If you're interested in careers in research science, scientific policy, science communication, science education, biomedical sales, and more, the Masters of Science in Basic Medical Sciences might be for you. This program is intended for domestic and international students that have some undergraduate STEM field training and wish to increase their knowledge of basic medical sciences.

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Program Options

 Thesis (Plan I)Non-Thesis (Plan II)
 Faculty advisor  Yes  No
 Thesis committee  Yes  No
 Credit hours  45  30
 Semesters  5  3

Admissions Requirements

Direct-admittance to the MSBMS program requires a minimum 3.0 GPA overall, and a minimum 3.0 GPA in at least two of following courses at the 200 level or above: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Developmental Biology, Molecular Biology, Organic Chemistry, or Physiology. GRE is not required. The minimum TOEFL score is 80.

Students are required to submit their transcripts, a personal statement, and three letters of recommendation. Once these materials are received and the application fee is processed, applications will be reviewed.

Deadlines

  • Fall: August 1
  • Spring: December 1
  • Summer: May 1

Careers

The MSBMS is intended as a terminal degree for students desiring many disparate career paths, including but not limited to: research scientists, scientific policy, science communication, science education, biomedical sales, and further graduate study.

Thesis (Plan I)

The Plan I MSBMS thesis degree at UAB can be completed over the course of five semesters. Plan I students will complete a rigorous mentored research project in addition to a rigorous curriculum of required core and elective classes related to the biomedical sciences.

Program Requirements

Successful completion of the Plan I MSBMS degree requires passing 45 credit hours and maintaining a minimum 3.0 GPA. These credit hours are composed of 30 hours of coursework and 15 hours of supervised thesis research (BMS 699).

Coursework

Students will be required to complete the 3 core classes BMS 601, 602 & 604, GRD 617, and a 3 credit hour/500+ level statistics course (see “Courses” below for details). These required courses account for 15 credit hours and are designed to ensure each graduate has the necessary background training to pursue a wide-range of specialty topics in basic medical science. 15 additional credit hours will be taken as electives. Students have the option of earning a concentration by completing 9 of these 15 credit hours in a single subject area.

Thesis Research

BMS 699 (Thesis research, 3 credit hours/semester) must be taken for 5 semesters, for a total of 15 credit hours. This work must be done in an extramurally supported research laboratory of a UAB faculty who will serve as their thesis advisor. The thesis project must be approved by a three faculty member committee that is chaired by the thesis advisor. The project should be able to be completed within 5 semesters.

Expected Course Load

Semesters Courses Credit Hours
Semester 1 (10 Credit Hours)    BMS 601: Molecular & Cell Biology OR BMS 602: Biochemistry & Cell Biology OR BMS 604: General Human Physiology
These three courses are offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters, respectively. Students can begin the program during any semester, which will dictate which core course is taken first. These courses are independent and not prerequisite for each other.
3 Credit Hours
BMS 699: Thesis Research 3 Credit Hours
GRD 617: Critical Thinking & Scientific Integrity
This course is offered every semester through the graduate school
3 Credit Hours
Semester 2 (10 Credit Hours)    BMS 601 or 602 or 604 3 Credit Hours
BMS 699: Thesis Research 3 Credit Hour
BST 603: Intro Biostatistics for Graduate Biomedical Sciences (*other courses my apply based on availability) 3 Credit Hours
Semester 3 (10 Credit Hours)   BMS 601 or 602 or 604 3 Credit Hours
Elective 3 Credit Hours
BMS 699: Thesis Research 3 Credit Hours
Semester 4 (9 credit hours)    Elective 3 Credit Hours
Elective 3 Credit Hours
BMS 699: Thesis Research 3 Credit Hours
Semester 5 (9 credit hours)   Elective 3 Credit Hours
Elective 3 Credit Hours
BMS 699: Thesis Research 3 Credit Hours

Non-Thesis (Plan II)

The Plan II MSBMS non-thesis degree at UAB can be completed over the course of three semesters. Plan II students will complete a rigorous curriculum of required core and elective classes related to the biomedical sciences.

