Displaying items by tag: arts and sciences magazine

Senior Bailey Barrow of Pinson has been named a Student of the Year through the American Advertising Federation Birmingham TEN Awards.
Supraja “Sippy” Sridhar, a Hoover native and senior majoring in chemistry, launched a new campus organization to provide a food pantry to students struggling to pay for meals.
October 07, 2016

Social Skills

Here in the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Sociology is focused on providing our undergraduate and graduate students with the skills they need in their careers as well as in graduate and professional schools.
While we pride ourselves on our interdisciplinary programs and partnerships across campus, so much of what makes this College strong are the connections it has with the surrounding community.
April 25, 2016

A Busy Fall Semester

“Dancing at Lughnasa,” the Interlude: Space+Body show in the Department of Art and Art History, Homecoming, Hoops on the Haasephalt, the Scholarship and Awards Luncheon, the Faculty Book Party and the Alumni Awards reception were just some of the incredible events at the College during the Fall semester.
April 25, 2016

History in the Making

Gillian Goodrich studied history. Today, she’s helping to create it. Decades after she began her academic career, Goodrich approaches our common social challenges with the same rigorous examination and long perspective of a historian—one with a giving heart.
April 25, 2016

Budding Knowledge

The College of Arts and Sciences welcomed several new chairs last summer, including leadership for three of our popular and competitive science departments: Dr. Richard Dluhy in Chemistry, Dr. Ilias Perakis in Physics, and Dr. Yuliang Zheng in Computer and Information Sciences.
The innovative UABTeach program educates Alabama’s future teachers.
April 25, 2016

Showcase

The UAB Departments of Theatre, Art and Art History and Music are just a few areas creating learning experiences for students that go far beyond the classroom.  And the community is benefiting as well.
April 25, 2016

2015 Alumni Awards

All five recipients were honored at the annual Alumni Awards reception on Thursday, January 21 at the UAB Alumni House and spoke eloquently of their time as UAB students and the impact that their professors and peers made on their lives and careers.
Internationally renowned primatologist Frans B. M. de Waal, Ph.D., has been named the 2016 Charles W. and Caroline P. Ireland Distinguished Visiting Scholar.
April 25, 2016

A Perfect Match

Lucy Kennedy did not so much find UAB as UAB found her. Her support enables the College to provide scholarships to our most promising students, especially those returning to school while balancing work and families.
April 25, 2016

Partnerships

Our faculty members make investments in their students, and the returns are far-reaching and inspirational.
Professor in the Department of Biology receives the 2016 Charles W. and Caroline P. Ireland Prize for Scholarly Distinction.
April 25, 2016

Opportunities

Capital investments strengthen the College’s ability to attract and retain the best talent and create a state-of-the-art learning environment for our students. Gifts can be made in several ways, including one-time and renewable scholarships starting at $1,000 or invested as an endowment, allowing permanent funding.
April 25, 2016

One for the Books

Twenty-one faculty members published 22 books in 2015 — a remarkable accomplishment.
Doug Barrett, associate professor of graphic design in the Department of Art and Art History, is the recipient of the 2016 UAB President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Alison Chapman, professor and chair of the Department of English, is the recipient of the Odessa Woolfolk Community Service Award.
Dr. John K. Moore Jr., associate professor of Spanish in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, has been awarded a research fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS).
Dr. Jacqueline Nikles, associate professor and coordinator of undergraduate organic chemistry, has appointed a member of the American Chemical Society Examinations Committee, which will write a new standardized ACS Organic Chemistry exam for 2017.
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  • Writing Isn’t What It Used to Be

    Not until I became a college professor did I contemplate the gap between the writing I had been taught and the writing I had practiced in the working world.

    Alison ChapmanIn my seven years as chair of the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of English, I have often reflected, with a certain ironic amusement and—yes—nostalgia, on the kind of writing I did, decades ago, as an English major at a small liberal arts college. We were asked to produce finely crafted, carefully researched essays with a thesis sentence right up front, in which we leaned attentively into the work of interpretation and analysis. I loved writing these polished little essays. I was good at them. And because I was good at them, I later turned out to be good at being a scholar, which is part of what I do as a university professor.

    But that’s not the whole story. After graduation and subsequent employment, I realized that the kind of writing I had been taught wasn’t necessarily the kind of writing my various supervisors wanted from me. I scrambled to figure out how to craft a concise memo, how to understand the audience for a grant proposal, how to construct a survey, how to combine words and images into an effective flyer, how to write a firm newsletter where no one expected—or wanted—to encounter a thesis statement. I figured these things out in part because my undergraduate education had taught me how to stick with a problem and had developed in me the basic building blocks of elegant, effective communication. But still, I had to figure them out.

    It wasn’t until I became a college professor and thereby a writing teacher that I began truly contemplating the gap between the writing I had been taught and the writing that I had practiced in the working world. Digital communications have recently made this gap even wider. In a typical day, I might write text for a new departmental website with an eye to how portions could be repurposed for social media and or an email newsletter—and how those might later form the basis of a new podcast series or be the seedbed for a marketing campaign. The truth is that I love this kind of writing too. It’s shaggier and more sprawling than the serenely contained essays of my college years. It feels more dynamic. My writing has also gotten more creative, in that I’ve realized how much a feel for narrative and imagery can transform any piece of writing: even a memo benefits from a recognizable sense of voice, and the best websites, at heart, tell a story.

    My ideal curriculum would give students a working familiarity with many kinds of writing: literary analysis, fiction, technical writing, and others. Each of these offers different lessons: literary analysis is about preferring open-ended questions to pat answers; fiction is about creativity and nuance; technical writing is about precision and the need for fact. Also in my ideal curriculum, students would become savvy digital users, as comfortable with desktop publishing and video editing software as with the trusty word processor.

    Increasingly, my UAB colleagues and I have been working to transform these ideals into the lived reality of our classrooms. I’m seeing more freshman writing classes that emphasize creativity. More literature classes that require students to draw on an awareness of new media. More linguistics classes that ask students to use sophisticated digital tools. This last example represents one of the most significant changes of the past few years; to adopt a metaphor from the sciences, one might call it a kind of pedagogical red shift. There are simply more digital—and digitally inventive—assignments than ever before.

    Examples of this abound at all levels, but because I’ve been thinking here about my own evolution as a writer, I’ll point to a History of the Book class I’m teaching this semester. This course is a rollicking ride from papyrus scrolls through illuminated manuscripts through Kindle e-books. Recently, I asked students to visit UAB’s medical history library, choose a book from before 1500 (that’s right, before 1500), and then create a digital microsite that chronicles what it’s like to handle pages and bindings that are half a millennium old.

