Displaying items by tag: research

In this arteriolar niche, breast cancer stem cells and arteriolar endothelial cells cross-talk using a well-known signaling pathway. Targeting this pathway may offer therapeutic potential.

UAB continues to lead the way in the evolving field of social entrepreneurship: Patrick J. Murphy, Ph.D., has been recognized as one of the field’s top scholars.

Sixto Leal, M.D., Ph.D., was featured in the “Front(line) and Center” category in the Pathologist's 2021 Power List recognizing some of the most inspirational pathologists and laboratory medicine professionals in the U.S. in 2021.

UAB researchers found that death due to cardiovascular causes in the Southeastern U.S. is 16 percent higher than in the rest of the country, and an estimated 101,953 additional deaths need to be prevented by 2025 to bridge this gap.
The histone methyltransferase DOT1L — the potential target — is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, and high levels of expression correlate with reduced progression-free and overall survival.
UAB is participating in a nationwide study to treat clinically depressed patients with a VNS device — originally created for treatment of seizure disorders.
The RURAL Heart and Lung Study clinic will bring to rural communities technology that provides access to diagnostic tests that are not routinely done in rural settings. UAB researchers will examine medical, lifestyle and behavioral factors that contribute to higher health concerns in residents of Dallas and Wilcox counties.

MicroCT of infected human lung tissue, along with histology and immunohistochemistry, was used to construct images of TB granulomas, airways and vasculature.

Asif represents the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, where he also holds a national leadership position.
Two Collat School of Business marketing professors support the formation of integrative teams of marketing and sales professionals to facilitate cooperation and meaningful communication, and to mitigate workplace conflict.
A small molecule inhibitor has been identified that reduces the growth of uveal melanoma, a rare and deadly cancer of the eye.
Part of the mission of the Civitan International Research Center is to foster the next generation of scientists studying brain development.
Elizabeth Brown, Ph.D., has received a $3.1 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study epigenetic contribution to the excess risk of a precursor of multiple myeloma in African Americans.
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