ACHIA

2001


High-dose intravenous Acyclovir

Subject
Safety and efficacy of high-dose intravenous acyclovir in the management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections

Authors
N/A

Source
Pediatrics. 108(2):230-8, 2001 Aug.

Abstract     
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this investigation was to establish the safety of high-dose (HD) acyclovir for the treatment of neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) disease. In addition, an estimate of therapeutic efficacy was sought, both with respect to mortality and to morbidity. Virologic efficacy of HD acyclovir was also assessed. PARTICIPANTS: Infants who were </=28 days old and whose disease was considered to be caused by HSV were enrolled in this study. Patients with central nervous system (CNS; N = 28) or disseminated (N = 41) HSV infection were offered participation in the trial. A small number of patients with HSV disease limited to the skin, eyes, or mouth (SEM; N = 10) or whose disease was clinically consistent with HSV but who did not have virologic confirmation of infection (N = 9) also were enrolled on a compassionate basis. Only patients with virologically confirmed HSV disease were included in efficacy analyses. All enrolled patients were included in safety analyses. METHODS: The study was an open-label evaluation of intravenous acyclovir at dosages higher than the 30 mg/kg/d standard dosage approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The first 16 patients enrolled received intermediate-dose (ID) acyclovir (45 mg/kg/d), and the next 72 patients received HD acyclovir (60 mg/kg/d). Acyclovir was administered in 3 divided daily doses for 21 days. Neonates were assessed prospectively throughout treatment and at scheduled follow-up visits for the first 4 years of life. Data were compared with those of a previous National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group trial in which patients received standard-dose (SD) acyclovir for 10 days and in which identical methods (with the exception of acyclovir dosage and duration of therapy) were used. RESULTS: Six (21%) of 29 HD acyclovir recipients whose HSV disease remained localized to the SEM or CNS experienced neutropenia. One of the 6 had an absolute neutrophil count <500/mm(3), and 5 patients had an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) between 500/mm(3) and 1000/mm(3). In all 6 cases, the ANC recovered during continuation of acyclovir at the same dosage or after completion of acyclovir therapy, and there were no apparent adverse sequelae of the transient neutropenia. No other drug-related adverse events were reported among ID or HD recipients, and no other laboratory aberrations could be correlated specifically with antiviral therapy. The survival rate for the patients with disseminated HSV disease treated with HD acyclovir was significantly higher than for those in the previous study treated with SD acyclovir, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-7.9). For patients with CNS disease, however, survival rates were similar for the HD and SD groups. To assess the effect of HD acyclovir on survival for the entire population with neonatal HSV disease, the Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed with stratification for disease category (CNS versus disseminated). In performing this analysis, differences in mortality for each disease category were weighted to allow statistical comparison of the treatment dosage groups (HD, ID, and SD). This analysis indicated that the survival rate for patients treated with HD acyclovir was statistically significantly higher than for patients treated with SD acyclovir (OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.5-7.3). Recipients of HD acyclovir had a borderline significant decrease in morbidity compared with SD recipients, after stratification for the extent of disease (SEM vs CNS vs disseminated) and controlling for the potential confounding factors of HSV type (HSV-1 vs. HSV-2), prematurity, and disease severity (seizures). Patients treated with HD acyclovir were 6.6 times (adjusted OR; 95% CI: 0.8-113.6) as likely to be developmentally normal at 12 months of age as patients treated with SD therapy. CONCLUSION: These data support the use of a 21-day course of HD (60 mg/kg/d) intravenous acyclovir to treat neonatal CNS and disseminated HSV disease. Throughout the course of HD acyclovir therapy, serial ANC determination should be made at least twice weekly. Decreasing the acyclovir dosage or administering granulocyte colony-stimulating factor should be considered if the ANC remains below 500/mm(3) for a prolonged period.

Natural history of neonatal herpes in the Acyclovir era

Subject
Natural history of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections in the acyclovir era

Authors
N/A

Source
Pediatrics. 108(2):223-9, 2001 Aug.

Abstract     
OBJECTIVE: During the 2 decades in which effective antiviral therapies have been available for neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) disease, changes have been documented not only in the outcomes of infected infants, but also in the natural history of the disease itself. Numerous studies previously have reported that early institution of antiviral therapy is beneficial to the outcome of the disease. The objective of this study was to provide an update of neonatal HSV disease to identify means by which future improvements in the management of HSV-infected neonates can be made. DESIGN/METHODS: Neonates enrolled in 2 studies of parenteral acyclovir for the treatment of neonatal HSV disease provided the data source. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group conducted the studies between 1981 and 1997. A total of 186 patients are summarized, all of whom were treated with acyclovir. Demographic and clinical characteristics of these patients are reported. RESULTS: Comparisons between patients treated in the periods between 1981-1988 and 1989-1997 according to extent of disease revealed that the mean time between the onset of disease symptoms and initiation of therapy has not changed significantly from the early 1980s to the late 1990s. Of all patients evaluated, 40% had fetal scalp monitors during the delivery process. A significant minority of patients did not have skin vesicles at the time of their presentation and did not develop them during the acute HSV disease (39% of patients with disseminated disease; 32% of patients with central nervous system [CNS] disease; and 17% of patients with skin, eye, and/or mouth disease). Among patients with CNS disease, mortality was associated with prematurity. Among patients with disseminated HSV disease treated with acyclovir at 30 mg/kg/d, mortality was associated with aspartate transaminase elevations of >/=10 times the upper limit of normal at the time of initiation of acyclovir therapy. Mortality was also associated with lethargy at initiation of antiviral therapy for patients with disseminated disease. Patients' morbidity status was associated with the extent of disease (skin, eye, and/or mouth disease vs CNS vs disseminated). For those patients with CNS disease, morbidity was also associated with seizures at initiation of antiviral therapy. CONCLUSION: Data presented in the current comparison of neonatal HSV disease over the 2 periods (1981-1988 vs 1989-1997) demonstrate that no progress has been made in decreasing the interval between onset of HSV symptoms and initiation of antiviral therapy. Additional strides in the improvement of disease outcome may occur only if the interval between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy is shortened. The means by which this will be accomplished lie in increased consideration of neonatal HSV infections in acutely ill infants. Specific data and recommendations to facilitate this goal are contained within.