    I smile wryly to myself as I compare this assignment to the ones presented me as an undergraduate. I don’t mean that my History of the Book assignment is better just because it has a sparkling, digital shine. My college essays—which I bet were the traditionally stodgy five paragraphs—taught me a prodigious amount about wrestling complex ideas into disciplined sentences. But there were things those assignments didn’t teach me. I want our students to be presented with writing and critical thinking challenges that I did not face and to emerge with digital and technical proficiencies that took me half a career to develop. If my colleagues and I can do that—and we’re getting better at it every year—I think we’ll have done admirable work.


    Alison Chapman, Ph.D., is the chair of the Department of English.

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  • Bishop in a Bucket: Southerners Bless Solar Energy

    Solar panels are a blessing in the South. Nonetheless, despite this advantage, resistance to change, bottom-lines, politics, and indifference have conspired to impede progress in solar energy.

    Jim McClintockOn a recent Wednesday evening, 50 people gathered in the parking lot of Saint Stephens Episcopal Church in Birmingham. A hint of humidity tinged the early-fall air and those milling about ranged from grade school to retirement age. Church events are as routine as clockwork on Wednesdays in the South: supper is served and there are Bible lessons, prayers and song. Nonetheless, the event that was about to take place at Saint Stephens was anything but ‘routine.’

    On the far side of the parking lot, adjacent the steeply pitched roof of the parish hall rested a bucket truck with its hydraulic boom resting on the pavement. In the bucket stood an operator and Rt. Reverend Glenda Curry, the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama. Dressed in ceremonial garb, the bishop sported a full-length red-velvet cope, and on her head sat a tall bishop’s hat, or miter. As the bucket was hoisted skyward the bishop waved joyfully at the crowd below, then extended her right arm and pointed her index finger toward the large cluster of solar panels that covered the parish roof. Equipped with holy water, olive branch, pastoral staff, and prayer book, Bishop Curry hovered above the solar array. Then, with a nod and a prayer, the bishop in the bucket sprinkled holy water and blessed the solar panels.

    Solar panels are a blessing in the South. This is especially true for Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana, where a high incidence of sunny days makes this geographic region among the best in the nation for the clean generation of electricity from sunshine. Nonetheless, despite this advantage, resistance to change, bottom-lines, politics, and indifference have conspired to impede progress in solar energy. This is surprising given the growing cost-savings of solar energy to consumers (who doesn’t like to save money?), coupled with benefits for the climate and our respiratory health. Think about it, each solar panel installed offsets some of the sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and particulates generated when burning coal and natural gas to make electricity.

    Yet, there are early signs of movement in solar energy in the South. Utility grade solar installations are beginning to appear in states that have been behind the curve such as Alabama. Wells Fargo Bank, Walmart, and Facebook are among a growing number of companies in Alabama that have installed solar fields or solar arrays to reduce costs and contribute to a more sustainable and healthy environment.

    Homeowners in the south have yet to embrace solar rooftops at levels commensurate with regions such as southwestern U.S. Georgia is a bit of an exception, as Georgia utilities owned by Southern Company facilitate affordable marketing of solar to residential homes. In Alabama, however, the major electric utility, also owned by Southern Company, curiously imposes steep financial barriers to discourage residential solar installations. This disparity may change pending the outcome of a lawsuit filed by the Southern Environmental Law Center against utilities imposing high fees on residential solar.

    In the meantime, we can pray that more solar energy projects will be blessed.


    Jim McClintock, Ph.D., is the Endowed University Professor of Polar and Marine Biology in the Department of Biology.

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  • Lila Miranda (“Randa”) Graves – In Remembrance

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences and the English Department are saddened by the passing of Dr. Lila Miranda (“Randa”) Graves, emerita associate professor of English.

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences and the English Department are saddened by the passing of Dr. Lila Miranda (“Randa”) Graves, emerita associate professor of English. Graves received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Auburn University with a focus on 18th-century literature, and she began teaching at UAB in 1975. A respected reviewer, author, and presenter in her area of scholarly expertise, Graves was especially valued for her complete commitment to the UAB community. She was a deeply dedicated teacher, and even after retirement, she continued to teach because she couldn’t bear to be out of the classroom. Graves was also known and admired for her institutional good citizenship, as exemplified by her service as the UAB Faculty Senate secretary and then president. She was a woman of exceptional integrity and, above all, good humor with a smile always ready for everyone. The UAB community is lessened by her absence, and we extend our sincerest support to the Graves family.

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  • Climate change hits home as Alabama experiences more rain, more flooding

    Alabamians are experiencing more intensive, flooding rainfall. Our insurance agents selling flood insurance know it, our meteorologists know it, our road crews and state troopers know it, as do homeowners living along our creeks and rivers.

    ‘And I wonder / Still, I wonder / Who’ll stop the rain?’
    — John Fogerty, Creedence Clearwater Revival, 1970

    Alabamians are experiencing more intensive, flooding rainfall. Our insurance agents selling flood insurance know it, our meteorologists know it, our road crews and state troopers know it, as do homeowners living along our creeks and rivers.

    Alabama residents of communities built on floodplains also know torrential rains have increased, as do the agencies that manage and monitor our sewage treatment plants. The financial costs of the adaptive infrastructure needed to sustain our Alabama communities in the face of these increasing flooding events are significant. We will all have to chip in to keep our heads above water.

    So what is contributing to this increase in the intensity of Alabama’s rainfall over the past few decades? The recipe is simple. Greenhouse gases generated by the combustion of fossil fuels are raising the temperature of our planet. A warmed atmosphere has a greater capacity to hold more water vapor. Moisture-laden air produces downpours that are more intense.

    Southerners are not experiencing more inches of rain each year, but rather, more inches of rain over shorter and shorter time periods, according an analysis of more than a century of rainfall data by climate scientist Daniel Bishop from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and his colleagues, published in 2019 in the peer-reviewed Geophysical Research Letters. They attribute this heavier rainfall to climate-warmed, moister air, combined with greater high-intensity frontal precipitation.

    Therein lies the problem.

    When it rains, it pours.

    Flooding rains are also a growing problem for our natural environment. For example, explosive rains are causing the erosion of the banks of Alabama’s wondrous Cahaba River, one of the most biodiverse, uninterrupted stretches of riverine habitat in America. These bank sediments, along with those from neighboring construction sites, turn the river chocolate brown.

    In addition to the sediments, there are a plethora of fertilizers and pesticides flushed from lawns and farms as well as sewage, sometimes raw, overflowing along the Cahaba River from treatment plants designed to handle rainfall amounts from days gone by. All of these factors challenge the survival of more than 150 species of fish and 30 species of mussels that call our Cahaba River “home.”

