Displaying items by tag: research

Young cancer survivors are at higher risk of developing subsequent HPV-related cancers than the general population, but less likely to receive the HPV vaccine. Findings from the first clinical trial of its kind support making HPV vaccination a routine part of oncologic care for all young cancer survivors, researchers say.

A study conducted by UAB researchers found that using genetic information for choosing medical treatment after getting a heart stent reduces the risk of potentially fatal cardiovascular events.
Preclinical experiments show how to identify non-responding tumors and improve their response to immunotherapy, using two investigational new drugs that are permitted for human use. Physicians could immediately start investigational research in patients to test the effectiveness of this personalized approach.
The grant links researchers from different disciplines, institutions and locations to study basic mechanisms that contribute to Parkinson’s disease.

Release of TT-10 from nanoparticles improved heart function after a heart attack, accompanied by increased cardiomyocyte proliferation and smaller infarct size.

Lupus, an autoimmune disease that can attack any part of the body, can be confounding because patients often respond differently to the same treatment, and they vary widely in the severity of their symptoms.

Fecal-dominant donor microbes in the recipient patients after fecal microbe transplantation did not correlate with response to anti-PD-1 therapy.

Blood and marrow transplantation strategies have changed significantly over the past four decades; but recipients still experience excess mortality that translates into 8.7 years of life lost, according to researchers in UAB’s Institute for Cancer Outcomes and Survivorship.

Limiting neuroinflammation may represent a promising new approach to treat neurological diseases driven by neuroinflammation, such as stroke, spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain.
A study conducted by UAB researchers found that insulin resistance, a precursor to fatal cardiovascular events, is common among young adults.

Yabing Chen, Ph.D., is the first researcher at the Birmingham VA to receive this highest honor for a non-physician scientist.

The grant will explore ways to employ artificial intelligence with telehealth in rural, underserved areas of the South.

The higher infectivity correlates with mutations that increase viral binding to a cell surface glucosaminoglycan, heparan sulfate.

Pharmacogenomics has become a valuable tool for optimizing treatments and is poised to play an increasing role in clinical care.

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