Displaying items by tag: department of ophthalmology and visual sciences

Rates of vision impairment are high among seniors living in subsidized housing, suggesting an increased need for widespread vision screening.

UAB ophthalmologists have dinner in the dark to gain better understanding of what it means to be vision-impaired.
Environmental factors like pool and ocean water seem harmless, but they can actually affect eye health. UAB experts break down how to stay safe this season.
A UAB study to explore the effects of intraocular pressure fluctuations on glaucoma receives federal funding.
Vision services backed by UAB’s Callahan Eye Hospital now available in Talladega and Sylacauga.
UAB ophthalmologists are racing to save our sight. While the number of Americans with glaucoma could double by 2050, UAB’s team of specialists and scientists is expanding knowledge about the disease. Discover how expert care, clever inventions, and engineering ingenuity could lead to early detection and new treatments in UAB Magazine.
UAB researchers are probing the secrets of subretinal drusenoid deposits, which may be a leading factor in the onset of age-related macular degeneration.
Research to Prevent Blindness has given UAB’s Department of Ophthalmology a grant to further research of retinal and optic nerve diseases
Pediatric glaucoma is a rare, but dangerous eye disease. Learn more about this potential blinding condition and how ophthalmologists at UAB’s Callahan Eye Hospital saved the vision of one young boy.
A UAB study finds that minorities with diabetes have a high rate of diabetic retinopathy, a potentially blinding eye disease, and that telemedicine might be a good way to address that condition.
A unique philanthropic partnership between Research to Prevent Blindness, EyeSight Foundation of Alabama, and Susan and Dowd Ritter will fund ophthalmology research.

Group B Streptococcus, when passed from mother to newborn during birth, is the leading cause of sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis.

Lindsay A. Rhodes, M.D., was named to the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Leadership Development Program Class of 2015. This program represents a commitment by the AAO to develop future leaders.
Amblyopia, commonly referred to as “lazy eye,” is the major cause of monocular blindness in America, affecting up to 3 percent of young children.
UAB’s Crawford Downs has been named chair-elect of the Animals in Research Committee of the Association for Research in Vision Science and Ophthalmology.
A local woman injured by a bottle rocket to the eye joins UAB Callahan Eye Hospital in urging people to not use fireworks at home.
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