    What can we do to protect “Alabama the Beautiful” from increasingly intense rain events? We must invest in the sort of climate-adaptive infrastructure necessary to address our changing climate.

    We can create buffer zones along our rivers and their tributaries to facilitate the absorption of flooding rainwater and pollutants.

    We can invest in bigger and more efficient sewer treatment plants.

    In order to protect our road infrastructure, we can provide funds to enlarge and improve the drainage systems along our highways and the streets of our urban and suburban neighborhoods.

    Moreover, we can avoid building future developments in flood-prone areas.

    At the same time as we address our enhanced infrastructural needs, with the help of our academic and corporate institutions, and our city, state and federal governments, Alabamians can address the underlying root cause of climate warming by reducing our state’s production of greenhouse gases.

    A great place to begin is to take advantage of new cost-effective renewable energies, revolutionary battery technologies — and a rapidly expanding national electric vehicle fleet that will soon include an Alabama icon: the Ford F-150 Lightning pickup truck. Who can resist a pick-up truck with an electric engine that has enough torque to climb just about any Alabama red-dirt, backcountry road?

    Half a century ago, singer/songwriter John Fogerty titled his prophetic song “Who’ll Stop the Rain.” Fogerty’s hit included the equally climate-centric verse: “Clouds of myst’ry pourin … confusion on the ground.”

    We Alabamians cannot stop the rain. We can take action, however, to ensure that flooding rains are not with us for generations. 


    Dr. Jim McClintock is the Endowed University Professor of Polar and Marine Biology in the Department of Biology.

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  • Physicists explain how to beat automation and navigate the Fourth Industrial Revolution

    The first Industrial Revolution, the one that built cities and takes up the most space in history books, was driven by water and steam. The second was fueled by electricity. The third was the result of simple digitization. Today, we are living in the early days of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, powered in part by artificial intelligence (AI), quantum science, and quantum engineering.

    The first Industrial Revolution, the one that built cities and takes up the most space in history books, was driven by water and steam. The second was fueled by electricity. The third was the result of simple digitization. Today, we are living in the early days of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, powered in part by artificial intelligence (AI), quantum science, and quantum engineering. A convergence of physical, digital, human, and biological sciences is forcing companies across all industries to re-examine how they do business and what kinds of employees they hire.

    More and more, repetitive work is being taken on by computers that use AI techniques such as machine learning. What is left for humans? Anything that requires creativity and critical thinking. Research has shown that five skills are of the greatest value to today’s employers. These are what you could call “21st century skills”:

    • problem-solving,
    • critical and creative thinking,
    • collaboration,
    • communication and
    • ethical reasoning and mindset.

    When combined with technical specialized training, these skills make workers more competitive for high-demand, high-paying jobs in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields.

    The Building (IT) Together report from Burning Glass Technologies, commissioned for the city of Birmingham by a consortium of local groups, has identified three main areas for economic growth and workforce development in our region: advanced manufacturing, information technologies, and life sciences and biotech. These recommendations also align with the Alabama Department of Commerce’s Accelerate Alabama 2.0 economic development plan for recruitment, development, and workforce training. As both plans note, employers are seeking candidates who have demonstrated proficiency in using specialized skills to solve complex problems.

    What is the best way to prepare for this future? The 21st century skills are not specific to any individual discipline, but the right blend of training and opportunity is crucial. In the UAB Department of Physics, our existing hands-on research projects and faculty expertise let students pursue highly sought-after experiences in materials science, lasers and photonics, computation, and high-tech instrumentation. These experiences are now critical for all STEMM fields and 21st century jobs.

    Our courses integrate new AI-enabled, socially rich, remotely accessible activities with the best of face-to-face and in-laboratory experiences. In-person or online, our students benefit from one-on-one, high-quality interactions with faculty researchers who have international reputations. You don’t become a physicist by watching a professor talk. You must be a problem-solver, work effectively in teams, have STEMM content knowledge, must be a self-directed learner, and must make ethical decisions.

    The problems addressed by physics research are complex. They require skills such as imagination and the ability to break down a complex problem into manageable parts. You know where you want to go, but you don’t know how to get there. So we train students to tackle situations they have not encountered before through team-based learning and project-based lessons.

    Three examples will give you a flavor of what our students learn:

    • In Machine Learning Applications in Physics and Materials Science, students solve real problems while learning about one of the hottest branches of artificial intelligence and getting hands-on with industry-standard tools.
    • Understanding the World through Data gives students of all disciplines an introduction to computer modeling as a way to develop reasoning, critical thinking, analysis, and problem-solving skills. Throughout the course, students make and explore conjectures in physics and data science as well as biology, the social sciences, business, and more.
    • Reasoning through Modeling and Simulation of Data dives deeper into modeling and simulation, with a focus on using acquired knowledge for project-based cooperative learning in the analysis of real-world datasets.

    UAB has always set itself apart by welcoming undergraduates into our research labs as early as their freshman years. Students who discover an interest in any of these areas can join our research teams working on projects in advanced computation, advanced materials, and lasers and photonics.

    The impact doesn’t stop there. Over the past several years, our faculty have developed an online course called Coding with Physics that uses hands-on, experiential learning and “gameful” learning concepts to help teachers in Alabama high schools get their students excited about science. Our Understanding the World through Data course is a foundational class in the Magic City Data Collective project. This public-private partnership aims to help Birmingham students explore careers and gain data-literacy skills while tackling real-world projects for local companies and organizations. We emphasize the development of digital fluency, i.e., an ability to use technology in order to create new knowledge. For example, when learning a new language, a literate person can read and speak, while a fluent person can use it to create a story or a poem. All students and life-long learners must be able to learn and use the new technologies that they will need to solve problems in the future, including those technologies that do not exist yet.

    No one wants to spend a career looking over their shoulder as a robot is trained to do their work. We are doing our part to prepare a generation that looks forward instead.

    Ilias Perakis, Ph.D., is chair of the Department of Physics. Lauren Rast, Ph.D., is assistant professor in the Department of Physics.

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  • Science and Engineering Complex: A personal perspective

    “My first steps at the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Physics began 28 years ago in July 1993.”

    My first steps at the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Physics began 28 years ago in July 1993. Dr. Bill Sibley, at that time UAB Vice President for Academic Affairs and physics faculty member, invited me to UAB and charged me with establishing a laser lab. Soon after that invitation, I remember sitting at one of the Department of Physics offices with Dr. Chris Lawson and Dr. David Shealy, chair of the department at the time, on the recently opened third ​floor of Campbell Hall, and, together, we generated technical drawings of the future Laser and Nonlinear Optics Labs. We intended to build the labs on the fourth floor during the upcoming remodeling of the then-vacant building shell located on the fourth floor of Campbell Hall.

