The UAB Center for Nutrient-Gene Interaction in Cancer Prevention (CNGI)


Funded by National Cancer
Institute
as part of a research program organized by Nutritional Science Group of the Division of Cancer Prevention


Pilot Projects

Pilot Grants from the UAB Center for Nutrient-Gene Interaction in Cancer Prevention

The UAB Center for Nutrient-Gene Interaction (CNGI) in Cancer Prevention invites UAB, NCCC, and related faculty to apply for idea grants through its 2005 Fall Pilot Project Program. The Center's focus is on how particular dietary components (such as isoflavones in soy, resveratrol in grapes and onions, and EGCg in green tea) in conjunction with more familiar dietary factors (fat, total calories, etc.) may modify gene and protein expression in the steroid hormone pathway, particularly around the time of puberty, and thus impact breast and prostate cancer risk later in life. CNGI research includes experimental, epidemiologic, and bioinformatic components and falls under the parameters of the NIH Roadmap.

Emphasis for pilot projects will be placed on those that contribute to the understanding of one or more of the areas being studied by CNGI and that will lead to publications and R01-type grant applications. The use of CNGI core resources by the pilot projects is encouraged. These resources support high dimensional analytical procedures (such as DNA microarray and SNP analysis, proteomic analysis, and mass-spectrometry), bioinformatics, and statistical analyses.

Examples of basic investigations that are of interest include (but are not limited to):

Examples of the types of epidemiology/population science projects that are of interest include (but are not limited to):

It is expected that 3-4 pilot awards in the range from $25,000-$40,000 (direct costs exclusive of the costs associated with the use of core resources) will be made. Awards will be made for one year. Competitive renewal for a second year will be considered. Junior faculty salaries will be supported up to 10%; other faculty salaries will not be supported.

Investigators not currently involved in CNGI are strongly encouraged to discuss pilot project ideas and needs with the leaders of CNGI prior to submission:

Details of the application

Applications should be delivered to Ms. Rose Johnson in the CNGI office Rm# 454 McCallum Bldg (Please submit 1 original + 5 copies) by 4 pm on Monday, November 14th, 2005. Although an application may be submitted electronically, a signed, printed version must follow prior to its release for review. The application must consist of the following:

  1. The front page of a NIH PHS 398 R01 application
  2. An abstract page (as per NIH R01)
  3. A complete budget (as used in NIH R01 applications)
  4. A NIH modular 4-page biosketch of the principal investigator
  5. A Resources page
  6. A maximum of five (5) pages, outlining specific aims, objectives, significance of the research, preliminary data, and a description of the methodology to be utilized in the developmental project
  7. Discussion of human use issues (if appropriate) - a just-in-time policy means that an application can be reviewed without IRB approval. However, once approved for funding, the investigator must obtain IRB approval prior to the release of funds
  8. Discussion of animal use issues (if appropriate) - a just-in-time policy means that an application can be reviewed without IACUC approval. However, once approved for funding, the investigator must obtain IACUC approval prior to the release of funds
  9. Literature cited (up to 2 pages)
  10. Letters of support (where appropriate for collaborations, chair’s encouragement)

These funds will be restricted to support of research activities including support for technical staff, supplies, animal costs, and minor equipment (<$1,000). Support for junior faculty salaries is limited to 10%. Funds are not available for graduate student stipends or travel. The applicant may apply for a second year of support but will compete with new applications for funding and will need impressive accomplishments for renewal.

Applicants

The intent of this program is to develop quality research efforts in nutrient-gene interaction and cancer prevention. This may involve not only acquisition of biological and biochemical data, but also issues of data storage, data analysis (statistical and mathematical modeling) and data visualization. Applications are encouraged from faculty in all departments at UAB and the Northern California Cancer Center.

Applicants may be:

All developmental funding applications will undergo scientific review and priority scoring based on NIH procedures. Prior or current external grant support is not a deterrent to this funding mechanism.