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In keynote addresses at UAB’s COVID-19 Research Symposium, Anthony Fauci, M.D., and Kathleen Neuzil, M.D., shared the latest science on how COVID-19 spreads and the safety and efficacy of vaccines in late-stage trials.

With his idea for a coil that travels through the vasculature much like a sailboat riding the breeze, a UAB neuroradiologist has earned a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

Learn how UAB bioinformaticist Jake Chen, Ph.D., and computer scientist Da Yan, Ph.D., shifted their venerable gathering online and aided the fight against COVID-19.

A faculty member in the School of Health Professions turns his own experiences running research projects into a vision for a comprehensive, automated digital solution with the help of funding from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

With funding from UAB’s urgent COVID-19 research grants, researchers are testing penehyclidine to halt the acute respiratory distress syndrome seen in seriously ill patients by defending crucial cell barriers.

A novel detergent-like compound developed by UAB researchers that blocks HIV and HSV viruses from entering cells could have the same effect against the virus that causes COVID-19. The team is exploring the compound’s potential with a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

Colleagues explain say retiring Animal Resources Program Director Samuel Cartner, DVM, Ph.D., has helped shape the institution’s research.

Benjamin Larimer, Ph.D., has received a five-year, $1.5-million New Innovator Award grant to develop a PET imaging test that identifies patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.

Using extensive testing, diagnosis and clinical data from across the Deep South, this project will be the first to analyze multiple dimensions of inequality to clarify contributions to COVID-19 disparities.

ScopeAssist, invented by a physician and an engineer, is designed to help surgeons deal with the rigors associated with endoscopic surgeries.

Doctors don’t have anything to reliably collect urine from neonates. A solution to this problem earned a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

The vaccine pipeline rests largely on a single tree in Chile. A sustainable, cost-effective solution from this UAB chemist earned him a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

Most PPE goes on the provider, not the patient. A solution to this problem from UAB faculty earned them a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

An interdisciplinary team of faculty and graduate students are using machine learning to identify geographic areas in which social determinants contribute to the COVID-19 burden as a way to improve the public health response.

The immune system’s first responders are implicated in acute respiratory distress syndrome, which greatly increases mortality in patients with COVID-19. With pilot funding from UAB’s urgent COVID-19 research initiative, investigators are exploring a potentially powerful new form of treatment.

Moon Nahm, M.D., has identified the crucial antibodies for pneumococcal vaccines and helped lower prices from $100 per dose to $2. With pilot funding from UAB’s urgent COVID-19 research initiative, Nahm is adapting his proven techniques to SARS-CoV-2.

Alabamians have early access to potentially life-saving vaccines and treatments for COVID-19 through UAB. Why? The same reasons that clinical trials activity at UAB has more than doubled in the past five years. Here's how it happened.

A bioluminescent one-two punch targets mitochondria in cancer cells and evades the blood-brain barrier for a potential new treatment for neuroendocrine cancers, triple-negative breast cancer and brain cancers.

UAB is enrolling patients as part of randomized controlled trials that experts say are necessary to prove the efficacy of the much-discussed COVID-19 treatment.

In a new trial funded through UAB’s urgent COVID-19 research program, investigators are comparing the widely available steroid methylprednisolone with dexamethasone, which lowered risk of dying by one-third in a U.K. trial this summer.

Projects will receive U.S. Economic Development Administration grant support for proof-of-concept and early-stage product development.

With a nearly $3 million grant from the NIH, researchers are studying interactions among sleep, nicotine and race.

Project LEAP will make novel use of integrated patient navigation and student champions to help high-risk young residents.

This summer’s COVID-19 Data Science Hackathon spurred many creative applications and several ongoing projects, including an automated genomic epidemiology pipeline and a machine-learning based viral transmission simulator.

Interdisciplinary center is focused on cutting-edge research that can be developed into better treatments — and helping junior faculty develop their own research programs.

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