• 2017 graduation

    The department held its 2017 resident and fellow graduation on Friday, June 2, at B&A Warehouse. We had a record turnout (nearly 200 guests) and a terrific time!

    Our Resident Graduates:

    Brooke Apel Bell, M.D.

    Cara Marie Bevinetto, M.D.

    Christopher Michael Blakely, M.D., C.M.Q.

    Matthew Glenn Broyles, M.D.

    Michael David Chestnut, M.D.

    Grace Powell Flowers, M.D.

    Haley Mimms Fuller, M.D.

    William James Graugnard, M.D.

    Jonathan George Kentros, M.D.

    Brent David Kidd, M.D.

    Catherine Lauren Mallory, D.O.

    Candace Lanier McKee, M.D.

    Merrick McHosernbert Meese, M.D.

    Garrett David Scott, M.D.

    David Patrick Shelley, M.D.

    Jason Patrick Skelley, M.D., C.M.Q.

    Casey Clark Smith, M.D.

    Timothy Andrew Torres, M.D.

    Michelle Diann Tubinis, M.D.

    Amanda Lynne Walden, M.D.

    William King Wood, M.D., C.M.Q.


    Our Fellow Graduates: 


    Matthew Stephen Hull, M.D.

    Jacob Alexander Lessing, M.D.

    Nathaniel Lee Smith, M.D.

    Michael Patrick Curriston, M.D.

    John Eliot Huidekoper, M.D.

    Sarah Lindsay McCormick, M.D.

    Weifeng Song, M.D., Ph.D.

    Jordan Scott Garman, D.O.

    Christopher Alan Paul, M.D.

    Channing Carl Twyner, M.D.

    Caylen Nevins Schlitz, M.D.

    Jyoti Pankaj Dangle, M.D.

    Katherine Elizabeth Turk, M.D.

    In addition, the department gave out several awards:
    Bert Pierce, M.D. was recognized as 2016-17 Teacher of the Year.
    Joshua Woolard, M.D., received the 12th annual J. Antonio Aldrete, M.D., M.S., Award for Excellence in Pain Medicine.
    Tim Torres, M.D., received the 18th annual Ray J. Delfalque, M.D., Award for Outstanding Performance in Regional Anesthesia.
    Eric Clary, M.D., and Mike Gibson, M.D., received the Robert Goodloe McGahey, M.D., Awards for Excellence in Medical Student Teaching.
    William Wood, M.D., C.M.Q., received the Outstanding Graduate Award.
    Haley Fuller, M.D., received the fourth annual Outstanding Pediatric Anesthesiology Award.
    Jason Skelley, M.D., C.M.Q., received the third annual Boudreaux Quality and Patient Safety Award.

    Resident research awards included:
    Matt Broyles, M.D.; Chris Blakely, M.D., C.M.Q.; and Brooke Bell, M.D.

    LEAD Program recognition awards included:
    Micheal Chestnut, M.D., and Merrick Meese, M.D. for the Master of Science in Health Care Administration Award.
    Chris Blakely, M.D., C.M.Q.; Jason Skelley, M.D., C.M.Q.; and William Wood, M.D., C.M.Q. for the Medical Quality and Patient Safety (C.M.Q.) Certificate Award.
    Tim Torres, M.D., and William Wood, M.D., C.M.Q., for the Certification by the National Board of Echocardiography (TEE) award.

     
  • Warren Chaz

    DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY AS A RESIDENT
    Our days typically start early but I try to check emails and get started with some coffee before heading into work. Ideally, I have reviewed my cases for the next day and arrive to prepare my OR and to converse with my patients, as well as the surgery team, if needed. The number and types of cases we do as residents varies tremendously from day-to-day, which is great for training. After I am relieved from the OR, I typically prepare for the next day’s cases and read/study before dinner plans. (I probably eat out too much, but I still enjoy cooking with my wife a couple times per week). 

