Tara Bowman (right) with her father, Joseph Henry Bowman III (left), who died from lung cancer in 2016.

Tara Bowman knows the statistics by heart. She can also recite health manuals nearly from memory when it comes to cancer awareness, health disparities and the need for early screening and treatment. 

Linda Fluker (left) and Naomi King (right) showcase some of the many masks they have made and donated to their communities. (Photos submitted)

Dens, kitchens and living rooms in communities across Alabama and Mississippi have turned into home bases for a cottage industry as health advocates dust off their sewing machines to help fight the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19.

Menthol cigarettes are easier to start and harder to quit. – No Menthol Sunday: May 17

The O'Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB is at the forefront of a national campaign to engage faith leaders, churches and their communities in discussions about how to improve outcomes for African Americans who use tobacco. Coordinated by the National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, the campaign culminates in an annual event, called No Menthol Sunday, and encourages congregations to take time during their regular religious services on May 17 to discuss the dangers of cigarette and tobacco use.

The pastor of Greater Saint John Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, knows that every trip outside – where he will encounter dozens of people – is a risk. Yet he calls it a risk worth taking to deliver help to his neighbors across the city who need it the most.

The O'Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB remains committed to standing at the forefront of cancer treatment, education and research. The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has brought unprecedented challenges that require new strategies and procedures to ensure the safety of our patients and staff.


COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS NEWSLETTER: PAST ISSUES

July 2020

July 2020

June 2020

June 2020

May 2020

May 2020

April 2020

April 2020