Program Requirements

Successful completion of the Plan II MSBMS degree requires passing 30 credit hours and maintaining a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students will be required to complete the 3 core classes BMS 601, 602 & 604, GRD 617, a 3 credit hour/500+ level statistics course (see “Courses” below for details) and BT 650-652. These required courses account for 18 credit hours and are designed to ensure each graduate has the necessary background training to pursue a wide-range of specialty topics in basic medical science. The remaining 12 credit hours will be taken as electives. Students have the option of earning a concentration by completing 9 of these 12 credit hours in a single subject area.

Students may also take one semester of BMS 698 (Non-Thesis Research, 3 credit hours), in place of BT 650-652 (3 credit hours total); this is subject to faculty advisor approval.

Expected Course Load

Semesters Courses Credit Hours
Semester 1 (10 Credit Hours)    BMS 601: Molecular & Cell Biology OR BMS 602: Biochemistry & Cell Biology OR BMS 604: General Human Physiology
These three courses are offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters, respectively. Students can begin the program during any semester, which will dictate which core course is taken first. These courses are independent and not prerequisite for each other.
3 Credit Hours
BT 650, BT 651 or BT 652: Biotechnology Lab Series
This laboratory course will be offered each semester, and thus it can always be taken in the first semester.
1 Credit Hour
GRD 617
This course is offered every semester through the graduate school
3 Credit Hours
Elective 3 Credit Hours
Semester 2 (10 Credit Hours)    BMS 601 or 602 or 604 3 Credit Hours
BT 650, BT 651 or BT 652: Biotechnology Lab Series 1 Credit Hour
BST 603 (*other courses my apply based on availability) 3 Credit Hours
Elective 3 Credit Hours
Semester 3 (10 Credit Hours) BMS 601 or 602 or 604 3 Credit Hours
BT 650, BT 651 or BT 652: Biotechnology Lab Series 1 Credit Hour
Elective 3 Credit Hours
Elective 3 Credit Hours

 

Courses

  • BMS 601: Molecular and Cell Biology
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will provide a broad but rigorous overview of molecular biology. Cell Structure and between prokaryotes and eukaryotes will be compared and contrasted. DNA structure/organization will be discussed with respect to replication and repair mechanisms. Mendelian, non-Mendelian and chromosonal bases of genetics will also be discussed. Transcription and translation will be discussed in detail, along with their respective regulatory mechanisms. Throughout this course there will be a focus on intracellular organelles that contribute to the generation and regulation of DNA, RNA and protein.


    BMS 602: Biochemistry and Cell Biology
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will cover the structure, function and metabolism of biological macromolecules including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleotides. A rigorous overview of pathways will be discussed that are important for the effective metabolism of macromolecules (e.g. glycolysis, citric acid cycle) and generation of energy for cells. The last part of this course will discuss membrane structure and function, and will provide an overview of eukaryotic cell signaling.


    BMS 604: General Human Physiology
    3 Credit Hours

    This course begins with the study of basic cell function, then proceeds to a rigorous overview of specific human organ systems.


    GRD 617: Critical Thinking and Scientific Integrity for Masters Students
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will give masters students an introduction to the rules of logic and reason that are necessary for effective scientific discourse and debate. In addition, students will be introduced to best practices in the responsible conduct of research, including rigor and reproducibility.


    Statistics Requirement (choose one)
    3 Credit Hours

    BST 603. Intro Biostatistics for Graduate Biomedical Sciences

    Summer, TBD
    3 Credit Hours

    Introductory Biostatistics for Graduate Biomedical Sciences. This course will provide non-biostatistics students seeking a Graduate Biomedical Sciences (GBS) degree with the ability to understand introductory biostatistics concepts. 3 hours. As needed.

    CS 555. Probability & Statistics in CS

    Spring, Tuesday/Thursday 2 pm - 3:15 pm
    3 Credit Hours

    Introduction to Probability and Statistics with applications in Computer Science. Counting, permutations and combinations. Probability, conditional probability, Bayes Theorem. Standard probability distributions. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Central Limit Theorem. Regression and correlation. Hypothesis testing. Random number generation. Random algorithms. Estimating probabilities by simulation. Genetic algorithms.

    BST 611. Intermediate Statistical Analysis I

    Fall, Tuesday/Thursday 9:30 am - 10:45 am
    3 Credit Hours

    Students will gain a thorough understanding of basic analysis methods, elementary concepts, statistical models and applications of probability, commonly used sampling distributions, parametric and non-parametric one and two sample tests, confidence intervals, applications of analysis of two-way contingency table data, simple linear regression, and simple analysis of variance. Students are taught to conduct the relevant analysis using current software such as the Statistical Analysis System (SAS).

