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TACC features UAB Physics Assistant Professor Cheng-Chien Chen’s research

  • December 15, 2021

The Texas Advanced Computer Center (TACC) has a clear mission: To enable discoveries that advance science and society through the application of advanced computing technologies.

The Texas Advanced Computer Center (TACC) has a clear mission: To enable discoveries that advance science and society through the application of advanced computing technologies. TACC, which is located at the University of Texas at Austin, offers innovative resources to researchers as they work to solve complex problems. Also, TACC highlights valuable research from scientists and scholars across the world that is based on innovative uses of advanced computing techniques.

 

Recently, TACC featured UAB Physics Assistant Professor Dr. Cheng-Chien Chen’s research on quantum materials using advanced high performance computing, in an article entitled, “Thriving in Non-Equilibrium: Computational studies of laser-induced non-equilibrium reveal new states of matter." In the article, TACC notes, “Chen’s theoretical work suggests it is possible to generate superconductivity at higher temperature than previously possible using this method, opening the door to revolutionary new electronics and energy devices.”

The piece also notes Chen’s past research that has been supported by the National Science Foundation and his recent publication in Physical Review X entitled “Fluctuating Nature of Light-Enhanced d-Wave Superconductivity: A Time-Dependent Variational Non-Gaussian Exact Diagonalization Study.”

Chen is leading the Department of Physics efforts on Data-driven Materials Science using Machine Learning and High-Performance Computing. He also teaches a popular UAB course entitled “Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science.”

Recently, Chen received a $300,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to study magnetic topological systems. In an article for UAB News, Chen noted, “The goal of this study is to have the ability to control magnetic and topological properties without the need to apply external magnetic fields, which can open revolutionary opportunities for the U.S. Department of Defense in creating next-generation device technologies.”

Access the full TACC article.