Cultural Lens

Cultural Lens: Film & Speaker Series introduces films, scholars, authors, artists, and activists to campus to address various topics and how they are being defined and portrayed through the media. Using these illustrations, we aim to explore and drive discussion on its accuracy while addressing legitimized myths and barriers along the road to finding common ground. Co-sponsors are UAB Student Involvment and Student Multicultural and Diversity Programs.

Dates for 2018-2019

October 30 - "LA 92"

A little over twenty-five years after the verdict in the Rodney King trial sparked several days of protests, violence and looting in Los Angeles, filmmakers examine that tumultuous period known as the "LA Riots" through rarely seen archival footage. After the film, panelists will discuss their reflections, lessons to be gained, and facilitate a larger conversation among the audience.

Heritage Hall
Room 102
6:00pm


November 28 - "The [Re]Invention of Western Civilization: Human Rights, Civil Rights, and Indigenous Rights" w/ Robert A. Williams, Jr

After centuries of war, conquest, colonization and genocide, American Indians continue to assert their rights under treaties with the United States, as citizens under the Constitution, and as indigenous peoples with rights to self-determination under international law. Drawing on the protests of American Indian "Water Protectors" against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota as a framework for understanding and contrasting the unique legal status and rights of tribal Indians in the United States, Lumbee legal scholar and human rights lawyer Robert A. Williams, Jr. argues for the re-invention of Western Civilization according to an indigenized vision of law and justice for a multicultural world.

Hill Student Center
Alumni Theater
6:00pm


February 6 - "Stamped from the Beginning: The Defintive History of Racist Ideas in America" w/ Ibram X. Kendi, Ph.D.

Ibram X. Kendi, PhD currently serves as professor and director of the Antiracist Research & Policy Center in the Department of History at American University and an award-winning scholar of racism and antiracism and a New York Times best-selling author. His second book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America (Nation, 2016), Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis. The book won the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction. At 34 years old, he was the youngest ever winner of the NBA for Nonfiction. Stamped was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and a NAACP Image Award. Stamped was named to several Best Books of 2016 lists, including by the Boston Globe, The Root, The Washington Post, and Buzzfeed. The Washington Post also named Stamped the most ambitious book of 2016. 

Hill Student Center
Alumni Theater
6:00pm