""Note: Some course names on BlazerNET will show Topics in Philosophy or Philosophy Seminar. CRN = Course Reference Number.





Summer 2019 Courses

100-Level Courses

PHL 100: Intro to Philosophy
 

Introductory survey of philosophy, its nature, methods, and problems. Topics typically include, among others, existence of God, freedom, knowledge, right and wrong. Classical and/or contemporary readings. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 115: Contemporary Moral Issues

Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 116: Bioethics

Moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • MTWRF 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. May session, Andrew Morgan (CRN 45849)
  • ONLINE 7-week A session, Matthew King (CRN 44279)

200-Level Courses

PHL 203: Philosophy of Religion

Religion; its nature, justification, and significance. God, evil, religious experience, faith, and reason. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 290: Special Topics Philosophy of Art

This is a course in aesthetics as it relates to art. We will explore the concept of art itself. How does art differ from craft and mechanical reproduction? How does it achieve greatness? What criteria can we use to judge a work of art and how do we cultivate aesthetic appreciation? What makes art valuable? What do specific works and styles of art say about the people and cultures which produced them?

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • TR 10:20 – 12:20 p.m. 10-week session, Mary Whall (CRN 45851/45852)

300-Level Courses

PHL 490: Special Topics Philosophy of Art (Capstone)

This is a course in aesthetics as it relates to art. We will explore the concept of art itself. How does art differ from craft and mechanical reproduction? How does it achieve greatness? What criteria can we use to judge a work of art and how do we cultivate aesthetic appreciation? What makes art valuable? What do specific works and styles of art say about the people and cultures which produced them?

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • TR 10:20 – 12:20 p.m. 10-week session, Mary Whall (CRN 45851/45852)
PHL 499 Directed Studies

On-campus and off-campus training positions in fields utilizing critical language and writing skills. Students should contact Dr. Welch to discuss available positions and application procedures. Student must be a Philosophy major or minor.

Time Offered/Instructor:

Fall 2019 Courses

100-Level Courses

PHL 100: Intro to Philosophy

Introductory survey of philosophy, its nature, methods, and problems. Topics typically include, among others, existence of God, freedom, knowledge, right and wrong. Classical and/or contemporary readings. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 115: Contemporary Moral Issues

Survey of contemporary moral problems and dilemmas; introduction to methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, homosexuality, animal rights, and respect for nature. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 116: Bioethics

Moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 120: Practical Reasoning

Survey of skills in critical thinking and scientific reasoning, including the ability to identify different kinds of arguments, recognize common fallacies of reasoning, and evaluate analogical, causal, and statistical arguments. Quantitative Literacy is a significant component of this course. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 125: Intro to Ethics, Honors

Open to students in UAB’s Honors College, this course will be a special introduction to ethics. Students will be broken up into debate teams, modeled on the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl competition (which UAB’s team competes in every year, coached by Dr. May). There will be some lectures on moral philosophy and on how to effectively analyze and debate contemporary moral problems. But much of the course will be structured around working in teams to analyze these complex ethical issues facing society today. The ethical issues arise in political affairs, professional contexts (e.g. medical, business, journalism, law), and interpersonal relationships. Students will research the facts of several real-life cases, compose in writing and present orally arguments on how the cases should be resolved, and respond to questions raised by an opposing team or judges. So students must be willing and able to engage in public speaking (in class). No prerequisites. This course counts toward Core Area II (Humanities & Fine Arts). Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course (QEP).

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • MWF 1:25 – 2:15 p.m., Josh May (CRN 62402)

200-Level Courses

PHL 203: Philosophy of Religion

Religion; its nature, justification, and significance. God, evil, religious experience, faith, and reason. This course meets the Core Curriculum requirements for Area II: Humanities.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 216: Intermediate Bioethics

In-depth study of moral problems and dilemmas in medicine and health professions; elementary methods and concepts of moral philosophy. Problems typically include, among others, AIDS and human and animal experimentation. Ethics and Civic Responsibility are significant components of this course.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 240: Ancient Greek Philosophy

Origins and development of Western philosophic tradition, with emphasis on writings of Plato and Aristotle. Concepts of knowledge, reality, and the good life.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 270: Science, Knowledge and Reality

Science; its nature, scope, and significance. Scientific reasoning; science as social institution; ethical issues in science.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 291: PHL and Superheroes

Greetings, True Believers! While philosophy is largely ignored in pop culture, superheroes are positively ubiquitous. In this course, we'll seek a better understanding of the world we inhabit by examining a range of philosophical topics through the lens of superheroes and the worlds they inhabit.

