UAB in the News: January 24-28, 2011

January 28, 2011

(WBMA-TV, Birmingham)
Everyday, some local college students are fighting crime from a computer lab. UAB cybercrime students help governments and police agencies around the world locate fake bank websites and the people running them.


(The Intelligencer)
Former Lower Makefield resident Larry DeLucas, a professor and director of the Center for Bio-Physical Science and Engineering at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, spent 14 days aboard the Columbia as a civilian scientist in 1992. He said he thought about the Challenger just before that Columbia flight lifted off.


(Florence Times Daily)
"He's going to have a tough time, but there will be a lot of Republicans who will have a tough time in this session," said Larry Powell, professor of political communication at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Whether he's pragmatic or idealistic has the potential to help or hurt him."


(Birmingham Times)
February performances presented by UAB's Alys Stephens Center


January 27, 2011

Breast Cancer Research Foundation of Alabama makes its largest donation to UAB

(WVTM-TV, Birmingham)
The Breast Cancer Research Foundation of Alabama (BCRFA), a longtime and dedicated supporter of the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, has presented its largest annual gift to date: $400,000.


UAB's new 3-D nanoscaffold could revolutionize human tissue engineering

(WVTM-TV, Birmingham)
Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham's School of Engineering have created a three-dimensional electrospun scaffold on the nano scale that more effectively and efficiently facilitates cell and tissue growth in the laboratory.

(Fierece Biotech)


Alabama colleges look at ways to help mentally disturbed students in wake of shooting

(Birmingham News)

"Obviously, when something horrific like that happens, you always look at yourself in the mirror and ask how you're doing," said Andy Marsch, assistant vice president for student life at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, adding that 2007's shooting at Virginia Tech University was also a catalyst for reflection. "But even without these situations, we have to be examining how students are doing and how we're helping them to be successful."


 

January 26, 2011

UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center receives donation

(WBRC-TV, Birmingham)
Breast cancer research at UAB's Comprehensive Cancer Center received a big boost Tuesday.

(WSFA-TV, Montgomery)


"Stoke centers" providing better care, study finds

(Bloomberg Businessweek)
"It's good to know that people who make an effort to deliver evidence-based and organized care are making a difference for stroke patients," said Dr. Andrei Alexandrov, professor of neurology and director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

(Drugs.com)


AT&T and Verizon brace for iPhone war

(Birmingham News)
Bob Robicheaux, a marketing expert and business professor at UAB, said he expects that AT&T will lose both individual and corporate customers to Verizon once its rival introduces the iPhone.


Gilead says FDA won't accept filing for AIDS pill

(Bloomberg Businessweek)
Research presented in July at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna showed TMC278 suppressed the AIDS virus as well as Sustiva, according to Michael Saag at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The study also showed that Sustiva kept more patients' viruses from rebounding, at 4.8 percent compared with 9 percent for TMC278.


January 25, 2011

New Alabama Mental Health Commissioner Zelia Baugh tackles big challenges

(Birmingham News)
Baugh, 44, said she's excited to tackle her newest role. She most recently served as administrator of psychiatry at the Center for Psychiatric Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.


Can Alabama compete globally?

(Alabama Public Television)

We invite you to call in with your questions live during the show. Guests include Linda Lucas, dean of the UAB Engineering Department; Caroline Novak, president of A Plus Alabama; and Tammy Dunn of A Plus College Ready.


January 24, 2011

Some childhood hearing loss tied to virus in pregnancy

(Reuters)
But about half of women have already had it by the time they get pregnant. There's less than a one percent chance of passing it along to your unborn baby if this is the case, said Karen Fowler, who studies childhood infections at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and who did not work on this study.


Viewpoints: Mentally ill persons have a right to higher education

(Birmingham News)
Since the tragic shootings in Tucson just more than two weeks ago, details about the gunman, Jared L. Loughner, have gradually surfaced. One particularly compelling report came from former professors and fellow students at Pima Community College, comments that have led some to suggest that the school might have done more to push Loughner into the counseling he evidently needed.


Bentley to get honeymoon until session starts

(Gadsden Times)
"He definitely gets a honeymoon," said Larry Powell, a professor of communication studies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "He probably doesn't have to come up with major priorities until the session starts, then (his concern is) going to be money."

(Tuscaloosa News)


New biography reveals evolution's co-discoverer as early intelligent design advocate

(Evolution News and Views)
In a sparkling, concise and controversial new biography of the co-discoverer of evolutionary theory, historian Michael A. Flannery tells a largely unknown story that has been embarrassing Darwinians in the know for almost a century and a half.


High-flying virtuosity from pianist Yeol Eum Son in Birmingham recital

(Birmingham News)
Signs that Yeol Eum Son is shedding her image as a Cliburn medalist and becoming a full-blooded pianist were abundant Sunday at her UAB Piano Series recital.


UAB International Week

(WBMA-TV, Birmingham)
The Office of Student Involvement will celebrate campus cultural diversity with its annual "Community Week." Several events and lectures will focus on a mission to highlight the variety of culture represented among the UAB community.