Kent R. Kerley, Ph.D.

Contact

Contact-image

Associate Professor, Director of UAB Crime REU

Address:
University Boulevard Office Bldg.
1201 University Blvd.
Room 313
Birmingham, AL 35294-4562

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 205-934-8548

Fax: 205-934-2067

Other information

Other information:
Kent R. Kerley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Justice Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His primary research interests include corrections, religiosity, cyber-crime, and intimate partner violence. He is author of the monograph, Religious Faith in Correctional Contexts (2014, First Forum Press/Lynne Rienner Publishers). His research has also appeared in top journals such as Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Justice Quarterly, Social Forces, and Social Problems. He has received funding for his research from the National Science Foundation, Google, and the Religious Research Association.

Curriculum Vitae

Education:
Ph.D. 2001 University of Tennessee, Sociology
M.A. 1997 University of Tennessee, Sociology
B.A. 1995 East Tennessee State University, Criminal Justice

Research Interests:
Religion and crime
Intimate partner violence
Cybercrime

Teaching Interests:
Corrections
Religion
Quantitative Methods
Policy

Recent Courses Taught:
Research Methods (JS300)
Police in America (JS220)
Professional Seminar in Criminal Justice (JS 600)
Seminar in Criminal Justice Policy (JS604)
White-Collar and Corporate Crime (JS440/540)

Recent Publications:
Forthcoming, 2014. Kerley, Kent R. Religious Faith in Correctional Contexts. Boulder, CO: First Forum Press/Lynne Rienner Publishers. https://www.rienner.com/title/Religious_Faith_in_Correctional_Contexts

2014. Kerley, Kent R., Lindsay Leban, Heith Copes, Christine Agnone, and Leah Taylor. “Methamphetamine Using Careers of White and Black Women.” Deviant Behavior

2012. Levin, Rachel, Jonathan Richardson, Gary Warner, and Kent R. Kerley. “Explaining Cybercrime through the Lens of Differential Association Theory: Hadidi44-2.php PayPal Case Study.” IEEE Xplore Oct:1-7. DOI: 10.1109/eCrime.2012.6489518

2011. Kerley, Kent R., Heith Copes, Alana J. Linn, Lauren Eason, Minh H. Nguyen, and Ariana Mishay Stone. “Understanding Personal Change in a Women’s Faith-Based Transitional Center.” Religions 2:184-197.  

2011. Kerley, Kent R., Heith Copes, Richard Tewksbury, and Dean A. Dabney. “Examining the Relationship between Religiosity and Self-Control as Predictors of Prison Deviance.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 55:1251-1271.

2011. McGrath, Shelly A., Ashlyn Abbott Nilsen, and Kent R. Kerley. “Sexual Victimization in Childhood and the Propensity for Juvenile Delinquency and Adult Criminal Behavior: A Systematic Review.” Aggression and Violent Behavior 16:485-492.

2011. Xu, Xiaohe, Kent R. Kerley, and Bangon Sirisunyaluck. “Understanding Gender and Domestic Violence from a Sample of Married Women in Urban Thailand.” Journal of Family Issues 32:791-819.

Grants:
2013-2016. Kerley, Kent R. “REU Site: Using the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Mathematics to Study Crime (Renewal).” National Science Foundation. $341,311. (Award # 1261322). Awarded February, 2013.

2010. Copes, Heith and Kent R. Kerley. “Understanding Work-at-Home Scams and Other Fraudulent Activities Using the Google Brand: An Analysis of Victim Complaints to the Internet Crime Complaint Center.” Google. $34,690. (Award # 2007956). Awarded May, 2010.

2010. Kerley, Kent R. “Freedom in Life, Freedom in Faith: Understanding the Impact of a Faith-Based Transitional Center for Women.” Constant H. Jacquet Research Award from Religious Research Association. $4,000. (Award # 2008170). Awarded May, 2010.2010-2013      

Kerley, Kent R. “REU Site: Using the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Mathematics to Study Crime.” National Science Foundation. $333,818. (Award # 1004953). Awarded May, 2010.

2010. Kerley, Kent R. “REU Site: Using the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Mathematics to Study Crime.” National Science Foundation. $333,818. (Award # 1004953). Awarded May, 2010.