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE ANESTHESIOLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?
    For me, anesthesiology provided the ability to care for all types of patients and learn/understand the physiologic differences that each of those groups possess. Anesthesiology is unique in that we care for all age ranges but also see all types of pathology (cardiac, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, etc). Thus, we get to work with nearly every other specialty in the hospital and in multiple different environments.

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACE IN RESIDENCY?
    To keep climbing! You are on a steep learning curve during residency and you really have to commit to grasping every opportunity that comes your way. Four years sounds like a long time, but it’s gone before you know it. Becoming a lifelong learner is essential to taking advantages of the learning opportunities you’ll have on a day-to-day basis but also for continued success.

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?
    I enjoy being outdoors, spending time with friends and family, playing golf, and traveling.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UAB FOR ANESTHESIA RESIDENCY?
    UAB was hands-down the most well-rounded program on my list. First off, I wanted a place that I knew, without a doubt, would help me become an excellent clinician, which UAB certainly provides. What sealed the deal for me was the quality of people I met at UAB. I am blessed to work with our faculty, my co-residents, and everyone else in our anesthesiology department; being able to enjoy your work and the people you are doing it with on a daily basis is special. Moreover, there are opportunities for leadership development, advanced degrees, and mission work.

    WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS AFTER FINISHING YOUR RESIDENCY?
    I am doing the cardiothoracic anesthesiology fellowship at UAB.

    WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU TO BETTER PREPARE YOU TO BE A CHIEF RESIDENT?
    Always do your best and, more importantly, take solace in that fact. Not every decision or choice will have the perfect outcome, but if you always remember you did your best with what you had you’ll be better prepared to learn from your mistakes and grow.

    WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE QUALITIES OR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD ANESTHESIOLOGIST?
    Even keeled, pragmatic, a good communicator, and someone who genuinely cares deeply for all of their patients.
  • Briggs John

    DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY AS A RESIDENT
    Get up, usually between 4:30 and 5, to a brewing pot of coffee. A quick shower helps to wake me up, and I get ready quickly. Then I'm off to the OR for whatever the day may hold: new blocks, interesting cases, and always something to learn. At the end of the day, I head home to my beautiful wife and get ready for the next day.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE ANESTHESIOLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?
    There’s nothing else to choose. I love the integration of every part of medicine with immediate feedback. I wanted to know I could take care of the sickest patient; and now, I can.

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACE IN RESIDENCY?
    Intern year is hard because you are an intern. CA1 year is hard because you are an intern all over again—except it's your chosen specialty. Every time you have a problem, it’s the first time you’ve seen it. CA2 year is hard because you are assuming more responsibility and you realize how much you have learned. CA3 is hard because you are trying to soak everything up because it goes by so fast.

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?
    My wife and I like to be active, whether at the gym or trail running. We enjoy it. We also enjoy traveling, specifically for food and wine tasting.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UAB FOR ANESTHESIA RESIDENCY?
    UAB provided an opportunity to train at a world-class institution where we would be able to afford to live well. My wife finished her internal medicine residency and absolutely loved it. We have made friends that I have no doubt we will keep as long as we can use a phone. To put it simply, the internal medicine program told us during our intern orientation: "We will push you beyond your comfort zone; that is where learning takes place. Because at UAB, we are all pursuing excellence, but with an important distinction: Our motto is excellence without ego.” I had already started my residency at this point, but I knew it was the only place for me.

    WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS AFTER FINISHING YOUR RESIDENCY?
    I will be going back into the Air Force as an active duty anesthesiologist. I am awaiting my orders.

    WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU TO BETTER PREPARE YOU TO BE A CHIEF RESIDENT?
    I wish the intricacies of scheduling could be relayed without having to suffer through mistakes. Experiential learning is the only way to gain the knowledge, but I wish there were a better way.

    WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE QUALITIES OR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD ANESTHESIOLOGIST?
    Despite a common myth, anesthesiologists must be incredibly personable and sensitive. In a matter of minutes, vital information must be obtained prior to anesthetizing. Simultaneously, the trust of a patient and often a family must be garnered in order to comfort loved ones and reassure patients on what may be the most difficult day of his or her life. One must be competent in every aspect of patient care, but our job is more than putting people to sleep and waking them up.
  • McCoy

    DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY AS A RESIDENT
    A day as an anesthesia resident starts EARLY! We set up our assigned operating room prior to 6 a.m. lecture then start our cases around 7 a.m. Most days, residents are relieved by the call team or late-stay CRNAs at 3 p.m., which is a huge bonus of training at UAB. After 3 p.m., we are typically able to take moonlighting call, study, exercise, or spend time with family and friends. Every evening we call the attending to establish a plan for the following day’s cases. The days are long but fun and full of learning from patients, attendings, and upper-level residents.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE ANESTHESIOLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?
    Choosing anesthesia was actually a career change for me. I completed a pediatric residency first, then realized I wanted to do something in the acute care realm without doing ICU. I decided to look into completing another residency in anesthesia with the goal of a career in pediatric anesthesia. This specialty fits me well because it is a highly procedural, team-based field where the daily responsibilities change constantly.

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACE IN RESIDENCY?
    The biggest challenge for me is balancing work and home life. I have a 4-year-old son and 1-year-old daughter who keep me busy! I also have an incredibly supportive husband who provides continual support and motivation but also works full time. I always wish there more hours in the day to work, play, study, spend time with my kids and husband, and sleep.

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?
    I love to cook and try new restaurants here in Birmingham. I enjoy photography, especially taking pictures of my kids, and am exploring how to use my camera and Photoshop to enhance the (million) photographs I take. When I have time, I love to sew and have continued to make fun things for my kids.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UAB FOR ANESTHESIA RESIDENCY?
    I chose UAB for many reasons! I loved the vibe I got from the residents when I interviewed — everyone seemed to genuinely love what they were doing. And the time at work vs. personal time seemed ideal. I also thought Birmingham was a vibrant city where I would love to raise my children.

    WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS AFTER FINISHING YOUR RESIDENCY?
    After residency, I will be fulfilling my career goal of a Pediatric Anesthesia Fellowship at Mayo (Wolfsons Children’s Hospital) in Jacksonville, Florida.

    WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU TO BETTER PREPARE YOU TO BE A CHIEF RESIDENT?
    We make A LOT of schedules using Excel; I wish I had better skills in using it when I started. But I've learned many tricks along the way.

    WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE QUALITIES OR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD ANESTHESIOLOGIST?
    A good anesthesiologist has to be quick thinking and steadfast under pressure. We have to stay calm and work with various team members to achieve a common outcome, sometimes under the most high-pressure situations. Additionally, anesthesiologists have to have exceptional procedural skills, as we are sometimes looked to as the experts in certain fields (intubation, central-line placement, and regional anesthesia procedures).
  • On behalf of Susan Black, M.D.:

    I am pleased to tell you that we had a very strong interview season, filling our 21 positions with a very diverse group of physicians. These physicians are all joining our four-year categorical residency program in June 2018:

    2018 Match Day

    We matched 21 residents from 15 medical schools, including 3 females and 18 males. Seven are Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society members; three are Gold Humanism Honor Society members. Please join me in welcoming them on board!
  • Osunsanmi

    DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY AS A RESIDENT

    A typical day usually begins with some form of preparation to care for a patient, whether it be setting up your OR, setting up for a regional anesthetic, or rounding on patients in the unit. It usually ends just before you've exhausted your mental capacity for the day in an attempt to take the best care of patients that you can. 

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE ANESTHESIOLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?

    It is one of the specialties in medicine that is truly multi-disciplinary. 

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACE IN RESIDENCY?

    The hardest thing is trying to balance the rigorous nature of residency and still trying to have a life outside of it. 

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?

    I play and watch sports (go Lakers!), work out, travel, and hang out with my friends as much as I can.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UAB FOR ANESTHESIA RESIDENCY?

    I choose UAB for the excellent clinical training and camaraderie among the residents. 

    WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS AFTER FINISHING YOUR RESIDENCY?