    After several decades of teaching and researching within the Department of Physics, I am excited for a big day in Fall 2023 when the department, together with the departments of Chemistry and Biology, will be relocated to a modern science and engineering building. The Science and Engineering Complex will provide cutting-edge instructional and research laboratories and will be a magnet for excellent students and faculty. The research missions of these departments and the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) as a whole will be strongly advanced due to a modern and highly collaborative space enabling synergetic relationships between our departments, as well as with other departments, clinical units, colleges, and universities. It is expected that the new complex will enable the three basic science departments to attract new talent, retain existing talent, and win new research funding not possible without this infrastructure investment.

    The UAB and CAS investment in the new Science and Engineering Complex was an instrumental component of a $25 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for Infrared-driven Intense-field Science (IRIS) project recently submitted by 11 universities led by the University of Central Florida. The project became one of the NSF finalists and the final decision is expected soon.

    The UAB Department of Physics’ world-leading expertise and patented technology of novel infrared gain materials and lasers opened the pathway for the design of new highly intense mid-long-wavelength infrared (3-10 um) lasers. Many physical phenomena performed with intense laser pulses—including electron acceleration and the production of short wavelength X-rays—favor lasers with wavelengths longer than the widely available, conventional near-infrared (~1 um) solid-state lasers. Conquering these so-called scaling laws will provide for laboratory tabletop plasma formation and particle acceleration, novel materials modifications, and attosecond (10-18 s) molecular dynamics investigations in university laboratory settings. The long-wavelength regime represents an unexplored scientific frontier that will reveal new phenomena; generate a significant impact across STEM fields; and bring deep insight into atomic, molecular, plasma, and material sciences.

    The UAB Department of Physics and IRIS activities of integrated research, optical development, and education are important steps in reestablishing the United States’ presence in the international landscape of high power laser activities. The commercialization of the infrared laser technology will make them available for new discoveries by many more scientists, including biologists, chemists, materials scientists, and medical doctors.


    Sergey Mirov, Ph.D., is University Professor of Physics. The groundbreaking of the UAB Science and Engineering Complex will be held on Septembter 9, 2021, at 10:00 a.m. Learn more about the new building at uab.edu/cas/building.

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  • Designing science and building excellence

    “As I stroll down memory lane, I can’t think of a better spot to break ground for the new UAB Science and Engineering Complex – a place where research and education will flourish in unison for generations of current and future UAB students to come.”

    It’s a usual, busy morning on University Boulevard as I’m driving to work. Heavy traffic, last-second lane changes, some guy stalls at the green light, people honk. A huge dump truck abruptly pulls in front of me. “This is just great,” I think as the light changes to red and now I’m stuck for another two minutes. I gaze around campus and suddenly my mind takes me on a trip back in time…

    I vividly remember my job interview at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a mild spring day in 2010. I was walking along University Boulevard, trying to keep pace with a few of my future departmental colleagues excitedly showing me the brand new Heritage Hall building and the Rec Center. Looking over the campus skyline, I realize in amazement how much has changed in a decade. It is an incredible feeling to be a part of a dynamic, growing, modern campus.

    Back to the present day… the light turns green and the dump truck turns onto 13th Street South, headed towards the former site of the Education Building. Suddenly, I realize that I’m smiling. “Oh, that’s right,” I think to myself. “The trucks, the construction, we’re building the new Science and Engineering Complex!”

    I spontaneously turn on my indicator and follow the dump truck as it pulls into the now largely flat lot. Staring in awe at the impressive demolition, I can’t help but remember the great times I had bonding with my students in the classrooms of the Education Building, service learning workshops at the Vulcan Materials Academic Success Center (VMASC), and late afternoon Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee meetings at the Center for Teaching and Learning conference room. So much learning, collaboration, and growth happened in this space over the past nearly five decades. As I stroll down memory lane, I can’t think of a better spot to break ground for the new UAB Science and Engineering Complex – a place where research and education will flourish in unison for generations of current and future UAB students to come.

    Spatial intelligence is not my strong suit. It takes me some effort, but, while looking at the construction site, I finally manage to properly orient and picture the majestic L-shaped building I know only from computer renderings and cartoon animations in the real-life space. The shorter wing with windows overlooking the Sterne Library and a gorgeous new courtyard will house the chemistry and physics teaching labs as well as the biology wet lab research facilities. The longer wing along 14th Street South will be the new home to all of the biology instructional laboratories as well as office space for the departments of Biology and Physics.

    I was fortunate to be a part of the planning and design process of the Science and Engineering Complex from its earliest steps, beginning in Fall 2018. I still remember our initial meetings with the architects’ team of Lord Aeck Sargent, the Atlanta-based firm that provided the initial design blueprints and later served as lab and research spaces consultants for this project. Through a combination of their vast experience working with the end-users and truly angelic patience, they skillfully guided us through the design process, asking about our unique needs and priorities and making superb recommendations along the way. Thanks to them—and the equally remarkable team of architects from Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood—we have achieved the perfect balance of modern, functional, efficient, collaborative, and environmentally friendly. It will be a building that will be known as a crown jewel of the UAB research and education enterprise, and it will be a magnet for excellent students and world-class faculty. It will be the place where tomorrow’s STEM leaders will be trained.

    My little detour is over as I’m finally pulling into the parking lot behind Campbell Hall and walking into my laboratory. I know I speak for the departments of Biology, Physics, and Chemistry when I say we’re all beyond excited for the move into the new, cutting-edge instructional and research space. We cannot wait to start teaching our students in world-class instructional laboratories and developing exceptional hands-on undergraduate research experiences for them. With its fluid space, making insular labs a historical artifact, the three basic science departments in the College of Arts and Sciences will be able to substantially expand their research operations, win additional research funding, retain existing talent, and attract the best faculty hires. The unity will weave a social fabric that supports interactions and interdisciplinary projects. My own laboratory will gain access to a modern, state-of-the-art plant growth and culture facility, one that never existed on campus before. The much-awaited move into a new building finally feels real. And while I’m waiting for the big day in Fall 2023, I won’t side-eye those construction trucks anymore. Let’s pardon our progress while we’re building excellence. Go Blazers!


    Karolina M. Mukhtar, Ph.D., is an associate professor, associate chair, and undergraduate program director in the UAB Department of Biology. The groundbreaking of the UAB Science and Engineering Complex will be held on September 9, 2021, at 10:00 a.m. Learn more about the new building at uab.edu/cas/building.