    BY 655. Biometry

    Spring, Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
    3 Credit Hours

    Statistical techniques used to analyze and interpret data, with emphasis on biological applications. Lecture and computer-based laboratory. 3 semester hours. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PY 716. Introduction to Statistics and Measurement

    Fall, Tuesday/Thursday 11 am - 12:15 pm
    3 Credit Hours

    Probability, measurement, descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, null hypothesis significance testing, means comparisons, correlation, regression, reliability, validity, categorical data analysis, and nonparametric methods.

  • Students must complete 12 credit hours of elective courses. Completion of 9 credit hours from a single theme is required to earn one of the MSBMS program concentrations.These are currently:

    • Pharmacology and Toxicology (Fall 2018)
    • Genetics & Genomics Science (Fall 2018)
    • Neuroscience (Fall 2018)
    • Immunology (Fall 2019)

    The courses that are pre-approved to satisfy the elective requirements for each theme are listed below.

    Concentration: Pharmacology & Toxicology (9 credit hours)

    BMS 611: Introduction to Pharmacology
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will provide students with an overview of the discipline of Pharmacology or the science of the mechanism and regulation of drug action. Processes will be discussed that are affect most drugs and xenobiotics including absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. The course will provide students with concepts that will be applicable to understanding the activity and regulation of drugs discussed in the Systems Pharmacology courses. Concepts presented in the course will be advantageous to all students in understanding therapeutic drug use or in appreciating drug use and action in many different research settings.


    BMS 612: Systems Pharmacology I
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will introduce the use, mechanism of action and physiological properties of major drug families that are to the nervous system and the endocrine/reproductive system. In addition, this course will also cover specific classes of drugs including antibtiotics and chemotherapeutics. Concepts presented in this course will be advantageous to all students in understanding therapeutic drug use or in appreciating drug use and action in many different research settings. This course is a companion course to BMS 613 (Systems Pharmacology II). Prerequisite: BMS 611 (Introduction to Pharmacology or consent of Course Director).


    BMS 613: Systems Pharmacology II
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will introduce drug use, mechanism of action and physiological properties of major drug families, with a focus on specific organ systems (pulmonary, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal systems; skin, muscle and bone). Concepts presented in this course will be advantageous to all students in understanding therapeutic drug use or in appreciating drug use and action in many different research settings. This course is a companion course to BMS 612 (Systems Pharmacology I). Prerequisite: BMS 611 (Introduction to Pharmacology or consent of Course Director).


    BMS 614: Toxicology, Drug Discovery and Development
    3 Credit Hours

    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the field of toxicology and its association with pharmacology. This course will also provide an overview of the thought processes associated with defining drug targets and developing drug candidates. The course is separated into two modules: 1) introduction to toxicological issues associated with the drug and xenobiotic exposure; 2) introduction to the process of identifying a drug target, and developing and validating a drug that pharmacologically interacts with the target.

    Concentration: Genetics & Genomics Sciences (9 credit hours)

    GGSC 610: Genetic Basis of Human Disease
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will focus on the medical applications of genetics and genomic technologies. Topics covered include, but are not limited to major forms of chromosomal abnormalities, mutations and genetic disorders, genetic risk assessment and population genetics, and genomic approaches to diagnosis.


    GGSC 620: Applications of Bioinformatics
    3 Credit Hours

    Introduction to computational tools and bioinformatics databases used in the fields of genetics and genomic sciences. This course will cover a wide variety of different bioinformatics applications, which will be taught through use of available on-line bioinformatics resources. Topics covered include large-scale genomic databases, sequence analysis systems, protein sequence analysis, structural bioinformatics, protein folding, and homology modeling.


    GGSC 690: Model Systems for Genetics Disorders
    3 Credit Hours

    Invertebrate and non-human vertebrate species are commonly used in scientific research work to provide significant insights into human genetic processes and disease. This course focuses on the different methods and strategies by which researchers use these systems for genetic and genomic analyses of human biology and relevant disorders. Model organisms covered include, but are not limited to nematodes (C. elegans), fruit flies (Drosophila sp.), zebrafish (Danio rerio), and mice (Mus musculus).


