebra: I will explain a way of representing all terms of the series in terms of graphs with certain structure (similar representations appear in physical literature in various forms). The second part of talk is based on joint work in progress with L. Parnovski and R. Shterenberg. We show that, for a class of lattice Schrodinger operators with unbounded quasiperiodic potentials, one can establish convergence of these series (which is surprising because the eigenvalues are not isolated). The proof is based on the careful analysis of the graphical structure of terms in order to identify cancellations between terms that contain small denominators. The result implies Anderson localization for a class of Maryland-type models on higher-dimensional lattices.


The story of the little ell one norm and its friends

When

March 29, 2019 | 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Where

Campbell Hall 443

Speaker

Dr. Carmeliza Navasca

Abstract

The popularity of sparse ell one norm optimization problem was due to Emmanuel Candes and Terrence Tao via compressed sensing. I will start by introducing the little ell one norm and its minimization. Then, I will describe how and why these sparse optimization problems are useful in solving today’s challenging problems in data science and machine learning. Numerical examples in foreground and background separation in surveillance videos, matrix and tensor completion as well as deep neural network for image classification are included. In this talk, one can observe the interplay of (multi)linear algebra, optimization and numerical analysis with applications in computer science.

This is joint work with Xiaofei Wang (former postdoc at UAB, now Prof at Normal University, China), Ramin Karim Goudarzi, Fatou Sanogo, Ali Fry (former Fast-Track) and Da Yan (CS Prof at UAB).


Probability bounds in classical and quantum statistical mechanics

When

March 22, 2019 | 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Where

Campbell Hall 443

Speaker

Dr. Shannon Star, UAB

Abstract

In the first half we will show that spectral gap bounds lead to concentration of measure bounds. Methods for the former were initiated by Lu and Yau, and further developed for quantum spin systems. This is joint with Michael Froehlich (UAB) a medical researcher pursuing a biostats PhD. In the second half of the talk, we will describe how probability bounds for the classical dimer model and six vertex model in 2d give bounds for quantum systems in 1d: general XY models, the XXZ model and the Hubbard model. This is joint work with Scott Williams (UAB) a former math major. The talk is accessible to students, and is particularly relevant to those interested in Markov chains.


Existence results for some classes of integrodifferential equations of Gurtin-Pipkin type

When

March 1, 2019 | 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Where

Campbell Hall 443

Speaker

Prof. Toka Diagana, The University of Alabama in Huntsville

Abstract

Integro-differential equations of Gurtin-Pipkin type play an important in studying various practical problems. In particular, they have been used to study the heat conduction in materials with memory, the sound propagation in viscoelastic media, or in homogenization problems in perforated media (Darcy’s Law).

To read the full abstract, view the PDF version.