    I plan to join a private practice group in South Florida.

    WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU TO BETTER PREPARE YOU TO BE A CHIEF RESIDENT?

    Every decision you make won't be the most popular decision.

    WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE QUALITIES OR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD ANESTHESIOLOGIST?

    One who has the capacity to treat everyone the same, regardless of ethnic, cultural, or religious background. 

     

  • Norman

    DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY AS A RESIDENT

    For most OR rotations, we arrive to the OR by 5:30 a.m. to set up then attend morning lecture before heading to holding to meet our first patient of the morning. Cases generally start at 7:00 a.m. and residents are relieved at 3:00 p.m. to do their call duties, moonlighting, studies, or extracurricular activities. We generally spend some of this time reviewing our cases for the next day and discussing the anesthetic plan with our attending.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE ANESTHESIOLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?

    I enjoy the acuity of the care, the physiologic management, the procedural environment and skill set, the breadth of cases, and the collaboration across the hospital.

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACE IN RESIDENCY?

    Always striving for a greater understanding of your patients and their management while also balancing life outside of the hospital. Every day brings a new set of exciting challenges to promote your growth; sometimes you don’t want to blink to avoid something passing you by.

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?

    I enjoying spending time with my family and friends whether that be outdoors, traveling, grilling, or simply watching a movie together.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UAB FOR ANESTHESIA RESIDENCY?

    1. The People: The residents and faculty were incredible both personally and professionally, and I am honored to work alongside them each day.  
    2. The Program: The didactics were outstanding, the case variety unparalleled, the progressive autonomy inspiring, and the mentorship invaluable.  
    3. The Pluses: The Department truly invests in each and every resident to promote their growth outside of anesthesiology through research, leadership development, certificates and degrees, and mission work.

    WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS AFTER FINISHING YOUR RESIDENCY?

    I am thankful to be continuing at UAB for both cardiothoracic and critical care fellowships.

    WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU TO BETTER PREPARE YOU TO BE A CHIEF RESIDENT?

    Communicate consistently and know that sometimes listening is all that’s needed to calm. 

    WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE QUALITIES OR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD ANESTHESIOLOGIST? 

    Unbridled compassion, fascination with pathophysiology, pragmatic thoughtfulness, confident humility, effective communication, equanimity, dependability, and passion.

    ANYTHING YOU WANT TO ADD? 

    I greatly appreciate the support of my co-residents, co-chiefs, staff, and faculty. It has been an honor to serve alongside such an esteemed group of colleagues which have truly become an extended family.

     

  • Schlitz

    DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY AS A RESIDENT

    The typical day depends on the rotation, but we usually arrive around 5:30 to set up our OR prior to morning conference. Cases start at 7:00 (or 8:00 on Tuesday), and residents are relived at 3:00 unless on-call or participating in internal moonlighting.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE ANESTHESIOLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?

    I enjoy the fast pace and the acuity of patient care. There are new challenges to face every day. 

    WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES YOU FACE IN RESIDENCY?

    There is something to learn from every patient and situation. We frequently take care of critically ill patients with complex medical problems and are sometimes required to make decisions quickly.

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?

    I love spending time with family and friends. I enjoy playing golf and just spending time outdoors. My wife and I travel frequently and love visiting new places.

    WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UAB FOR ANESTHESIA RESIDENCY?

    UAB offers outstanding clinical training that allows graduates to be successful in any practice environment they choose to pursue. The close-knit community of the department (co-residents, faculty, and staff) make UAB Anesthesia special. The camaraderie and focus on wellness make time spent in training enjoyable.   

    WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS AFTER FINISHING YOUR RESIDENCY?

    I will be joining a practice in the community.

    WHAT’S THE ONE THING YOU WISH SOMEONE HAD TOLD YOU TO BETTER PREPARE YOU TO BE A CHIEF RESIDENT?

    You must focus on doing what’s best for the group rather than pleasing everyone. (I was told this but didn’t appreciate the challenge initially.)

    WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE QUALITIES OR CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD ANESTHESIOLOGIST?

    Calm under pressure, team-player, dependable, compassionate, strong communicator

    ANYTHING YOU WANT TO ADD?

    Thank you to the faculty, staff, my co-residents, and co-chiefs that have helped make this year, and residency in general, such a great experience!

  • 161207 The Surgery Ship TV Series Mercy Ships 0084. lo res


    Dr. Brian Barki, who completed his residency with the UAB Department of Anesthesiology in 2012, is featured on a new Nat Geo show. Called The Surgery Ship,it details the dramatic stories that take place aboard a ship that docks in the poorest sections of West Africa to provide life-saving care for patients who otherwise would go without. The show has begun airing in Europe and Australia—stay tuned for U.S. dates. Meanwhile, we caught up with Dr. Barki about the experience.

    Q: How did you become involved in Mercy Ships?

    A: I first heard about Mercy Ships during my time at UAB. I was immediately drawn to the idea of a hospital ship. I had been on medical mission trips before, in fact once with Dr. Clanton during residency. While the work I did on those previous trips was helpful, we were always very limited because of the lack of equipment, supplies, medications, etc. With Mercy Ships, we bring a first-world hospital to the people. Of course we still have our limitations, but we also have a lot more capability that opens a whole new world of possibilities. 

    After residency, I moved back to Oklahoma and had the “perfect” life (a great job, house, friends, church, etc). I was content for a few years, but somewhere along the way, I started getting an unsettled feeling in my heart. Something was missing. My wife, Jamie, said, “Why don’t we volunteer with Mercy Ships?” Turns out she was half kidding, but that planted a seed in me. I wrestled over the decision for a while, and after finding out more about what Mercy Ships was about, I thought, “How could I NOT be a part of this?”

    I initially volunteered short-term with Mercy Ships in Congo in 2013. That two-week trip was a fantastic introduction to the organization. The following year, I returned, this time with Jamie, to get her thoughts on how she felt our family could do in this setting. She was all for it. I quit my job in May 2015 and have been with Mercy Ships since that time.

    Q: How did National Geographic become involved?

    A: There was a “Surgery Ship” film done a few years ago in Guinea. I believe Nat Geo approached Mercy Ships with interest in following that film up with an eight-part series. 

    Q: What was it like to participate in a documentary series? Any behind-the-scenes scoop that illustrates the complexity of filming a medical series?

    A: At first, it was a little strange having a film crew around, but they were really great people, and they did a tremendous job of putting us at ease. After a while, we just got used to going about our day with the Nat Geo crew coming along with us. 

    There are many complexities to filming a medical series like this, most of them I’m probably not even aware of. They did a tremendous job of selecting patients to follow and telling their stories. I think Nat Geo really did a great job of capturing what Mercy Ships is about. 

    Q: Why do you do what you do?

    A: As volunteers with Mercy Ships, we do not get paid a salary. In fact, we have to pay monthly “crew fees” that cover our room and board. This is in addition to health insurance, plane tickets, etc. Honestly, we do this because we know God has called us to this work. For us, any other reason to leave family, friends, a great job, and the comforts of home would have been crazy. 

    MGC151028 DR BRIAN BARKI ANESTHETIST USA RP001 MIDThe patients we serve are often outcasts. Many are treated as modern-day lepers, viewed as cursed. People won’t have anything to do with them. To make matters worse, they do not have access to affordable, safe surgery. To be able to offer these patients hope and a chance for a new beginning is tremendously fulfilling and really brings me back to the whole reason I became a physician. 

    I also love that Mercy Ships continues to expand its Medical Capacity Building programs. Each country we visit, we are renovating hospitals and training more and more anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, surgeons, midwives, nurses, sterilizers, biomedical technicians, etc. We usually stay in a country for 10 months at a time. The Medical Capacity Building program is a way to invest in local healthcare systems in an effort to contribute to sustainable long-term solutions.   

    Q: What else is important that you’d like to share? …. How did UAB help shape you, or how can we help?