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  • Michele “Mike” Wilson – In Remembrance

    Dr. Michele “Mike” Wilson passed away May 30, 2021. She retired as associate professor of sociology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (2008) and continued working for the university for several years afterwards.

    Dr. Michele “Mike” Wilson in 2007 at the UAB Diversity Awards Dinner. Photo by Patricia Drentea. Dr. Michele “Mike” Wilson passed away May 30, 2021. She was born December 8, 1942, in Puerto Rico to a military family. Her parents were also politically active, which is where she inherited her activist genes. Dr. Wilson earned her doctorate degree in sociology from the University of Connecticut in 1978.

    She retired as associate professor of sociology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (2008) and continued working for the university for several years afterwards. She had a large following of students and won Outstanding Teacher of the Year at UAB. She taught Introduction to Sociology, Social Problems, the Sociology of Gender, and Deviance. Dr. Wilson was a scholar/activist, and she started and directed the Women’s Studies Program at UAB. Dr. Wilson’s research was on abortion. She also studied government leaders and activism in government, the civil rights movement, and abortion rights. In 2006, she received the UAB President’s Diversity Champion Award for her tireless work in equality.

    Dr. Wilson was an active member of the Southern Sociological Society and was known to bring groups of undergraduates to the meetings. She also advocated for female graduate students in the 1980s through the 2000s — a period of time during which she went from being the only female professor in the Department of Sociology, to retiring alongside equal numbers of male and female professors in the department.

    She was committed and steadfast in her activism and courageous in her fight for equality for women. She headed the local chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW) and escorted women to and from Planned Parenthood and across protest lines. Also, she was instrumental in setting up Birmingham's suicide prevention call center. Together with her beloved husband Jack Zylman (deceased 2013), they worked tirelessly for the civil rights movement and in promoting racial equality in Birmingham. She is survived by her brother Rick Wilson and sister-in-law Hope, of Florida, and cousins, nephews, and nieces. She is also survived by stepdaughter Alicia Di Giovanni and grandchildren of San Antonio, TX.

    The Department of Sociology mourns her death. She was brave and ahead of her time. Those who wish to contribute in her name can give to the Dr. Michele Wilson and Professor Becky Trigg Endowed Award, which gives a scholarship to a deserving undergraduate who is academically successful and dedicated to activism and/or gender equity. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests any memorial gifts be made to the endowed award. Gifts can be mailed to UAB Gift Records, AB 1230, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-0112 or made online at go.uab.edu/mikewilson.

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  • Roger T. Lewis - In Remembrance

    Roger Lewis has passed away, but his impact on the development of our Mathematics Department will be felt for many years by both students and faculty. 

    Roger Lewis has passed away, but his impact on the development of our Mathematics Department will be felt for many years by both students and faculty. Before entering graduate school at the University of Tennessee, Roger had worked in industry as a mathematician at the Ballistics Research Labs (Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland) and RCA Service Corporation (Patrick Air Force Base in Florida). Following this, he received his M.S. in mathematics from the Florida Institute of Technology (1964) and Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee (1972). He was briefly at Slippery Rock State College in Pennsylvania before joining UAB in 1975.

    At this time, UAB was only two years beyond the conversion from junior college to university status, and the Department of Mathematics was essentially a junior college department, with faculty involved primarily in teaching remedial and elementary mathematics courses. Further, at this time there were no organized research or grant initiatives in mathematics. 

    Then, in 1978, the department had a new chairman who placed some emphasis on visible research programs which could attract funding. Roger made the most of this opening. He had continued to expand on the work of his doctoral thesis, and in 1980 he received the department’s first NSF research grant. 

    This was followed by a bold plan developed jointly by Roger and Ian Knowles, who Roger had first met at a conference in Scotland in 1974 and who later joined our department. Although on paper UAB did not have facilities to host a large international conference, in 1986 they managed to find space and organize a conference which brought many of the world’s leading researchers in differential equations and mathematical physics to Birmingham (260 mathematicians from 22 countries). This was followed up by conferences in 1990, 92, 94, 97, 99, 2002 and 2005. These were so successful that Barry Simon of CalTech encouraged several of his graduate students to apply for positions at UAB upon receiving their doctorates. And some applicants for positions in the department commented on the impact our meetings had on them and their interest in joining the UAB faculty.

    Roger was chairman of the department in 1984 - 87 and 1997 - 2001 and continued the practice of filling new positions with research talent. This was paying off, and UAB at one point was ranked number three in the Southeast (just behind Duke and Georgia Tech) in NSF grants per faculty. This success was no doubt made possible partly through Roger’s personal manner as chairman.  He was a familiar figure to department members, who knew him as a reasonable person who could be approached with ideas and observations. He was meticulous in honoring agreements, and one had the confidence that he was always trying to do the right thing, which in this setting was to achieve best results for faculty and students. He brought a high level of integrity to his position as chairman, and inspired confidence in those who worked with him on various projects to improve department teaching and research.

    In addition to individual grants faculty were winning for their research, the university was awarded an EPSCoR grant (1986 - 91). These grants were for Established Programs to Stimulate Competitive Research and were large interdisciplinary university grants designed to enable promising departments to develop their research potential. Over the next few years, the Mathematics Department (along with Physics and other areas) enjoyed substantial EPSCoR funding to develop research activities they had been building over the past few years. Roger was a lead investigator on our first EPSCoR proposal.

    In addition to these successful efforts to develop research areas, productivity and funding, the department took the significant step of beginning a doctoral program. Previously within the Alabama system there had been a doctoral mathematics program only at the Tuscaloosa campus. But Roger engaged UAB administration and interested department members to lead UAB’s objective of raising its graduate program to the highest level. After skillfully weaving through sensitive and highly political issues, a joint program involving the Birmingham, Tuscaloosa and Huntsville campuses emerged and received state approval. Our doctoral program is now a high point of our department and has generated additional initiatives to raise the level of hiring research faculty and developing the research capabilities of our students. And in his leadership role, Roger continued his productivity past retirement, producing a total of 51 books and papers.

    Finally, it is a sign of the current status of the department that UAB was selected to host an NSF Fast Track program, in which undergraduate students showing talent for mathematics are given the opportunity to accelerate their programs to reach the graduate level more quickly. In this way the tremendous success of the research and graduate activities of the department have helped develop new opportunities for undergraduate students as well.

    Through these efforts, Roger has been a significant figure in achieving the present success of the department, and in pointing a way to build an even more exciting future for our students and faculty.


