Research - News
Intranasal vaccination is needle-free and elicits immunity at the site of infection, the respiratory tract.
This research suggests that a path to treat currently untreatable cases of cystic fibrosis is clearly achievable.
Two Collat School of Business marketing professors support the formation of integrative teams of marketing and sales professionals to facilitate cooperation and meaningful communication, and to mitigate workplace conflict.
A small molecule inhibitor has been identified that reduces the growth of uveal melanoma, a rare and deadly cancer of the eye.
Part of the mission of the Civitan International Research Center is to foster the next generation of scientists studying brain development.
Researchers developed a workplace bullying model through qualitative research to help identify critical issues and bring awareness to the seriousness of the issue.
This study is the latest research to investigate the association between cardiovascular disease and diet — which foods have a positive versus negative impact on cardiovascular disease risk.
Seth Hubbard, a UAB undergraduate student studying neuroscience, has received a grant to test the efficacy of carvedilol as a treatment for retinal degeneration, while participating in a summer research fellowship with Fight for Sight.

Investigations by researchers at UAB reveal the existence of a day/night rhythm of heart hormones, and how the disturbance of this rhythm could contribute to a high risk of high blood pressure and poor cardiovascular health in obese individuals.

This novel virulence trait, which increases severity of S. pneumoniae superinfection, involves pneumococcal surface protein A, now identified as an adhesin.

The alliance will focus on boosting participation in clinical research within historically underrepresented patient groups. 

Gregory Friedman, M.D., has received a special grant to test various therapy combinations with a form of the herpes virus to improve anti-tumor immune response in children battling brain cancer.

A comprehensive health-screening program in rural northern KwaZulu-Natal has found a high burden of undiagnosed or poorly controlled non-communicable diseases.

New results suggest the answer is no, implying that the role of tau in the pathogenesis of Lewy body dementias is distinct from Alzheimer’s disease.
A new R01 study aims to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among African American and Black young adults in the Southern United States.

Responsibility for the safety, integrity and scientific validity of the trials fell to 12 experts of the COVID-19 Vaccine Data and Safety Monitoring Board, who now have taken the unusual step of publishing details of their review process.

New findings include a significant increase in risk of death among patients who had recently had chemotherapy.

Patrick Jones, 74, is the first person in the Southeast and the fourth person in the United States to receive the NEXUS aortic arch stent graft, a minimally invasive solution for aortic arch repair.
In his latest book, “Pandemic Bioethics,” philosophy professor Greg Pence, Ph.D., examines allocation of scarce medical resources, immunity passports, vaccines, discrimination and more. It is available as an e-book now and will be in print June 18.
Despite extensive knowledge about HIV, the number of cases of incident HIV infection has decreased only 7 percent over the past decade.
Rachel Wells will lead a study aimed at improving care of underserved adults with advanced heart failure.
With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries.
The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the urgent need for enhanced study and discovery in the field of immunology.
Moderate-to-high rates of television viewing in midlife impacts cognitive function, according to new studies.

A new study finds there are multiple ways to achieve the same health benefits from exercise — as long as your exercise “cocktail” includes plenty of light physical activity but not too much sitting.

Birmingham-based Protective Life Corporation and its parent company, Tokyo, Japan-based Dai-ichi Life Holdings, Inc., committed $3.5 million of gifts locally in 2015 when Dai-ichi acquired Protective. The dedication to being part of building a strong community has continued since that time with $25.9 million of community contributions.
Researchers used a pig model of heart attacks, which more closely resembles the human heart in size and physiology, and thus has high clinical relevance to human disease.
A new study shows that children with COVID-19 may not display typical symptoms such as fever, cough and shortness of breath, therefore more screening and vigilance are required.
A single intranasal dose provided sterilizing immunity — no detectable COVID-19 virus — in the lungs of vaccinated mice, in contrast to dense infection in lungs of unvaccinated mice.
While there are many quality measures for end-of-life care for adults with cancer, there are no such measures for children.
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