    A: I am so grateful for my time at UAB. Not only did I acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to be equipped to do something like this, but I was also surrounded by tremendous people, both attendings and residents. 

    UAB Anesthesiology can help by spreading the word about Mercy Ships. Tell our attendings and alumni about the opportunity to serve. UAB attendings can come serve with a resident, and I’d love to see some more UAB alumni on board! Dr. Todd Beasley has already volunteered this year. People can serve on the ship for as short as two weeks. If teaching is your passion, there are opportunities to come for one week and teach training courses on pediatric or obstetric anesthesia. 

    Tell surgeons, OR nurses, PACU nurses, ward nurses, sterilizers, etc. about the work Mercy Ships is doing. And while we need medical people, the non-medical crew are just as important. We need volunteers for any job that a hospital, a ship, or a small city might need.

    If there are people that want to be involved, but do not necessarily want to serve on the ship, there are always opportunities to partner with Mercy Ships financially. 

    More information on volunteer and giving opportunities can be found at www.mercyships.org

    161207 The Surgery Ship TV Series Mercy Ships 0084. lo res


  • Dr. Lee Ann Riesenberg, Associate Director Education, reports that everyone who recently took the American Board of Medical Qualty (AMBQ) exam passed.

    Those taking and passing the exam include: 

    • Christopher Blakely

    • Robyn Davis

    • Sean Dossett

    • Colby Duckett

    • Sara Anne Lester

    • Emma C. O’Hagan

    • Marsha Wakefield

    • William Wood

    • Laura Allen, Surgery Resident

    "Since 2013, we have had 15 faculty members, nine anesthesiology residents, one surgery resident, one medical education staff member, and three nurse practitioners pass the exam," said Dr. Riesenberg. "The ABMQ website indicates that just over 350 health care professionals are currently Certified in Medical Quality. Our department efforts have produced graduates who represents eight percent of all those currently Board Certified in Medical Quality!"

  • TubinisWe asked our 2016-17 chief residents to share their thoughts on the job. MeetMichelle Tubinis, M.D.

  • BlakelyWe asked our 2016-17 chief residents to share their thoughts on the job. Meet Chris Blakely, M.D.

  • Sadis Matalon, Ph.D., Dr.Sc. (Hon), has been tapped to become editor-in-chief of the American Physiological Society’s Physiological Reviews effective January 2018.

  • Korbe CupWe held the annual Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine golf tournament Saturday, May 6th. Four teams competed in the scramble, and Sam Korbe's dominance of the event finally ended.

  • ChestnutWe asked our 2016-17 chief residents to share their thoughts on the job. Meet Michael Chestnut, M.D.

  • UAB Pain Clinic 2017From Left: Alethia Baldwin Sellers, MD, MSQ; Brandon S. Brooks, MD; Prentiss Lawson, Jr., MD; Peter Nagi, MD; Marcia J. Howton, MD; Virginia Hazelrig Allred, MSN, CRNP; James Weisberg, PhD; Amy Kennedy, MSN, CRNP; Ryan Almeida, MD; Roland Short, MD.Our physicians and nurse practitioners from the UAB Pain Treatment Clinic were recently in B-Metro magazine. What a talented and great-looking bunch!

  • Jianguo Gu 1Dr. Jianguo Gu, M.B., Ph.D., who held the title of Edward A. Ernst, M.D., Endowed Professor, now holds the title of Edward A. Ernst, M.D., Ph.D., Endowed Chair in Anesthesiology.

  • 20170204 111225The department hosted its Difficult Airway Workshop Saturday, February 4, on the 9th floor of Jefferson Tower. The annual event, which has been held for more than a decade, drew a crowd of 67 UAB faculty, CRNAs, SRNAs, residents, and fellows. It also included eight industry vendors.

  • Research 2017Congratulations to our Division of Molecular and Translational Biomedicine. According to the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research, which tracks National Institutes of Health funding, our department now ranks 10th among U.S. anesthesiology departments.