A five-year, $20 million award from the National Science Foundation will help universities across Alabama, including the University of Alabama at Birmingham, collaborate to better understand interactions of a key matter that could translate into the development of new technologies in areas ranging from food safety and aerospace to medicine.
These microcarriers may offer an entirely different approach to treating solid human tumors of numerous pathologic subtypes by delivering their encapsulated drug cargo to a tumor and protecting against collateral tissue damage.
Overall, parents believe their teens are safer than other drivers.
A new mobile virtual reality system helps children learn to cross streets safely.
With funding from the American Psychological Association, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Psychology will host six undergraduate students for paid summer research assistantships. Learn more about the program on the department website.
The Blazer42 Capture the Flag Scholarship Competition provides valuable experience to high school students in an effort to inspire more to pursue careers in cybersecurity.
Nicole Riddle, PhD., received a NSF CAREER Award to fund her research of the Heterochromatin Protein 1 family and create a lab course to introduce transfer students to original research.
A new UAB study found no significant difference in driving performance between young adults with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing peers. It's the first lab-driven research on a topic that's gaining in importance as a new generation of teens with ASD reaches driving age.
This study shows how stress blocks the release of an anti-anxiety neuropeptide in the brain, and it could pave the way for new therapeutic targets for PTSD.
Alabama now has more EPSCoR Track II grants than any other state following the award of basic science grants meant to stimulate competitive research in regions of the country traditionally less able to compete for such research funds.
Michael Heaven's biotech business was hatched in a UAB lab, and accelerated by several UAB resources designed to fuel innovation on campus.
A study led by Department of Social Work Assistant Professor D. Scott Batey is using community-based participatory research to find relationships between community environments and health outcomes for people living with HIV.
UAB researchers will use pressures greater than those found at the center of the Earth to create as yet unknown new materials.
UAB students are inventing new uses for unmanned aerial vehicles—UAVs or drones—employing them to reveal nature’s secrets and even save lives.
Dr. Melissa Harris, an assistant professor in the Department of Biology, has received the 2016 PanAmerican Society for Pigment Cell Research (PASPCR) Medrano Award.
The Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a five-year MIRA R35 grant to Margaret Johnson, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry, and coworkers.
Two UAB professors, Amber Genau, Ph.D., and Nicole Riddle, Ph.D., will receive funding from an elite program honoring young researchers.
Researchers have developed a mechanism that emits sound to thwart eavesdroppers from detecting passwords entered with computer keyboards.
Coating insulin-producing cell-clusters with a thin protective layers may be a way to modify and use pig tissue to ultimately treat human diabetes. Testing in mice is the next step.
The Explorers Club chose UAB’s James McClintock for a fellowship in international exploration for significant scientific contributions. 
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