Savannah Koplon

Savannah Koplon

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Public Relations Manager, Health and Medicine

skoplon@uab.edu • (205) 641-1211

Leads external communications in healthcare, biomedical research and for UAB's six professional schools; Dentistry, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing, Optometry and Public Health. Koplon and her team proactively tell the story of UAB health and medicine, including patient stories, innovative research and new therapies, through original content and extensive collaborations with local, national and international media. The team works reactively to ensure appropriate experts are connected with media within their deadline.

Specific beats include: Health System Administration; Heersink School of Medicine (Administration, Student News, Education); Issues Management; Medical Facilities; Medical Partnerships; Precision Medicine; Infectious Diseases; Emergency Medicine; Civitan International Research Center; CCTS;  Department of Informatics; Department of Surgery (Transplantation, Xenotransplantation); Libraries (Reynolds Historical Library, Alabama Museum of the Health Sciences, Lister Hill library)

A K23 grant from the National Institutes of Health will determine how to best improve growth in preterm infants.
UAB and Children’s of Alabama welcome a new director of Pediatric Hospital Medicine.
New recommendations for sexual behavior counseling suggest that shorter, more frequent sessions in a clinical setting can be valuable. 
A long time UAB rheumatologist has been named director of division in the UAB School of Medicine.   
Kenny Mayfield lost his sense of smell in early March. Months later, it still has not returned, a side effect of COVID-19 that he is working to regain.
To protect the health of patients, students and staff, UAB’s School of Dentistry has acquired new technology to help with temperature scanning and aerosol filtration system.
Women who had total body irradiation to prepare for blood or marrow transplantation before age 30 had a 4.5-fold increase in their risk of developing breast cancer later in life.
Higher-volume feedings were determined to help postnatal growth in preterm infants.
In a study led by a UAB neonatologist, findings showed that racial and ethnic disparities in preterm infants decreased.   
UAB’s School of Optometry has been providing eye care services to underserved populations in the Black Belt for 18 years.
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