    Funeral services will be held on Monday, June 14, 2021, at 12:00 p.m. at Independent Presbyterian Church, 3100 Highland Avenue, Birmingham, AL 35205.

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  • Rosianna Gray aims to reach students early in life

    If you ask Rosianna Gray, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, to describe her experience at UAB over the past four years, she lights up quickly.

    Rosianna Gray, Ph.D.If you ask Rosianna Gray, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, to describe her experience at UAB over the past four years, she lights up quickly.

    “Beyond my expectations,” said Gray.

    In a way, the word “expectations” defines so much about Gray and her approach to teaching, research, and community engagement. On the first day of every class she teaches at UAB, she displays a slide to all of her students that says, “Every Student Reading This Slide Is Smart.” According to Gray, it’s a message that some students might be hearing for the first time.

    “That statement is not up for debate,” said Gray. “Now, learning behavior is debatable, though.” 

    Gray’s vision for her students is informed by years of research on metacognition. “It’s teaching the idea of the process of thinking about any concept,” said Gray. For Gray, metacognition is something students can embed into their everyday behavior. 

    And she’s not limiting her metacognition strategies and pedagogy to college students, either. Gray visits high schools across the state to promote STEM disciplines, do science with students, and discuss the transition to college – especially for first-generation college students. She emphasizes exposure and encourages students to adopt a more inclusive and diverse view of scientists. 

    “I want to be more visible,” said Gray.

    Although much of her focus has been engaging high school juniors and seniors, she is now visiting elementary schools and connecting with younger students. “I started asking myself, ‘How can I reach students before they reach me?” said Gray. 

    While participating in a career day at an elementary school, Gray felt a slight tug on her lab coat. She looked down and saw a young girl.

    “The student asked, ‘You’re a scientist?’” said Gray. “I told her, ‘Yes.’ The little girl continued to look at me and she said, ‘But you’re a girl. And you’re black.’ I went to my car and cried for 30 minutes,” said Gray.

    Powerful moments like this inspired Gray to reflect on her experiences and the various barriers she faced throughout her academic journey, which is why she is so passionate about connecting with students from elementary, middle, and high schools and standing alongside them as they navigate similar challenges. Along with her research and teaching, Gray has also co-founded a nonprofit organization called Our Firm Foundation, which provides courses on social emotional learning (SEL), STEM, and career mentoring to families in Birmingham City Schools.

    KaRita Sullen, an educational technology instructor at Oxmoor Valley Elementary School, has hosted Gray in her classroom and seen the impact of her work first-hand. “Dr. Gray was always the first to commit to presenting fun, hands-on, educational activities for our students during our STEAM celebrations,” said Sullen. “She was eager to come out and always made sure she had enough supplies and materials for every student. Both years, her activities were a hit!”

    Moving forward, Gray will continue to engage with schools across Alabama, and, in the near future, she aims to publish an article on the impact and outcomes of her metacognition strategies. “My pedagogy has an interesting name,” said Gray. “It’s called ‘Grandma’s Recipe for Accountable Learning and Time Management.’”

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  • 2021 winners of the College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Awards for Excellence in Teaching

    The Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching recognizes full-time regular faculty members of University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments in teaching. Award winners must have held faculty status at UAB for a minimum of three years and may receive the award only once in any three-year period.

    The Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching recognizes full-time regular faculty members of University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments in teaching. Award winners must have held faculty status at UAB for a minimum of three years and may receive the award only once in any three-year period.

    The CAS President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching Committee selected the 2021 award recipients from each of the following disciplines:

    • Arts and Humanities: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, and Philosophy
    • Natural Sciences and Mathematics: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, and Mathematics
    • Social and Behavioral Sciences: African American Studies, Anthropology, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Political Science and Public Administration, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology

    The 2021 Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching winners include:

    [widgetkit id="78" name="2021 Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching winners"]

    Also, in the near future, one of these winners will be awarded the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

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  • Department of English announces 2021 Faculty Awards

    Two Department of English faculty members are being recognized for their commitment to excellence in teaching and composition this year.

    By: Dena Pruett

    Two Department of English faculty members are being recognized for their commitment to excellence in teaching and composition this year.

    Core Teaching Award

    Assistant Professor Joseph Wood is this year’s winner of the Core Teaching Award. This award was established by a community advisory committee years ago as a way to honor excellent classroom instruction in 100- and 200-level courses. Wood has taught a wide variety of courses and is especially gifted at creating a dynamic discussion environment.

    Wood is the author of four books and five chapbooks of poetry, which include YOU. (Etruscan, 2015) and Broken Cage (Brooklyn Arts, 2014; finalist for 2013 National Poetry Series). His work has appeared widely, in journals such as Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, North American Review, and Verse Daily, among others. At UAB, he teaches world literature, creative writing, and composition.

    The Walt Mayfield Adjunct Teaching Award

    This year’s winner of the The Walt Mayfield Adjunct Teaching Award is Sally Anne Perz. Much like the namesake of the award, Perz is a positive and encouraging teacher. She currently teaches EH 102 and tutors in the University Writing Center.

    Perz recently graduated from UAB with a M.A. in English with a concentration in Rhetoric and Composition. She hopes to continue her project on the rhetoric of oppression and exclusion. Though she has a lifelong passion for literature, she specifically chose rhetoric to focus her studies on anti-racist pedagogy and designing anti-racist curricula.

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  • Honoring the Founding Director of UAB Gospel Choir

    The College of Arts and Sciences and UAB community are heartbroken that our beloved Department of Music Professor and the Founding Director of the UAB Gospel Choir Kevin P. Turner died on Monday, March 1, 2021, after an extended illness.

    The College of Arts and Sciences and UAB community are heartbroken that our beloved Department of Music Professor and the Founding Director of the UAB Gospel Choir Kevin P. Turner died on Monday, March 1, 2021, after an extended illness.

    During his extraordinary life and career, Turner was an accomplished songwriter, organist, pianist, gospel singer, choir director, minister of music and educator. He directed the UAB Gospel Choir for more than 22 years and established it as one of the first in the country to be offered and sanctioned by college music departments within the music program for college credit. Turner also taught courses for UAB’s African American Studies Program and served as senior pastor at Holy Harvest Ministries.

    Turner was also a suffragan bishop in the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World denomination, and graduated summa cum laude from Andersonville Theological Seminary. For his outstanding contributions to church music and worship, he was awarded an honoris causa Doctorate in Divinity degree from St. Thomas Christian University. He worked for the American Red Cross for seven years, was a loaned executive for United Way of Central Alabama annual fundraising campaigns, participated in the music ministries at the historic 16th Street Baptist Church, the Alabama District Council of Pentecostal Assemblies of the World, Sixth Avenue Baptist Church and Faith Apostolic Church. 

