A phone scam targeting college students across the country is spoofing the FBI's phone number, threatening students and parents that they will be arrested if they do not pay thousands of dollars for such alleged debts as tuition, student loans or parking tickets.

The FBI has warned consumers to be on alert for such scams. Similar scams — in which malicious callers pretend to be law enforcement — have targeted UAB students in recent months, even costing them and their parents money.

The FBI will never call private citizens requesting money.

Often, callers in such scams appear to have students' personal information, but it is important to note that there has been no breach of personal information at UAB. Malicious callers often try to solicit more personal information from their victims over the course of the call.

If students or parents receive a call that seems suspicious, they should disconnect immediately and notify law enforcement.

If you receive these calls, do not follow the caller's instructions. Instead, the FBI advises you should:

  • Notify your banking institutions.
  • Contact the three major credit bureaus and request an alert be put on your file.
  • Contact your local law enforcement agencies if you feel you are in immediate danger.
  • File a complaint through the Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov.
Blazer Express

Need to log on to WiFi while you're communiting across campus?

UAB IT is working with Parking & Transportation Service to outfit all of the Blazer Express buses with digital signage and WiFi. The digital signs will convey emergency information as well as general content from around campus.

In addition, all buses will have a WiFi hotspot for improved connectivity to the internet. 

The signs and WiFi are in testing currently and will be piloted on two buses over the next four to six weeks. Plans are to roll out to all buses in the coming months.
April CyberSecuritySign
Planning a vacation? People are frequently more vulnerable when traveling because a break from their regular routine or encounters with unfamiliar situations often result in less cautious behavior. If this sounds like you, or someone you know, these five tips will help you protect yourself and CyberSecurityTip Iconguard your privacy.


  • Track that device! Install a device finder or manager on your mobile device in case it's lost or stolen. Make sure it has remote wipe capabilities and also protects against malware.
  • Avoid social media announcements about your travel plans. It's tempting to share your upcoming vacation plans with family and friends, but consider how this might make you an easy target for local or online thieves. While traveling, avoid using social media to "check in" to airports and consider posting those beautiful photos after you return home. Find out how burglars are using your vacation posts to target you in this infographic.
  • Traveling soon? If you're traveling with a laptop or mobile device, remove or encrypt confidential information. Consider using a laptop or device designated for travel with no personal information, especially when traveling out of the country.
  • Limit personal information stored on devices. Use a tool like Identity Finder to locate your personally identifiable information (e.g., SSN, credit card numbers, or bank accounts) on your computer, then secure or remove that information.
  • Physically protect yourself and your devices. Use a laptop lock, avoid carrying identification cards, shred sensitive paperwork before you recycle it, and watch out for "shoulder surfers" at the ATM.
 
UAB IT is committed to empowering the success of the University’s students, faculty, staff and researchers through technology.

To ensure that UAB IT is responding to those technology needs, the University community is invited to become active participants in building an IT roadmap for campus. Visit uab.edu/empoweruab to see a timeline of the strategic plan process, read about the strategic imperatives and see the schedule of town halls.

“UAB is a world-class educational and research university that deserves a world-class IT organization,” Vice President and CIO Curtis Carver said. “We want our students, faculty and staff to help co-author the IT Strategic Plan to help us prioritize technology improvements worthy of advancing UAB.”

Seven committees — one for each of UAB IT’s strategic imperatives — will begin meeting April 4 to preview the draft strategic plan. The following week, UAB IT will begin hosting 14 open town halls, with two scheduled for each imperative. Click here to view the schedule for town halls.

Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend the town halls to provide input on the plan. After those meetings, the committees will review and incorporate feedback before a series of review poster sessions.

Students, faculty and staff will then be able to review the draft strategic plan and make comments before the final strategic plan is published in June.


Page 1 of 14