    GGSC 691: Personalized Genomic Medicine
    3 Credit Hours

    Significant developments in the fields of genetics and genomics are making it possible to tailor medical care to the specific needs of patients. New diagnostic tests, up to and including whole genome sequencing, provide increasingly powerful tools for the identification of the genetic basis of both rare and common disorders. Better understanding of the causes of disease are permitting drugs to be developed that precisely target disease mechanisms, increasing the efficacy and avoiding side effects. These and other new advanced are leading to major changes in healthcare delivery and provide the consumer with new opportunities and complex choices. This course will focus on exploring state-of-the-art genetic, genomic, and informatic tools now available to enable personalization of healthcare.


    BY 629. Evolutionary Biology
    3 Credit Hours

    This course introduces the history of evolutionary thought and modern evolutionary theory. Discussions cover (but are not limited to) the history of life, mechanisms of evolutionary change, sexual selection, adaptation, speciation, and molecular evolution. Students will also be introduced to historical and contemporary studies of evolution on a wide variety of topics and organisms. Regular meetings outside of lecture will involve discussions of classic and contemporary research papers in the field.


    BY 637. Epigenetics
    3 Credit Hours

    This course provides a survey of the field of epigenetics, introducing the student to the diverse areas of epigenetic research in a variety of eukaryotic systems. The course combines lectures with discussion of primary literature and research talks from invited faculty speakers working in epigenetics. In addition to providing an overview of the field of epigenetics, this course emphasizes working with primary scientific literature and the development of critical reading skills. Additional assignments are required for graduate credit.


    BY 634. Functional Genomics and Systems Biology
    3 Credit Hours

    Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomic, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. Prerequisite: BY210 minimum grade of C.

    Concentration: Neuroscience (9 credit hours)

    NBL 610: Special Topics in Neuroscience
    3 Credit Hours

    Molecular Neuroscience will provide students an advanced understanding of how the brain works with a focus on protein function. Everything the brain does is built upon the actions of proteins, many of which are completely unique to the brain. Together we will work to thoroughly understand the exact molecular mechanisms utilized by the brain to support the complex function of our most fascinating organ. Topics covered will include brain morphogenesis, axonal outgrowth, synapse formation, neurotransmitter biosynthesis, intracellular signaling, and the blood brain barrier. This lecture course is designed to fulfill a neuroscience major’s requirement for an advanced course. Non-neuroscience majors should seek course master approval before enrolling and must have a significant background in biology and/or chemistry. Students will be required to purchase a text. Grades will be assigned based on points accumulated through weekly quizzes, cumulative exams, and written reports.


    NBL 633: Diseases of the Nervous System
    3 Credit Hours

    Molecular mechanisms and treatments for neurological, psychiatric, and injury based disorders and diseases of the nervous system. Topics include neurodevelopmental disorders (including intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders), neurological disorders (including neurodegenerative and demyelinating disease), neuropsychiatric disorders (including depression disorders and schizophrenia), and injury to the nervous system (including stroke and traumatic brain and spinal cord injury).


    NBL 634: Mechanisms of Memory
    3 Credit Hours

    Molecular, cellular, systems and medical components of neuroscience, with an emphasis on cognition and cognitive disorders. Covers topics ranging from genes and molecules to human behavior, using cognitive function and clinical cognitive disorders as the unifying theme, with a focus on learning and memory and disorders of these processes.


    NBL 625: Methods in Human Neuroimaging
    3 Credit Hours

    Cognitive neuroscience research has provided valuable insights into the workings of the human brain. The ability to perform neuroimaging studies on awake human individuals engaged in cognitive, social, sensory, and motor tasks has produced a conceptual revolution in the study of human cognition. This course will comprehensively examine the methods and techniques in neuroimaging with the primary goal of building basic knowledge in the concepts and techniques of neuroimaging. The course will explore techniques, such as single and multi-cell recordings, deep brain stimulation, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and diffusion tensor imaging, and focuses on functional magnetic resonance imaging. Course goals: By the end of the course, students will have gained basic knowledge in the field and will be able to read and critically assess scientific journal articles that make use of a variety of neuroimaging methods. The secondary and implicit goal of this course is to create and nurture, in students, a genuine interest in neuroscience and neuroimaging.


