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UAB’s Oh receives prestigious lifetime award from AANEM
UAB’s Oh receives prestigious lifetime award from AANEM
Oh honored with lifetime award from the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

shin ohShin J. Oh, M.D., professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, will receive a lifetime achievement award from the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine. The award recognizes the breadth and depth of his contributions to the electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular fields.

“Dr. Oh is internationally recognized as a pioneer in electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular medicine, and has contributed significantly to our clinical diagnosis and treatments in the field over the last four decades,” said Eroboghene E. Ubogu, M.D., professor of neurology and neurobiology and director of the UAB Division of Neuromuscular Diseases. “His legacy at UAB is unquestionable, and he is richly deserving of the 2015 AANEM Lifetime Achievement Award, which formally recognizes his career long excellence in patient care, education and research.”

Oh obtained his medical degree from Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, followed by residency in neurology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. In 1970, he joined the faculty of the UAB School of Medicine, becoming chief of Neurology at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, as well as the director of the electromyography and evoked potential laboratory, and director of the Muscle and Nerve Histopathology Laboratory, titles he would hold for the next 40 years — one of the longest such tenures in the history of American medicine. 

“It is humbling to receive the highest honor given by the AANEM — the one professional organization I have treasured most throughout my career,” said Oh. “I can proudly show this to my grandchildren, telling them that their grandpa has played a small but significant role in the development of electrodiagnostic medicine.”

Oh has served in many capacities for the AANEM, including chairing numerous committees, courses and workshops over the last four decades. Through his continuous involvement with the AANEM, he has broadened knowledge of electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular medicine by identifying unresolved clinical and research issues, designing and performing research, and publishing conclusions. 

A prolific author, he has produced 230 articles, 28 books and book chapters, and 237 abstracts. He is an exceptional educational writer with a particular gift for clearly and directly explaining even the most complex of physiological and histological methods. He has also written numerous texts that have become classics of the field.

UAB ranked among the world’s top 150 by Center for World University Rankings
UAB ranked among the world’s top 150 by Center for World University Rankings

UAB has been ranked among the top 150 universities in the world by the Center for World University Rankings.

world rankingClick to enlarge The University of Alabama at Birmingham has been ranked 146th internationally and 70th in the United States by the Center for World University Rankings, the highest of any institution in Alabama.

According to its website, CWUR publishes the only global university ranking that measures the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.

The CWUR uses eight indicators to rank the world’s top 1,000 universities, including quality of education, alumni employment, quality of faculty, publications, influence, citations, broad impact and patents.

To see the entire list or learn more about specific criteria used in rankings, visit cwur.org.

NIH awards nearly $34 million to UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science
NIH awards nearly $34 million to UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science
This renewing of UAB’s prestigious Center for Translational Science Award will bolster research and workforce development at UAB and throughout its regional partner network in the Southeast.

news CCTS Fostering ResearchWritten by Christina Crowe

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Clinical and Translational Science $33.59 million over four years to continue the center’s programs advancing translational research.

Since its initial funding in 2008 through Alabama’s only Center for Translational Science Award to work toward innovative discoveries for better health, the UAB CCTS has nurtured UAB research, accelerating the process of translating laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, training a new generation of clinical and translational researchers, and engaging communities in clinical research efforts.

The CCTS will continue to advance its mission to accelerate the delivery of new drugs, methodologies and practices to patients at UAB and throughout a partner network of 11 institutions in the Southeast.

“We are excited by the capacity to continue to enhance our institution’s and our region’s innovative research and medical care,” said Robert Kimberly, M.D., UAB CCTS director. “Through internal and external partnerships, as well as a robust clinical environment and cutting-edge informatics and clinical trial resources, we look forward to working with our patients over the course of their lifespan.”

Congress launched the CTSA program in 2006, which is overseen by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

The amount of this award, more than double its previous funding awarded in 2008 and one of the largest at UAB, reflects an unmatched enthusiasm for the CCTS and its affiliated programs. It includes funding for 10 annual pre-doctoral training awards, 10 summer training awards, and eight career development awards for senior postdoctoral fellows or faculty-level candidates.

“Our training programs continue to foster a culture of responsible, ethical practice among students, faculty and clinicians conducting human subjects research,” Kimberly said. “The NIH’s support of our expansive partner network, encompassing 11 regional academic and medical institutions throughout Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi, will allow us to further grow our scope of practices and research resources as we look to tackle health disparities in the Southeast.”

Through One Great Community, the CCTS’ community engagement enterprise, and the Community Health Innovation Awards, the CCTS engages Greater Birmingham­­-area residents in innovative programs designed by community members to improve their neighborhoods.

“UAB is fully committed to the goals of the CCTS and to its continued development as a hub for clinical and translational research in the Southeast,” said UAB President Ray L. Watts. “This significant renewal speaks to the tremendous work and vision of our CCTS leadership and team, as well as our clinical infrastructure, scientific strengths, informatics expertise, training programs, and biostatistical and research design assistance.

“The CCTS touches researchers in all UAB schools and across the partner network, and we are thrilled that this important work will continue with the confidence and support of the NIH.”

news CCTS Next GenerationClick to enlargeState and regional impact

“The growth of the Center for Clinical and Translational Science at UAB will foster economic development in the state and throughout the region,” said Senator Richard Shelby. “With a history of providing optimal clinical care and innovation in human health, UAB’s receipt of this prestigious award enables the continued development of the workforce that is necessary to meet the needs of future research advancement.”

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley, himself a physician, voiced his appreciation for the CCTS’ initiatives. “The center has been highly effective in providing assistance in the state’s efforts to eliminate the health disparities seen throughout our region,” Bentley said. “Whether across the life course or in underserved groups disproportionately affected by cancer, stroke, heart conditions and other diseases prevalent in our state, the center has been exemplary in reaching out to our citizens.”

UAB Vice President, Research and Economic Development Richard Marchase, Ph.D., says he is particularly pleased that the CCTS is building on UAB’s history of serving populations burdened by health disparities through its partnerships with other state and regional institutions committed to advancing health through translational research. “It is through this culture of commitment and collaboration,” he said, “that we have become a national leader in biomedical research.”

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