Displaying items by tag: diabetes

More than 88 million Americans have prediabetes, but the good news is that this condition can be reversed with just a few simple steps. 

Migraine headaches were ruining Christopher Sheheane’s life, until a visit to UAB found the cause: a pituitary gland tumor.
Inhibition of this microRNA might improve response to newer diabetes drugs, such as Byetta, Victoza, Trulicity, Januvia, Onglyza and Tradjenta.

Complications of diabetes can lead to blindness, yet only 29.9 percent of diabetic patients studied adhered to recommendations to have an eye examination. 

Among black men, those with a high degree of West African genetic ancestry have less abdominal fat than those with a lower degree.
Recruitment for the trial continues as Myers discusses the benefits she received from participating and the knowledge she has gained to take control of her health care.
Lead author of paper published in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice journal says, while causal relationship cannot be inferred, findings are “absolutely encouraging.”
Research volunteers are needed for a UAB study to determine which combinations of Type 2 diabetes drugs work best for different groups of people.
UAB’s Loretta T. Lee, Ph.D., will seek to examine the relationship between social support and intuitive eating with glycemic control in older African-American men with type 2 diabetes.

Monika M. Safford, M.D., helped shape the new Web tool for the National Diabetes Education Program, “Promoting Medication Adherence in Diabetes.”

Three-year grant establishes consortium to better organize and support collaborative research related to the loss of functional beta cell mass in type 1 diabetes.
In “Command & Control,” the second novel by Stephen Russell, fictional retired orthopedic surgeon Mackie McKay finds himself in the middle of an infectious disease outbreak — with Ebola as a backdrop.
The “repurposing of verapamil as a beta cell survival therapy in type 1 diabetes” trial will test an approach different from any current diabetes treatment.
Research volunteers are needed for a UAB study to determine which combinations of Type 2 diabetes drugs work best for different groups of people.
Consuming a low-carbohydrate diet should be the first step taken by those with diabetes, according to a new study.
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