    PY 653. Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience
    3 Credit Hours

    Neural systems which control behavior will be studied, incorporating knowledge gained from neurobiological and psychological research. Topics will include synaptic communication, sensation and perception, movement, genetic influences on behavior, motivation, emotions, psychopathology, brain plasticity, and an extended module on learning.


    PY 663. Language: Mind, Brain and Society
    3 Credit Hours

    Combines cognitive and behavioral perspectives with what is known about brain systems that support language and how those systems are impaired in developmental and neurological disorders. Topics include: speech perception, word comprehension, semantics, bilingualism, speech production, sentence processing, reading, and the social aspects of language.


    PY 687. The Dynamics of Pain
    3 Credit Hours

    This course provides a comprehensive study of pain, from basic anatomy through clinical treatment and measurement.


    PY 693. Cognitive Neuroscience
    3 Credit Hours

    How cognitive processing originates from brains. Focus on synthetic approaches to sensory-input guided behavior implemented in a biologically realistic manner; neurobiological wetware underlying cognition; study and construction of synthetic approaches that emulate biological behavior and psychological processes.

    Concentration: Immunology (9 credit hours)

    MIC 601. Foundations in Immunology I: The Innate Immune System
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will introduce the cells, receptors, signaling pathways and soluble mediators associated with the innate immune response. The basic components of the innate immune system will then be discussed in the context of their role in the physical, physiological, phagocytic and inflammatory barriers that comprise the innate immune system. Importantly, emphasis will be placed on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that are used by the innate immune system to detect and respond to microbial pathogens to provide the first line of defense.


    MIC 602. Foundations in Immunology II: The Adaptive Immune System
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will provide an in-depth analysis of the cells (T, B and antigen presenting cells), tissues (primary and secondary) and soluble factors (cytokines and chemokines) that comprise the adaptive humoral immune response. The course will examine how cells of the adaptive immune system discriminate self from non-self, including the nature of antigen receptors, the types of antigens recognized and the signals involved in the generation of effector cells that mediate the response.


    MIC 603. Foundations in Immunology III: Microbial Pathogen-Immune System Interaction
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will provide an overview of major concepts related to virulence mechanisms utilized by microbial pathogens and their effect on the host immune response. Emphasis will be placed on important virulence factors/mechanisms associated with bacterial, viral and fungal pathogens and how these alter various components of the innate and adaptive immune responses to allow escape of the pathogen and its survival. This course will introduce the concept of emerging infectious diseases and how their spread is related to their ability to escape detection by the immune system.


    MIC 604. Foundations in Immunology IV: Immunologically-Mediated Diseases
    3 Credit Hours

    This course will focus on the role of the immune system, including the molecular and cellular processes, that contribute to morbidity and mortality associated with immunodeficiency (congenital and acquired), asthma/allergy, autoimmunity (systemic and organ-specific), transplantation and inflammatory syndromes associated with heart disease, cancer, chronic neurological disease and diabetes.

  • Some Courses may be used towards specific concentration subject to advisor approval. The double listing of a specific course indicates that it is pre-approved for use with a specific concentration.

    Biology

    BY 520: General Endocrinology
    3 Credit Hours

    Roles of endocrine and neuroendocrine chemical messengers in the control of cellular and physiological processes. Term paper required. Prerequisite: BY 256 or permission of instructor.


    BY 605. Microbial Physiology
    3 Credit Hours

    Microbial structure and function, growth, metabolism, and regulation of cellular activity. Independent project required. Prerequisites: BY 271 and 3 semester hours of organic chemistry.


    BY 629. Evolutionary Biology
    3 Credit Hours

    This course introduces the history of evolutionary thought and modern evolutionary theory. Discussions cover (but are not limited to) the history of life, mechanisms of evolutionary change, sexual selection, adaptation, speciation, and molecular evolution. Students will also be introduced to historical and contemporary studies of evolution on a wide variety of topics and organisms. Regular meetings outside of lecture will involve discussions of classic and contemporary research papers in the field.


    BY 637. Epigenetics
    3 Credit Hours

    This course provides a survey of the field of epigenetics, introducing the student to the diverse areas of epigenetic research in a variety of eukaryotic systems. The course combines lectures with discussion of primary literature and research talks from invited faculty speakers working in epigenetics. In addition to providing an overview of the field of epigenetics, this course emphasizes working with primary scientific literature and the development of critical reading skills. Additional assignments are required for graduate credit.