Topics include: whether with great power comes great responsibility; questions of personal identity through Wolverine and the Hulk; the philosophy of "reading minds" with Prof. X and the White Queen; perception and Daredevil; as well as a host of ethical questions regarding vigilante justice and absolute moral rules (e.g., Batman) and the limits of morality's demands with Superman.

The course assumes no prior knowledge of philosophy and no further familiarity with superheroes apart from our pretty quotidian exposure to them. All topics and characters are introduced as part of the course material.

Time Offered/Instructor:

300-Level Courses

PHL 309: Teaching Practicum

Teaching experience in philosophy courses, supervised by a faculty member. Student must have previously taken the course for which the student will work within. Permission of Director of Department Chair required. Pass/Fail.

Time Offered/Instructor:

 
PHL 315: Ethics: Theories of Good and Evil

Morality; its nature, principles, and scope. Normative and critical problems in moral philosophy; moral obligation. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • MWF 9:05 – 9:55 a.m., Josh May (CRN 61233)
 
PHL 350: Philosophy of Language (Also listed as EH 393)

Language; its nature, structure, and uses. Reference, meaning, communication, and interpretation; Russell, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, and Quine, among others. One previous PHL course or permission of instructor required.

Time Offered/Instructor:

 
PHL 390: Education and Justice

This course will be a semester-long discussion of several questions regarding education in our society. What is the role of education? How do we balance the interests of the state, parents, and children when deciding what to require in terms of education? Given our commitment to respect for different cultures, how are we to design a curriculum that reflects this respect, particularly when issues like religion and sex education are so controversial? What is educational equality, and how much do we really care about achieving it? The course focuses less on educational theory and more on the political and ethical principles governing educational policy in the United States.

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • MWF 11:15 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., Brynn Welch (CRN 62408)

400-Level Courses

PHL 490: Education and Justice (Capstone)
 

This course will be a semester-long discussion of several questions regarding education in our society. What is the role of education? How do we balance the interests of the state, parents, and children when deciding what to require in terms of education? Given our commitment to respect for different cultures, how are we to design a curriculum that reflects this respect, particularly when issues like religion and sex education are so controversial? What is educational equality, and how much do we really care about achieving it? The course focuses less on educational theory and more on the political and ethical principles governing educational policy in the United States.

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • MWF 11:15 a.m. – 12:05 p.m., Brynn Welch (CRN 62409)
PHL 490: Philosophy of Language (Capstone)
 

Language is a powerful tool for shaping the world. Humans use words, gestures, and symbols to communicate ideas and attitudes, to form cooperative bonds, and to coerce others into doing what we want. What makes this possible? The philosophical study of language seeks to understand this power so that we can use it reflectively and responsibly. In this course students will be introduced to classic texts from 20th century analytic philosophy of language to give them a foundational knowledge of semantics and pragmatics, including theories of reference, meaning, speech acts, and expression. Along the way we will explore the practical applications of these theories to social and political issues in the 21st century, including discussions of topics like pornography, moral discourse, slurs, testimonial injustice, and propaganda.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 498: Philosophy Internship
 

On-campus and off-campus training positions in fields utilizing critical language and writing skills. Students should contact Dr. Welch to discuss available positions and application procedures. Student must be a Philosophy major or minor.

Time Offered/Instructor:

PHL 499: Directed Studies - RES
 

Special arrangement opportunity for in-depth study. Permission of Instructor Only.

Time Offered/Instructor:

  • CRN 61024)