Color Block

Visiting artists celebrate the city
By Charles Buchanan • Photos by Steve Wood

Color Block

Photos of Amanda Browder's "Magic Chromacity" fabric art installation
Visiting artists celebrate the city
By Charles Buchanan • Photos by Steve Wood
“Magic Chromacity,” Amanda Browder’s gigantic ribbon of bold color, wrapped and wove together UAB’s Cultural Corridor during her residency in the Department of Art and Art History. The New York installation artist has draped historic urban buildings and even entire moving vans; she constructed her newest piece with more than 10,000 square feet of donated fabric and local help during community sewing days. Once completed, the stitched wonder adorned the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts (AEIVA) and Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center for a week.

"Magic Chromacity" fabric art installation on AEIVA building
Browder was one of several up-and-coming artists who created works at the AEIVA during its first year:

• Brooklyn screenprinter Mike Tabie, the cofounder of Two Arms Inc., has created images for clients ranging from ESPN to the Dave Matthews Band. At UAB, he enlisted the public to help him print a limited-edition poster filled with Birmingham icons (pictured below). “The appeal of screenprinting is the handmade aesthetic,” he says. “After your hard work, you can physically hold it in your hands, feel the ink, and see the texture and quality of the print. It’s a labor of love.”

Poster featuring Birmingham icons created by Mike Tabie

• Brooklyn performance artist George Ferrandi is a sculptor of spaces, of stories, of experiences. A Facebook photo of a party inspired “The Prosthetics of Joy,” her ambitious UAB creation, which involved 40 people in a one-time-only event. “We’re taking a 2-D image and approaching it sculpturally,” Ferrandi says. “I refer to it as a historical reenactment,” with no separation between the set, characters, and costumes.

See drawings, photos, and sculptures from "The Prosthetics of Joy."