    “Kevin's life and his work was sharing his love of music and his love of God with young people, and with all who had ears to hear, and we are grateful for the legacy he built in the UAB Department of Music and the wider university,” said Department of Music Chair Patrick Evans, D.M.

    During his time with UAB’s Department of Music, Turner reached thousands of students and brought significant attention and acclaim to the UAB Gospel Choir. Through Turner’s passionate efforts, the UAB Gospel Choir performed countless concerts and produced and recorded albums that were featured both on the radio and in music stores. As a result, the UAB Gospel Choir reached audiences across the globe.

    Turner helped develop a powerhouse strategy of turning out above-average student talent and presenting sold-out concerts. Under Turner’s direction the UAB Gospel Choir performed live from campus to 5 million viewers on NBC’s The Today Show; created songs that reached No. 1 on amazon.com and XM Satellite radio; and proudly represented UAB locally, nationally and with self-funded international tours. During UAB's 40th anniversary, the UAB Gospel Choir was included as one of 40 UAB breakthroughs. Turner retired in 2017.

    “UAB, the City of Birmingham, the State of Alabama, this country and the world will forever be blessed by the legacy left by Kevin P. Turner,” said University Professor of Music Henry Panion III, Ph.D.

    Our hearts are with Turner’s family and loved ones.

    The UAB Department of Music encourages people to celebrate Turner’s life and work by listening to a collection of recordings titled “Legacy.” The recordings can be found here.

    Also, WVTM 13 produced a wonderful tribute video about Turner. The piece features performances from Turner and the UAB Gospel Choir, as well as a heartfelt reflection from a former student and choir member Steven Wilson.

    In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests any memorial gifts be made to the Kevin Turner Gospel Choir Scholarship at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Gifts can be mailed to UAB Gift Records, AB 1230, 1720 2nd Avenue South Birmingham, AL 35294-0112, call 205-934-7242 or online at go.uab.edu/KevinTurnerGospelChoir.

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  • Kharlampieva’s lab makes microsponges to clean wastewater using just ultraviolet light and oxygen

    Eugenia Kharlampieva’s lab at the University of Alabama at Birmingham has developed microsponges to clean wastewater using just ultraviolet light and oxygen. Read more about it in Chemical and Engineering News.

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  • French professor wins national award for mentorship

    Charly Verstraet, Ph.D., an assistant professor of French, was recently awarded “Best University Professor” by the American Journal of French Studies for his mentorship and dedication to his students.

    Charly Verstraet, Ph.D., an assistant professor of French in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, was recently awarded “Best University Professor” by the American Journal of French Studies for his mentorship and dedication to his students.

    Verstraet, originally from the French region of Flanders, knows how daunting publishing in a foreign language can be. He was excited to offer his students an opportunity to publish their work and gain practical experience writing in French when he heard about the American Journal of French Studies essay contest. 

    “Every professor hopes their students will be successful, no matter what they do,” said Verstraet. “One of the biggest rewards is when you receive an email from a student telling you what they have done or become. That warms your heart.”

    Verstraet encouraged five students to submit essays to the journal for publication. Recent alumna Abby Garver received third place for her personal essay. She wrote about her experience with bipolar disorder and how French became her “asylum from the madness.” Garver later became the journal’s Director of Operations after graduating from UAB. 

    “For me, the biggest moment of happiness isn’t me receiving an award but seeing my students succeed,” said Verstraet. “I was much happier for Abby to receive an award than me. She’s at the beginning of her career.”

    The American Journal of French Studies is based in Louisiana and began in 2019. Verstraet encouraged his students to submit work to the journal due to the region’s similarity to South Alabama. Verstraet is interested in the similarities shared by communities and cultures between the South of the U.S. and the Caribbean.

    “There are many, many different Souths just like there are many different Caribbeans. And that’s a question of representation and visibility, of different histories, of different cultures, different waves of immigration. All of these factors play into that,” said Verstraet. “It is important to advocate for all of them, not just one.”

    Currently, Verstraet is teaching a course called, “The French Revolution and its Caribbean Aftershocks.” He is also translating Crusoe’s Footprint by Martinican writer Patrick Chamoiseau in association with the University of Virginia Press. Verstraet uses his experience publishing in a second language to advise his students.

    “I had a student who told me in French this semester, ‘I’m so scared to speak French, I’m still a nestling, I’m still a little bird.’ The fear of flying is part of the process of flying. You have to be scared and jump into the void to learn how to fly,” said Verstraet. “It’s very similar for languages or learning other cultures. It's scary and there’s fear in the process but once you overcome that fear there’s a whole world that’s waiting for you.”

    Learn more about the French concentration in the UAB Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.

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  • Advanced Materials Characterization research core selected by IRCP

    The UAB Office of Research and the Institutional Research Core Program announced the selection of a total 15 cores that align and contribute to UAB’s research mission and provide access to cutting-edge technology and/or specialized expertise.

    The UAB Office of Research and the Institutional Research Core Program announced the selection of a total 15 cores that align and contribute to UAB’s research mission and provide access to cutting-edge technology and/or specialized expertise. For the first time, a research core led by the College of Arts and Sciences in Advanced Materials Characterization has been selected for funding. Dr. Paul Baker, researcher in the Department of Physics, is the director with co-director Dr. Vinoy Thomas from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. This new institutional core will consolidate materials characterization facilities in the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering under one organizational structure and will result in improved maintenance of high-end capital equipment and result in new interdisciplinary collaborations on UAB campus.

    Selections were made based on merit from 24 applicant cores. Criteria included alignment and contribution to UAB’s research mission, access to cutting-edge technology and/or specialized expertise represented in the services of the core, and core leadership. Learn more about the 15 cores.

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  • History Professor Publishes New Book

     
    Andrew S. Baer, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of History, has published a new book entitled, “Beyond the Usual Beating: The Jon Burge Police Torture Scandal and Social Movements for Police Accountability in Chicago.”
     

    Andrew S. Baer, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of History, has published a new book entitled, “Beyond the Usual Beating: The Jon Burge Police Torture Scandal and Social Movements for Police Accountability in Chicago,” (University of Chicago Press).

    Baer studied the Civil Rights Movement early in his career, but over time he began to focus on cities in the northern United States, including Chicago.