    BY 640. Immunology
    3 Credit Hours

    Immune system and functions of host humoral and cellular immune responses. Mechanisms of antigen and antibody reactions and basic immunological methods. Term paper required.


    BY 634. Functional Genomics and Systems Biology
    3 Credit Hours

    Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomic, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. Prerequisite: BY210 minimum grade of C.


    BY 540. Biology of Aging
    3 Credit Hours

    Current understanding of aging, measuring aging changes, theories of aging and aging changes in various human systems.

    Chemistry

    CH 664. Biophysical Chemistry
    3 Credit Hours

    Common physical methods for understanding the structure and stability of macromolecules that include several spectroscopic, thermodynamic and computational methods. Underlying physical principle described, instrumentation discussed, and examples cited from the literature.

  • Students are limited to 4 credit hours max from the list below:


    GRD 727: Writing Reviewing Research
    Fall/Spring/Summer, Time TBA
    3 Credit Hours

    Designed for individuals writing research and review papers. Writers select their own topics. Course offers instruction in essential strategies and techniques, practice, peer review, and instructor feedback. Instructor approval required for second-language writers.


    GRD 701: Presentation & Discussion Skills
    Fall/Spring/Summer, Wednesday 5:30 pm - 8 pm
    3 Credit Hours

    This course is designed to develop professional communication skills through individual presentations and group evaluations. Topics include the basics of oral presentation, content, organization, and delivery of formal presentations; use of voice and nonverbal communication; and speaking to different audiences. Students’ presentations are videotaped and critiqued by their classmates and the instructor.


    GRD 705. Teaching at the College Level and Beyond
    Fall/Spring/Summer, Monday 5:30 pm - 8 pm
    3 Credit Hours

    Introduces many of the basic principles needed to teach effectively at the college level and addresses current issues relevant to college teaching. Topics include creating a learning environment, course and syllabus design, effective lecturing, active learning approaches, evaluation and grading, and using technology to enhance learning.


    GRD 706. Grants and Fellowships 101
    Fall 2017, Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
    1 Credit Hour

    Introduces the extramural funding process. Topics include types of awards, funding sources, components of an application, the review process, and writing effective grant proposals. One-day workshop.


    GRD 707. Presenting Effectively
    Fall 2017, Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
    1 Credit Hour

    Provides an overview of giving effective oral presentations in academic and professional settings. Topics include analyzing audience and purpose, characteristics of an effective delivery, strategies for planning and design, handling questions and answers, boosting confidence, and using technology in presentations. One-day workshop.


    GRD 708. Writing Successfully
    Spring 2018, Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
    1 Credit Hour

    Addresses issues involved in writing academic and professional settings. Topics include analyzing audience and purpose, addressing common writing problems, developing effective writing practices, writing for publication, communicating research to general public, and productivity strategies for writers. One-day workshop.


    GRD 709. Writing Fellowships
    Spring, Tuesday 1 pm - 3 pm
    3 Credit Hours

    Participants are introduced to ways to construct a bio-sketch, search for funding sources, how to construct a fellowship budget, and grant-related administrative policies. The importance of peer review and how to respond to review critiques is covered as well as training plans, team-building and peer-review skills.


    GRD 710. Career Workshop for Graduate Students
    Spring/Summer
    1 Credit Hour

    This workshop introduces a variety of career choices for students working on advanced degrees in the life sciences. Topics may include sources of career information, self-assessment, resume construction, interviewing, using new technologies in job searches, career choices, the hidden job market, networking, and negotiating.


    GRD 713. Mentoring 101
    Summer, Tuesday 12 pm - 1 pm; Fall/Spring, Time TBA
    1 Credit Hour

    This seminar will cover the science and theory on mentoring, including the mentor-mentee relationship, issues of gender, culture, age, and other power differentials; contemporary mentoring strategies as they relate generally and specifically to situations and fields; applying different mentoring models to real life/workplace.


    GRD 733. Managing & Leading Teams
    Spring, Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
    1 Credit Hour

    This course will cover the latest science in managing and leading teams across disciplines, focusing on the student's development of team presentations, peer discussion and review. 1 day.

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Questions?

Please reach out to program director John J. Shacka at (205) 996-7252 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions you may have.