Would a share in UAB’s supercomputer help you with groundbreaking research?

UAB IT is offering a unique opportunity for UAB faculty and researchers to invest in the UAB research computing infrastructure by providing a dollar-for-dollar match toward the purchase of compute resources. UAB’s research computing cluster is one of the fastest in the state.

The matching program effectively enables the researcher to get priority access to twice the compute resources in which they invest.

Priority access will be implemented through scheduler policies, ensuring the maximum wait time to access those priority compute resources will not exceed two hours.

When these resources are not in use, they will be available to all cluster users who have individual jobs that take less than two hours to execute (i.e., these resources will be part of the express queue). These resources will be available to the user in this mode for a period of three years, after which the priority to use expires, and they will be added to the general compute pool.

Since there is a limited amount of funds set aside for this matching program, requests are reviewed on a first-come, first-served basis and approved based on the matching amount and specific needs for the purchase.

The matching program for the 2016-2017 fiscal year has $150,000 available for matching and is restricted to specific hardware configurations and only minor variations to these configurations are allowed (e.g., additional RAM). The configurations that are currently supported are:

  • Two Intel Xeon E5-2680 v4 2.4GHz CPUs (total 28 cores) and four NVIDIA Tesla P100 16GB GPUs without NVLINK; 256 GB RAM; EDR InfiniBand - $32,000
  • Two Intel Xeon E5-2680 v4 2.4GHz CPUs (total 28 cores) and four NVIDIA Tesla P100 16GB GPUs with NVLINK; 256 GB RAM; EDR InfiniBand - $38,000
The purchased resources will be operated and supported by the UAB IT as a standard part the cluster. All existing procedures and policies regarding access and usage to the cluster remain the same. These resources will be accessed through the existing job scheduler and workload manager (SLURM). Advanced reservation of these resources will be available as needed. 


A number of UAB students and employees have received scam emails tempting them with potential job offers.

The emails, with the subject line “job/internship vacancy,” come from multiple senders who are impersonating legitimate companies or brands.

The text of the message is similar to the following:

“Your resume was forwarded to me from your school career centre in response to an employment/job vacancy. Kindly get back to me at your earliest convenience if you are still looking for an opportunity to pursue.”

These email scams are likely intended to try to steal personal information or may even try to get the recipients involved, unintentionally, in illegal activity.

Students and employees should be wary of any unsolicited emails gauging your interest in a job — especially if you did not apply to the company.

Hover over the email address to check that the sender name matches the email address. Find other tips for detecting phishing emails in the video above.

If you receive a similar email, you should report it to UAB IT’s information security team by clicking the “PhishMe Reporter” button in Outlook, or by forwarding it to phishing@uab.edu.

According to the FBI, such employment email scams commonly target college students.


  • Scammers post online job advertisements soliciting college students for administrative positions.
  • The student employee receives counterfeit checks in the mail or via e-mail and is instructed to deposit the checks into their personal checking account.
  • The scammer then directs the student to withdraw the funds from their checking account and send a portion, via wire transfer, to another individual. Often, the transfer of funds is to a “vendor,” purportedly for equipment, materials, or software necessary for the job.
  • Subsequently, the checks are confirmed to be fraudulent by the bank.


  • "You will need some materials/software and also a time tracker to commence your training and orientation and also you need the software to get started with work. The funds for the software will be provided for you by the company via check. Make sure you use them as instructed for the software and I will refer you to the vendor you are to purchase them from, okay."
  • "I have forwarded your start-up progress report to the HR Dept. and they will be facilitating your start-up funds with which you will be getting your working equipment from vendors and getting started with training."
  • "Enclosed is your first check. Please cash the check, take $300 out as your pay, and send the rest to the vendor for supplies."


  • The student's bank account may be closed due to fraudulent activity and a report could be filed by the bank with a credit bureau or law enforcement agency.
  • The student is responsible for reimbursing the bank the amount of the counterfeit checks.
  • The scamming incident could adversely affect the student’s credit record.
  • The scammers often obtain personal information from the student while posing as their employer, leaving them vulnerable to identity theft.
  • Scammers seeking to acquire funds through fraudulent methods could potentially utilize the money to fund illicit criminal or terrorist activity.


  • Never accept a job that requires depositing checks into your account or wiring portions to other individuals or accounts.
  • Many of the scammers who send these messages are not native English speakers. Look for poor use of the English language in e-mails such as incorrect grammar, capitalization, and tenses.
  • Forward suspicious e-mails to the college’s IT personnel and report to the FBI. Tell your friends to be on the lookout for the scam.
  • If you have been a victim of this scam or any other Internet-related scam, you may file a complaint with the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov and notify your campus police.
Sending PII
Sending Social Security numbers or medical record numbers via email can make you or others more vulnerable to identity theft.

UAB IT will soon implement policy tip warnings via email if it appears you are trying to send a Social Security number or medical record number via your UAB email account.

These warnings are intended to alert you to potential danger and help you protect your data and the information of others.

The popup policy tip will say: "The content of this email appears to conflict with UAB Policy regarding unsecured transmission of Social Security numbers, medical record numbers or other personally identifiable information. Be safe and review the email content before sending."

With the introduction of the policy tip, emails will not yet be blocked from being sent. But emails that appear to include Social Security or medical record number information will eventually be blocked — both in incoming and outgoing emails.

A policy tip has already been established to prevent UAB email users from sending credit card numbers.

“Sending credit card information, Social Security numbers, dates of birth and other personal or financial information is extremely dangerous and could leave you or others vulnerable to identity theft,” said Brian Rivers, assistant vice president and chief information security officer. “Our goal with these policy tips is to help protect our students, faculty and staff.”
UAB IT has completed the migration of all faculty and staff email accounts to Office 365.

The change allows UAB faculty and staff to take advantage of the same email system used by students. Office 365 is a cloud-based system that offers new tools and continues upgrades to improve the service and environment.

The new link to online mail is mail.uab.edu. That email link will be changed on the UAB Quicklinks, which appears on all UAB web sites, on Wedesday, July 12.

Learn more about Office 365 here.
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