    “My research interests lie on the intersection of race, policing, and social movements,” Baer says. “While this book focuses on Chicago from the 1970s to the present, these issues are timeless, and I hope my arguments are transportable to other contexts. I decided to study police torture in Chicago and social movements for police accountability because I wanted to join scholars who have pushed research on the Civil Rights Movement into new directions, namely by focusing on the period after 1970, on issues other than voting rights and desegregation, and locations beyond the South.”

    Baer says the book is applicable beyond a specific city or time frame. “The Chicago police torture cases remain relevant for both abstract and concrete reasons. On an abstract level, many of the general themes of my work—racial disparities in law enforcement, police violence, and grassroots resistance—remain prevalent in cities across America today. Activists and policymakers might draw lessons from this history to improve policing and ensure accountability in the present day. On a more concrete level, the survivors of police torture in Chicago continue to suffer the effects of their abuse.”

    Baer is now working on his second book, “Black and Missing,” which explores the intersection of race, law enforcement, and missing persons.

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  • Honoring the 2020 winners of Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching

    Congratulations to Drs. Danny Siegel (English), Renato Camata (Physics), and Jason Linville (Criminal Justice)
    From left: Dr. Renato Camata, Dr. Danny Siegel, and Dr. Jason Linville.

    The Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching recognizes full-time regular faculty members of College of Arts and Sciences who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments in teaching. The individual must have held faculty status at UAB for a minimum of three years and may receive the award only once in any three-year period. The 2020 winners were chosen from these three distinctive areas and departments:

    • Arts and Humanities: Art and Art History, Music, Theatre, English, Foreign Languages, History, and Philosophy
    • Natural Sciences and Mathematics: Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, and Mathematics
    • Social and Behavioral Sciences: African American Studies, Anthropology, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Political Science and Public Administration, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology

    The awards were based outstanding accomplishments in teaching as demonstrated by criteria including:

    • Broad, thorough knowledge of the subject area and the ability to effectively convey difficult concepts to students.
    • Exemplary classroom instruction as evidenced by student and peer evaluation.
    • Fairness, open-mindedness, and accessibility to students in and out of the classroom setting.
    • Effective use of innovative teaching methods and assurance that his/her courses stay abreast of current theory and use of modern technology.
    • Ability to infuse students with a commitment to life-long learning and professional development.

    The three winners, who were selected by the CAS President's Award for Excellence in Teaching Committee, will be considered for the final College of Arts and Sciences nominee for the President's Award of Excellence in Teaching. 

    Arts and Humanities: Dr. Danny Siegel, Associate Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of English

    Natural Sciences and Mathematics: Dr. Renato Camata, Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director, Department of Physics

    Social and Behavioral Sciences: Dr. Jason Linville, Teaching Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice

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  • Why I Give: Robert Collins, Ph.D.

    Many of our donors give to the College as a way of showing their appreciation for the people who inspired and guided them to academic and professional success. We asked a few of our supporters to share their stories of why they give and how investing in the College will ensure the success of our future students.

    Many of our donors give to the College as a way of showing their appreciation for the people who inspired and guided them to academic and professional success. We asked a few of our supporters—including Emeritus Associate Professor Robert Collins, Ph.D.—to share their stories of why they give and how investing in the College will ensure the success of our future students.

     

    Arts & Sciences magazine: What do you do for a living?

    Robert Collins: I have been retired from the Department of English for almost a decade. Before I retired, I taught American literature and writing, including creative writing, for thirty years in the English Department at UAB. While serving as an English professor, I co-founded Birmingham Poetry Review with Randy Blythe, Ph.D., and directed the creative writing program for almost ten years. Since retiring, I have published two volumes of poetry, Naming the Dead (FutureCycle Press, 2012) and Drinking with the Second Shift (Word Tech, 2017). I am currently working on another collection of poems.

    A&S: Did you benefit from scholarships when you were a student?

    RC: Yes, I did. I attended Xavier University in Cincinnati on a presidential scholarship.

    A&S: What made you decide to make a gift to the College of Arts and Sciences?

    RC: I had several reasons for making a gift (the Collins Family Scholarship in Creative Writing) to the College of Arts and Sciences at UAB. First, I wanted to honor a worthy student with the gift of time, so precious to any writer, and to raise the status of creative writing, which is as demanding a discipline as any other in the arts and sciences. Second, I wanted to express my gratitude for the position I held in the English Department at UAB, which gave me the opportunity “to pursue my talents in the direction of excellence” as John F. Kennedy, one of my heroes, observed when asked why he wanted to be president. Third, and most importantly, I wanted to honor and express my gratitude to my parents John and Veronica Collins for the way in which they stressed the importance of education, especially higher education, which they rightly believed to be the key to a better life.

    A&S: Where do you see the College of Arts and Sciences in the next ten years? Fifty years?

    RC: So many physical changes have taken place on campus in the ten years since I retired that I hesitate to say anything about what might happen in the next ten, let alone fifty. I can speak, however, to what I would like to see happen in the next decade. Primarily, I'd like to see UAB redirect its resources to assure that faculty are secure, prosperous, and not overworked. Since enrollment at UAB has increased so dramatically in the past decade, I’d like to see the university focus on hiring many more faculty members in tenure-track positions and compensating them commensurate with the heavy load they carry. The colleagues I worked with during my 30 years at UAB were the smartest and hardest working people I knew.


    Donor support is invaluable in ensuring that our students receive the quality education that, regardless of their course of study, will set them on the path to success. For additional information regarding gifts to the College of Arts and Sciences, please contact Camille Epps at camilleepps@uab.edu or call (205) 996-2154.

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  • Political Science and Public Administration faculty win national awards

    Three faculty members in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration received organization-wide awards from the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration.

    Three faculty members in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Dr. Nevbahar Ertas, Dr. Akhlaque Haque and Dr. Wendy Gunther-Canada, received organization-wide awards from NASPAA (Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration). NASPAA is the accreditation agency for schools of public policy and public administration, and is the primary organization for pedagogy and administration in those fields.

    Ertas won the NASPAA Award for Outstanding Service, specifically for her role as Chapter Advisor of Pi Alpha Alpha, the honors organization in the area of professional public administration.

    Haque and Gunther-Canada will be honored for co-authoring the 2019 Article of the Year in the Journal of Public Affairs Education (JPAE). JPAE is the flagship journal of NASPAA and is and is widely considered a top journal of pedagogy and program administration within the field. Their article, "Public Service For All: How a Global Ethic Prepares Public Administrators for a Transnational Century," was lauded for its “span of coverage, methods, and impact to the field.” The awards committee further cited the articles’ role in helping to “increase evidence-based instruction and administration of public affairs programs.”

    They will accept their awards at the national meeting of NASPAA, which will be held in October in Los Angeles.

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